It by Stephen King

It

To the children, the town was their whole world. To the adults, knowing better, Derry, Maine was just their home town: familiar, well-ordered for the most part. A good place to live.It was the children who saw - and felt - what made Derry so horribly different. In the storm drains, in the sewers, IT lurked, taking on the shape of every nightmare, each one's deepest dread....

Title:It
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:0450411435
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:1116 pages

It Reviews

  • Maciek
    Nov 22, 2009

    Some time ago the wise bald (or white) heads stationed at various universities came to an agreement that a literary form, commonly known as the novel, is dead - fewer and fewer works of any significance are written each year. Of course, one must understand the requirements the wise gentlemen expect of a novel of worth: it would be good if the writer would include some "aesthetic dignity" by including as much a

    Some time ago the wise bald (or white) heads stationed at various universities came to an agreement that a literary form, commonly known as the novel, is dead - fewer and fewer works of any significance are written each year. Of course, one must understand the requirements the wise gentlemen expect of a novel of worth: it would be good if the writer would include some "aesthetic dignity" by including as much allusions and connections to other previous works of literature - consciously, that is. The language must also be exquisite; preferably obsure and as incomprehensible as possible, drawing from earlier works of worth and including metaphors and allusions to them. If the author by any chance happens to include a

    in his work, there is a good percentage of possibility that his work will be deemed unworthy, and forever excluded by the adacemia.

    Or at least as long as these wise gentlemen live.

    Of course, the reader is not expected to understand, not to mention enjoy the work of worth - no one

    anymore, the wise men would say; people read rubbish like Danielle Steel when Bold & Beautiful is not on the TV. And, by God, no such novel of worth can ever be popular - after all, the intelligence level required to appreciate it is apparently not met by the 90% of world population.

    A literary figure who is as popular and appreciated like The Beatles? Whose work is admired by thousands of people? And the possibility that these people might learn something from it? That is simply not possible - the wise heads mutter in unison - that is simply not possible! Ask people who know!

    Ask

    History, as we know it, has a nasty habit of repeating itself - though in this case something good might actually come out of it. Writers have been criticized before - most notably Twain and Dickens - and yet, their work is still read and loved by whole generations of readers. Their fiction is taught in schools. Huckleberry Finn has been deemed as vulgar and impropable, much od Dickens's work was described as overtly sentimental, but it prevailed - which can't be said about those who concerned themselved with being the so-called "Arbiters of Literature". In the end, they couldn't grind the knives because they weren't theirs to wield.

    The bones of those who tried to define "literature" perished; the works they so often tried to banish did not. No one remembers (or cares) about those who tried to defy the power of Twain or Dickens; they are immortal through their works.

    People perish; books do not. No one cares about the boy's club of the literati, who cry out words of rage from the ivory tower, instead of helping people understand the joy of reading, understanding and believing. The main principle of art is to

    ; the problem is, not many of the educated seem to understand that even simple things can evoke great emotions. But they too will go down in history without leaving any mark on it, forgotten and alone; and I believe that there will be a lot of bodies turning in their graves when some titles enter the school curriculum.

    "IT" by all means, is not a simple novel. To classify it as a "horror" story is the same as saying that "Moby Dick" is a very long manual on whaling. To say that it is all about the monster is to say that the whale is the villain of the piece.

    -Robert McCammon

    Although vulnerable and physically weak, two factors that make them perfect victims, children posess strenght that most adults had lost in the painful process of maturing - the strenght of imagination. A child feels and experiences emotions much more intensely than an adult, but their unique imaginative capacity allows it to cope with the seemingly impropable much more efficiently. Hence when in

    an adult faces a vampire, he fells down dead from a heart attack. When a child faces one, he is able to go to sleep ten minutes later. As King puts it, "Such is the difference between men and boys".

    King has been depicting children throughout his whole career, and his child characters have subsequently grown older, along with his own children. "IT" is in my opinion his best novel with child protagonists; his most elaborate, complex one. It's also one of his longest, if not the longest.

    The lenght is appropriate, because of the theme: After all, it deals with childhood. Childhood defies Time; a day can last forever, and the summers are endless. And then we grow up, all these years pass, just like a blink.

