The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weisberger

The Devil Wears Prada

A delightfully dishy novel about the all-time most impossible boss in the history of impossible bosses. Andrea Sachs, a small-town girl fresh out of college, lands the job “a million girls would die for.” Hired as the assistant to Miranda Priestly, the high-profile, fabulously successful editor of "Runway "magazine, Andrea finds herself in an office that shouts "Prada! Arm...

Title:The Devil Wears Prada
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:0307275558
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:432 pages

The Devil Wears Prada Reviews

  • Jack
    Jul 23, 2007

    Not bad, I suppose—especially interesting when compared to the film adaptation, which I'd seen first.

    The movie was no great shakes, really, although the cast did a solid job with what they'd been given. Still, I sought out the book because I felt that, as with most film adaptations, a lot of depth had probably been jettisoned, and rightly so, in the translation to the screen. After all, a novel can tackle a lot more than two hours of screen time can.

    Imagine my surprise to find that the movie had

    Not bad, I suppose—especially interesting when compared to the film adaptation, which I'd seen first.

    The movie was no great shakes, really, although the cast did a solid job with what they'd been given. Still, I sought out the book because I felt that, as with most film adaptations, a lot of depth had probably been jettisoned, and rightly so, in the translation to the screen. After all, a novel can tackle a lot more than two hours of screen time can.

    Imagine my surprise to find that the movie had

    depth than the novel did. One of the most charming and fully-realized characters (relatively speaking, here) in the movie was nothing more than a throwaway gay joke in the book. And whereas there's growth and change among most of the major players in the movie, the novel pays only lip service to "your characters must change by the end of the book," and then only to the protagonist, whose "change" is telegraphed from page 1. The boss, the "devil" of the title, remains exactly the same from beginning to end—possibly intentionally, but I thought the Hollywood treatment of her, though formulaic, was more satisfying.

    These things would have cheesed me off more if I hadn't discovered that the whole thing was written by a 22-year-old, because lord knows I never could have written something as impressive as this at that age, so I'm willing to cut a great deal of slack. And the truth is, it

    an enjoyable read on a page-to-page basis, even if the whole book isn't altogether satisfying. Empty calories.

  • Belinda
    Jul 25, 2007

    The only reason I waste words on this piece of trash is that it holds the distinction of being THE WORST BOOK I EVER READ. The title was held previously (for a good 15 years previously) by "The Bridges of Madison County," and it took some DOING to surpass that awfulness.

    I could write for three days about how much I hated this book. I still can't believe I finished it, and the only explanation I have is that it was kind of like not being able to look away from a trainwreck. Actually, "trainwreck"

    The only reason I waste words on this piece of trash is that it holds the distinction of being THE WORST BOOK I EVER READ. The title was held previously (for a good 15 years previously) by "The Bridges of Madison County," and it took some DOING to surpass that awfulness.

    I could write for three days about how much I hated this book. I still can't believe I finished it, and the only explanation I have is that it was kind of like not being able to look away from a trainwreck. Actually, "trainwreck" is a compliment to this thing. It assumes that it was, at some point, on track.

    Not so. Bleah.

  • Jennifer
    Sep 21, 2007

    This is one of the only books I have ever read in my entire life where the film actually improved my perception. It took me about three years to read this, and the only reason I ever finished it was because everyone else seemed to think it was so great, I thought I must be missing something.

    I am generally bothered by books and films wherein the main character is offered an incredible opportunity, but because they are worried they are sacrificing themselves, they toss it out the window. (I am wi

    This is one of the only books I have ever read in my entire life where the film actually improved my perception. It took me about three years to read this, and the only reason I ever finished it was because everyone else seemed to think it was so great, I thought I must be missing something.

    I am generally bothered by books and films wherein the main character is offered an incredible opportunity, but because they are worried they are sacrificing themselves, they toss it out the window. (I am willing to add the film "What a Girl Wants" to this general category). I had no sympathy for the lead character in this novel... if she had true sense of self, she could keep her job while not becoming her boss.

    While I realize that these stories are supposed to be inspirational tales of right triumphing, I always feel vaguely disgusted when I finish them-- to a great extent, they remind me of what we are told at the beginning of law school. If you go into your first year with good morals, an awareness of right and wrong, and a need to help people, you can come out of law school and make a difference, despite the grueling courses and backstabbing classmates. If, however, you are scum, law school will refine your techniques.

    If the heroine in Prada was truly strong, she would not have had to sell her soul, she could have kept the job and realised it was just that... A JOB.

    Just plain disappointing. Do yourself a favour... if you feel you MUST muddle through this, rent the movie. Streep plays a truly inspired bitch.

  • Erica
    Oct 14, 2007

    this book blows. it's poorly written, the author uses the same words over and over, characters just do things at random and don't seem to have identifiable personalities of their own. if i was still in 5th grade and decided to write a book about working at a fashion magazine when i'm all grown up, this is what it would be like. i hate that the girl who wrote this is probably a millionaire. i'd like to hit her with a rock. as far as i can figure, it gets one star because she bothered to type it i

    this book blows. it's poorly written, the author uses the same words over and over, characters just do things at random and don't seem to have identifiable personalities of their own. if i was still in 5th grade and decided to write a book about working at a fashion magazine when i'm all grown up, this is what it would be like. i hate that the girl who wrote this is probably a millionaire. i'd like to hit her with a rock. as far as i can figure, it gets one star because she bothered to type it instead of giving it to us in the original crayon on big white pieces of paper format.

  • Michelle
    Oct 29, 2007

    A woman came up to me while I was reading this book and said, "Oh, how is that book? I've been meaning to read it." I answered, "Um, well, it's kind of fun." She raised her eyebrows at me. "I see." I added, "I wouldn't pay full price for it. I got it on sale for, like, a dollar." She nodded as she began to walk away, "Okay, I know what you're saying."

    I can explain more if you still feel like reading this book. Honestly, I won't stop you from reading The Devil Wears Prada, I just don't suggest yo

    A woman came up to me while I was reading this book and said, "Oh, how is that book? I've been meaning to read it." I answered, "Um, well, it's kind of fun." She raised her eyebrows at me. "I see." I added, "I wouldn't pay full price for it. I got it on sale for, like, a dollar." She nodded as she began to walk away, "Okay, I know what you're saying."

    I can explain more if you still feel like reading this book. Honestly, I won't stop you from reading The Devil Wears Prada, I just don't suggest you push off absolutely everything else in order to do it. There are many, many more worthy books.

    The main character, Andrea/Andy, is just really not likeable. I wish she was. I kept trying to see her point of view. But she really bothered me. She had a great opportunity to get into the publishing business, fashion business, or whatever else. She just had to hold out for a year. Fine, she's getting four or five hours of sleep a night. I really don't care. Fine, her boss