    -Stephen King,

    Children also posess another one of the invaluable assets that most adults strive to grasp, and it still seeps through their fingers, like sand:

    . Children experience the passing of time differently not because time actually slows down for them (that would be a neat thing indeed) but because they occupy a vastly different social position than that of an average adult. Most adults are forced to work and take care of their families, offspring included. Their imagination is dimmed by the countless hours spent on labor, and for most it never really comes back...the disilusions of experience push it farther abd farther down in the dungeons of the mind, until we finally forget that it was even there in the first place.

    Until we forget what we are possible of...what adventures we can create, what worlds and realms, completely out of the whole cloth.

    When you are a child the hours lazily pass by, the only important matter is to get home from school and after throwing the backpack in a corner going to get your friends and hanging out with them till dinner...and then go hang out with them some more.

    Most children experience more during one summer vacation than some adults throughout their whole life; They have their precious innocence, they haven't been spoiled by work, by taxes, by bills and other things that each of us has to face at some point in life. There is always food in the fridge, and there is always roof over the head; and if there is not, there is always hope that there eventually will be, and friends that help to keep it.

    Children

    more and

    more because they can; when school ends, the day is theirs. Their schedule is not as strict as that of an adult; their duties not as responsible. Therefore, they do not have to trouble themselves with money and shelter, and even if they do they are easily able to push these matters away and concentrate completely on what they are doing right here and now.

    With little breaks for homework and chores children can spend the whole day playing make-believe with their precious friends, and sometimes the boundaries between the real and the imagined become thin, and sometimes they vanish altogether.

    Sometimes their thoughts take shapes...and sometimes their fears do too. Sometimes they joy is almost tangible...and sometimes the boogeymen come out of the closet.

    And sometimes they are real.

    "IT" is a story of a group of children who are not among the most popular, strongest or smartest; a tale about the group of seven friends living in Derry, Maine in 1958. They form the self-called "losers" club and encounter a horrible, awesome force lurking in their hometown...a force feeding on fear and devouring young children. A force that adults do not seem to see; a force that appears as a clown, holding a hand full of baloons.

    The seven children all have one thing in common: they encountered IT. They had all escaped...and that one summer of 58, the seven friends have confronted and defeated IT.

    Or so they had thought.

    28 years later a young homosexual is thrown off a bridge in Derry...it seems like a classic, clear case of homophobia, but the testimony of one of the witnesses changes everything.

    He claims he has seen a clown under the bridge...a clown and a cloud of balloons.

    Mike Hanlon, the sole member of the losers who remained in Derry calls the others and reminds them of the promise they had made all these years ago...a promise sealed in blood. A vow to return if IT wasn't dead. If IT will come back. And apparently, IT has.

    Can they face IT again? Can they go back to the horror they have long forgotten?

    They faced the terror as children. It was their time to take action, and they managed to fight it. Now they are all grown-up...but it is their time,too.

    Will the monster be bested...or will IT FEED?

    "IT" is composed of two nonlinear narratives. The first is the story of 1958, where we meet the children and they first encounter IT; King effortlesly interleaves this timeline with the story of 1985, where the adults return to Derry to fight IT, basing on research that has been done on the subject and their returning memories. IT avoids the problems of most other lenghty books: plot threads that go nowhere. Each of them is important, and only adds to the suspense and builds up to the shattering climax.

    If there is a thing which places King above most other writers, it certainly is his great understandning of adolescence. Few others manage to write so vividly and convinclingly about childhood and coming of age.

    The unquestionably hard time of growing up - school, bullies, parents, first crushes - they are all here, and the reader feels as if he himself was experiencing them. King allowed me to re-live my past again; I wasn't around in 1958, but if I were I would undoubtedly be one of the boys. It is truly an impressive experience to read how King builds his characters and the world they live in.

    Which of course includes stormdrains...which might be empty, but then they might be not.

    IT also manages to adress important social topics: racism, prejudice, domestic abuse. But most importantly it is a story about friendship and childhood: How it irrevocably binds people together and affect their lives. About the power of memory and imagination; about the terror of the familiar world which hides many secrets around the corners and down in the sewers. It's a study of children facing the uncanny, and overcoming their greatest fear: the fear of being alone in fright.

    IT is a story of seven friends, each different, each indispensable and irreplaceable.

    stuttering Bill Denbrough, the unlikely group leader;

    Ben Hansocom, an overweight boy, with a talent for architecture;

    Riche Tozier, the brilliant witty boy of many voices;

    Mike Hanlon, the black kid who comes to the group to find acceptance and finds it;

    Eddie Kaspbrak, the asthmatic and fragile boy who finds within the group a thing he has never dreamed of - courage;

    Stan Uris, a sensible boy who brings understanding;

    and Beverly March, the sole girl in the group, an redhead who is both sweet and tough, and helps the boys in most dire of moments.

    King has proven himself earlier to be capable of producing an epic narrative (

    in 1978), but I think that IT is equal to - or even surpasses - the story of the plague.

    This is a brilliant novel, beautifully told in crisp, clear prose, with truly unforgettable characters and situations. It is the essence of good fiction; the truth inside the lie. King knows his way around the corners; and has that undefiniable look in the eye, the dreamy look of a child. His words are the best set of toys he ever had; and he's generous enough to share them with us. And when he's showing us how his trains travel along the tracks of his imagination and

    they go to, we won't dare to blink because we could miss a minute of the experience...even when the carriage passes through some dark tunnels.

    And if it is the work of an "inadequate writer", a producer of "penny dreadfuls", without any "aesthetic value" or other high-flown pretentious gibberish babbled by people who would most likely want to cast Stephen King and his readers to hell for destroying the image of "Literary Reader"?

    Like Huck Finn, I'd shout loud "All right, then, I'll GO to hell!"

    Literary Heaven might have a better climate; but Literary Hell sure has better company.

  • Stepheny
    Dec 01, 2011

    Let me take you all on a tour, kids. We’re going to everyone’s favorite place- Derry, Maine! We’re going to do some sight-seeing while I talk about the book that is my absolute hands-down #1 book of ALL TIME. And no, it is NOT Harry Potter! Shocking, I know! (That always surprises people.) Anyway, my name is

    Stepheny and I’ll be your tour guide!

    We’re going to go where it all begins- the most infamous storm drain in all the lands. This is the storm drain where Pennywise offers little

    Let me take you all on a tour, kids. We’re going to everyone’s favorite place- Derry, Maine! We’re going to do some sight-seeing while I talk about the book that is my absolute hands-down #1 book of ALL TIME. And no, it is NOT Harry Potter! Shocking, I know! (That always surprises people.) Anyway, my name is

    Stepheny and I’ll be your tour guide!

    We’re going to go where it all begins- the most infamous storm drain in all the lands. This is the storm drain where Pennywise offers little Georgie a balloon. “We all float down here, Georgie.” But trust me, kiddos, you don’t want to float.

    Our next stops will show you a few of the major landmarks in Derry. Ben Hanscomb, literary boyfriend #2, spent a good amount of his childhood at the library. Pennywise is also fond of that library.

    Next we will visit the Paul Bunyan statue. That tool in his hand is a good indicator that this is in Maine. It is the ONLY Paul Bunyan statue in the country where he is holding that tool. It was created in Maine and that is why he is displaying it here.(And no, I don't know what it's called, just that it is used to pick up and move logs.) Richie was resting on a bench after being chased by Henry Bowers and Co when he is “awoken” by this statue coming to life. Paul proceeds to chase Richie down the streets of Derry while swinging his ax! Was Richie dreaming or did it really happen?

    The Kissing Bridge where poor Adrian Mellon was thrown off for being a homosexual can be spotted in downtown Derry. The sad reality of this is that a teenage boy who was openly homosexual was actually thrown off of this canal in Bangor. The boy would have survived with only broken legs had the degenerates who threw him over gone down and turned him over. He was asthmatic and landed face down in mere inches of water. It was enough to seal his fate. He died and inspired two separate aspects of this story.

    Now we’ll stop by Bev’s house and see if she wants to go down to the Barrens with us. Hopefully she doesn’t have any more blood pouring out of her bathroom sink. Lord knows I don’t want to clean anymore of that up! Bev’s house is mentioned several times throughout the book and her status as “poor” is emphasized. This house, which is multiple apartments, is

    how I had envisioned it. And no joke, there was a shady-looking-drug-dealer- type who came out of nowhere to add to the overall effect! Yikes!

    Moving right along, now!

    We’ll head on down to the Barrens now and see if we can catch up with the gang! Oh! I see Silver propped up against the same tree. Stuttering Bill, Eddie, Mike, Richie, Stan and Ben must be down here. We’ll drop Bevvie off and take a few pictures before moving on.

    Ah, the Barrens. When visiting them in April instead of high Summer, one will find a raging rapid resembling a river. But be not fooled my friends! For in the summer the water is almost nonexistent; it is a trickle if you’re lucky.

    When the Losers hang out down here there is some water, but not anything such as this. But, you can still see the allure of a place like this for kids. It is still a very popular hangout for them to this day.The place where the Losers enter into Pennywise’s lair can be seen in the bottom right hand picture. That is the exact spot King had in mind. *shudders*

    Our last stop is one of the most breath-taking spots. It is the highest point in all of

    Derry. It holds the Standpipe in all its beautiful glory. All of the woodwork is original and it stands proudly looking out over the city. Directly in front of it sits the bird observatory where Stan often came to do some birdwatching. And the bench that you can see me sitting on grinning like an idiot who just won the lottery? What is that bench you ask? Well, kids, that is

    bench…. *gulps* the bench that Stephen King sat to write IT. He sat out there on that very bench for hours with a legal pad*** and one leg resting casually over the other one while he worked on a masterpiece.

    I was overwhelmed when I sat there. Truly.

    When I try to articulate what it is this book means to me I find myself incapable of speech. I get frustrated with trying to explain so much at once; at trying to narrow down the vast meaning in this book. I get very upset when people refer to it as “the one with the serial killer clown”. It is so much more than that. And I mean that both ways- IT is more than just a clown in the book and IT the book is so much more than a book about a clown.

    It is about belief. The belief that your friends will be by your side through the worst part of your life. The belief* that they will share in the great times as well. The belief that magic is real and it is real because you believe it to be. It is about the belief you have in yourself that you are strong and capable of conquering anything that stands in your way.

    IT is about love, friendship and empowerment. All the proof of that I need is in the Apocalyptic Rock Fight. It’s about standing up to those who try to beat you down- whether physically, mentally or spiritually. It is about taking control of your life and your destiny. It’s about accepting responsibility even when you don’t want to.

    I love this book as it has become a part of me. It’s ingrained in me; a part of my very soul. Whenever I revisit it I am surprised to find I am crying at a different part. This time,

    . That just broke my heart.

    I don’t recommend IT for everyone or just anyone. IT is one of my “special reserve recommendations” that get handed out to those I trust with it. I can’t bear to think someone could read this book and not see what I see or feel what I feel.** It hurts my heart too much to think of that. But, know if I have recommended it or suggested it to you that I believe you to be of a strong character; a fellow Loser.

    I do hope you have all enjoyed my tour. I suppose I should let you get back home now. If you’re walking- look out for those drains! Sweet dreams tonight, kids. It’s been fun!

    *Thanks, Delee! ;)

    **For all of the potential trolls- I know AND understand that people have varying opinions on books. I get it. I just mean that this book means too much to me to go handing it out willy-nilly to people who are going to read it without understanding it or even trying to. /rant

    ***pad not pen

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  • Jennifer
    Oct 27, 2012

    Some parts were truly creepy at first and initially, as often happens with King, I couldn't put it down. But then, as often happens with King, it hits a brick wall and becomes so over-long and has so many unnecessary elements that get in the way of the main story that it becomes a bloated, endless chore to finish. People often say they hate the ending of this book...I did not hate it or love it. I had checked out at that point and simply wanted it to be over no matter who lived or died or whethe

    Some parts were truly creepy at first and initially, as often happens with King, I couldn't put it down. But then, as often happens with King, it hits a brick wall and becomes so over-long and has so many unnecessary elements that get in the way of the main story that it becomes a bloated, endless chore to finish. People often say they hate the ending of this book...I did not hate it or love it. I had checked out at that point and simply wanted it to be over no matter who lived or died or whether they defeated It or not.

    This book is at least 300 pages too long and that is the least that could have been completely cut out without hurting the story in the slightest. Included in those 300+ pages are some particularly disturbing sequences and elements which were just sickening, unnecessary and, to me, actually took away from the main story.

    The events and elements that killed "It" for me:

    1. A bizarre, out-of-nowhere scene portraying sex play between two male pre-teen, would-be murderous bullies--which had nothing to do with the story and led nowhere.

    2. An extended description of animal torture/killing--which stemmed from the bully in the sex-play, which had nothing to do with the story and ultimately, again, was pointless and unnecessary.

    3. A detailed description of a kid murdering a baby sibling. No point, nothing to do with the story. Again.

    4. The use of the "N" word more in one place than I have ever read or heard in my life combined. Not necessary, nothing to do with the main part of the story.

    5. And, the scene which blew me away and pretty much made me feel I had wasted time getting that far in: a gang-bang consisting of nothing but 11 and 12-year-olds. What the F***? And when I say "gang bang" I mean it--six boys banging the girl back-to-back. Only abnormal people do not raise an eyebrow at this scene and try to defend it as being "natural" and "normal." It's neither and most decent people would be bothered by this segment.

    So, aside from those main awful things the other annoying elements: the character of Richie. I skipped a lot of his dialogue. I wanted to punch him in the face just for being annoying. And every time he did his "Mexican" voice I just cringed and skipped the next couple lines. Never has a character in a BOOK annoyed me so, so much. I was hoping he would die. Their stupid inside joke of "Beep-beep, Richie." By the twelve thousandth time one of them said this I wanted to just throw the book across the room. Painful to read.

    In the end King took a super creepy story and concept which he could have effectively told in probably 500 pages and blew it up to over 1,000 with too much detail in certain parts, too much back story in others and too many subplots which didn't matter. All of which pretty much wiped out any fear or creepiness for me. By the time I got 700 or so pages in I simply was not scared, not creeped out, no longer interested and didn't care how it ended as long as it ended soon.

    I am aware that some people will feel that I "just don't get it" with my review and complaints. I am totally fine with that. I am totally fine not "getting it" when it comes to this type of thing. :)

    Too bad. Started off as five stars for me and crumbled onto itself into two stars.

  • Matthew
    Jan 08, 2013

    Re-read update - April 2017:

    "He thrusts his fists against the posts and still insists he sees the ghosts"

    I find it appropriate that I first read this between the ages of 12 and 15 and now I re-read at 39. This is pretty close to the ages of the characters past and present in this book. That was not intentional, but pretty cool!

    I didn't remember much more than the basics after all these years, but even with that, my original review below stands.

    What I will add is that this book is much more dark,

    Re-read update - April 2017:

    "He thrusts his fists against the posts and still insists he sees the ghosts"

    I find it appropriate that I first read this between the ages of 12 and 15 and now I re-read at 39. This is pretty close to the ages of the characters past and present in this book. That was not intentional, but pretty cool!

    I didn't remember much more than the basics after all these years, but even with that, my original review below stands.

    What I will add is that this book is much more dark, twisted, and disturbing than I remember. Pure evil like puss oozes out from between the words. Stephen King'King's mind - truly scary and Derry - not somewhere I am ever going on vacation!

    Original review:

    This is one of the essential King reads - it is quite a big one, though!

    I once heard that Stephen King felt he shoved so much into it he should have called it "shIT" - (can't remember where I read that and I cannot find the reference at the moment, so maybe this is just a really cool myth)

    I read this book years ago - I was in my early teens - so I was not much older than the main characters. Because of that, I think the terror was more real.

    I also remember that this book had some of the most terrifying and heart-wrenching scenes I have ever read.

    I will say that the one element of it that struck me as odd and that I still scratch my head at today is the

    . It was a bit uncomfortable and gratuitous.

    I may not recommend that you start with this book if you are interested in King. But, if you believe you have reached the point of becoming a King fan and have not read this yet - you really should!

  • Khanh (the meanie)
    Apr 07, 2013

    I'm not easily scared these days. As a grown woman, the only thing that brings the feeling of dread into my heart is the constant pinging of new work emails requiring my attention when I'm at home, but there was a time when I was a shy, delicate, sweet little girl who was scared of my own shadow.

    Proof: not exactly the terror you see haunting the hallowed halls of Goodreads handing out 1 stars like they're candy these days.

    It wasn't until I was around 20 that I outgrew my fear of scary creatures

    I'm not easily scared these days. As a grown woman, the only thing that brings the feeling of dread into my heart is the constant pinging of new work emails requiring my attention when I'm at home, but there was a time when I was a shy, delicate, sweet little girl who was scared of my own shadow.

    Proof: not exactly the terror you see haunting the hallowed halls of Goodreads handing out 1 stars like they're candy these days.

    It wasn't until I was around 20 that I outgrew my fear of scary creatures and things, and stopped tucking in my toes between the blankets, lest they get eaten by monsters, but before that happened...there was

    . I can say with complete confidence that this goddamn book (and the movie) scarred me for life.

    A sentiment that I'm sure many of you who have read the book and seen the movie echoes.

    I remember the exact moment I saw this movie. It's not something one forgets.

    I was 16 years old. I was in Academic Decathlon competition in high school, and after studying for the competition, our little group decided on a movie night. The selection: Stephen King's

    .

    From the moment that goddamn clown popped up on the screen from beneath the sewer, I knew this was a terrible, no-good, bad idea. I spent the rest of the movie hovering on the edge of my seat, crouched between my best friends, hands either over my eyes or clamped over my mouth to suppress my screams.

    I went home. I didn't sleep that night. Neither did I get much sleep for the next two weeks. A few months later, it was winter. Spirit of the season. Clowns can't haunt me when it's Christmas, right? I was brave enough to actually

    the book this time.

    Bad idea.

    So in closing, damn you, Stephen King. Out of all your books, this one has scarred me most.

    These days, I maintain a terror of two things: mummies (long story), and clowns. I can no longer visit theme parks at Halloween.

    Thank you, Mr. King. You shouldn't have. No, you really shouldn't have.

  • Franco  Santos
    Apr 22, 2014

    es una de mis obras favoritas de King. Y, para mí, la mejor.

    Tenemos a un grupo de amigos, los autodenominados Los Perdedores, integrado por William «Bill» Denbrough, Benjamin «Ben» Hanscom, Beverly «Bev» Marsh, Richard «Richie» Tozier, Edward «Eddie» Kaspbrak, Michael «Mike» Hanlon y Stanley «Stan» Uris. Son chicos marginados, víctimas del acoso escolar y de la xenofobia. Son amigos que por separado pueden parecer débiles, pero juntos forman una fortaleza inquebrantable. Así se enfrent

    es una de mis obras favoritas de King. Y, para mí, la mejor.

    Tenemos a un grupo de amigos, los autodenominados Los Perdedores, integrado por William «Bill» Denbrough, Benjamin «Ben» Hanscom, Beverly «Bev» Marsh, Richard «Richie» Tozier, Edward «Eddie» Kaspbrak, Michael «Mike» Hanlon y Stanley «Stan» Uris. Son chicos marginados, víctimas del acoso escolar y de la xenofobia. Son amigos que por separado pueden parecer débiles, pero juntos forman una fortaleza inquebrantable. Así se enfrentarán a los chicos que los hostigan por ser diferentes, liderados por los crueles Henry Bowers y Patrick Hockstetter. Simultaneamente, desafiaran a Eso.

    Eso es un ser que despierta, aproximadamente, cada 25 años para alimentarse. El primer tiempo transcurre en 1957/1958, años en los que despierta nuevamente cobrándose su primera víctima, George, el hermano menor de Bill. Y ahí es donde comienza la historia. Pennywise eligió un mal momento para regresar, ya que se va a tener que enfrentar a Los Perdedores, ese peculiar grupo de amigos que lo tratará de derrotar y así impedir que siga asesinando.

    El segundo tiempo transcurre en 1985, cuando los chicos ya son adultos y Mike Hanlon, por una promesa realizada en 1958, les escribe diciéndoles que Eso ha vuelto. Por lo tanto se ven obligados a volver a Derry, al lugar donde comenzó todo, para esta vez derrotarlo por siempre y evitar que siga haciendo más daño.

    El libro es una completa obra maestra. Resalta por ser una de las historias más terroríficas de Stephen King. Es una joya del género de terror y de la literatura en general. Su edición de bolsillo consta de 1504 páginas y ninguna tiene desperdicio. Los personajes están excelsamente desarrollados, lo que hace imposible no sentirlos como reales, lo que hace imposible separarse de ellos. En cuanto al ritmo narrativo, es lento y, en algunas partes, pesado. Esto no es un defecto, sino lo contrario: una muestra de un armado minucioso que absorberá en la historia hasta al más receloso lector.

    Con respecto al final tengo que decir que me dejó al borde de las lágrimas. King suele fallar con sus cierres, pero, en mi opinión, este es la excepción.

    «Tal vez no existen los buenos y los malos amigos; tal vez solo hay amigos, gente que nos apoya cuando sufrimos y que nos ayuda a no sentirnos tan solos. Tal vez siempre vale la pena sentir miedo por ellos, y esperanzas, y vivir por ellos. Tal vez también valga la pena morir por ellos, si así debe ser. No hay buenos amigos, no hay malos amigos. Solo hay personas con las que uno quiere estar, necesita estar; gente que construyó su casa en nuestro corazón».

    Los Perdedores es un grupo entrañable. Son chicos inseguros de sí mismos, llenos de problemas, de adversidades, de sufrimiento, y juntos logran encontrar una salida entre tanta injusticia. Unidos se sienten especiales, pero no en el mal sentido, juntos le encuentran otro significado a la palabra especial. Jamás me olvidaré de Bill, Ben, Stan, Bev, Eddie, Mike y Richie. Me enseñaron a cómo ver la vida. A enfrentarme a ella sin miedo, pero sabiendo bien mis límites. Que no es necesario compartir sangre para ser familia. Que no es necesario ser perfecto para ser feliz. Que estar rodeado de lo que te hace bien es la mejor manera de afrontar lo que te hace mal. Esos amigos me enseñaron que cualquiera puede ser un héroe, siempre y cuando se tenga el apoyo correcto. La vida es luz, y esa luz son todas las cosas que te hacen bien, el resto es oscuridad.

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  • Alejandro
    Aug 04, 2014

    It's kinda..."funny" how such characters that they are supposed to make us laugh, you can find just too much examples of "evil clowns", many from fantasy but even at least one from horrific reality, that you wouldn't want to meet in a dark alley...or any place at all!!!

    The Joker, Stitches, Homie from

    , Punchinello from Dean Koontz's

    , The Killer Klowns from

    It's kinda..."funny" how such characters that they are supposed to make us laugh, you can find just too much examples of "evil clowns", many from fantasy but even at least one from horrific reality, that you wouldn't want to meet in a dark alley...or any place at all!!!

    The Joker, Stitches, Homie from

    , Punchinello from Dean Koontz's

    , The Killer Klowns from Outer Space,

    's Robot Clowns,

    's Violator, Rob Zombie's Captain Spaulding, Fucko from the film

    , The Clown Doll from the film

    , also the quite recently Twisty from the Fourth Season of

    , and even John Wayne Gacy aka The Killer Clown.

    And those are only the examples that came easier to my mind and that I watched or read about at some point. So, why society is so inclined to accept and being really scared of a kind of character that was supposed to make us laugh? Of course, if they are chasing us with butcher knives, that helps to input the scary factor, but be honest, even in the first moment that you watch them, before they would do anything nasty, you are already scared with them. They look terrifying!

    Just like the one that it's breathing behind you right now...

    Sorry for the lie on the last line of the previous section. But it was just to introduce the most powerful element of this novel... the lies. I think that Stephen King, showed us how powerful can be the lies.

    The Losers Club were lying themselves pretending that nothing unusual happened on their childhoods. Even some of them were keep lying to themselves that their adult lives were okay. Lying in such powerful way that their memories are fractured.

    The people of Derry were lying themselves about the sexual preferences of some of their fellow neighbours.

    The town's Police officers are lying on their reports.

    Some moms were lying that their children had some illness.

    Pennywise is lying about ITs own appearance to everybody.

    Lies, lies, lies, some of us prefer to lie ourselves than facing our lives. The temptation of lying and creating false "realities" instead of dealing with the harsh truths. Lying ourselves instead of facing the monsters in our lives. Even sometimes, lying ourselves that we should deal with the monsters alone when there are people around us willing to help us, if we just tell the truth.

  • Colleen Hoover
    Apr 05, 2017

    Fuck you, Stephen King. WHY WOULD YOU DO THIS TO US?


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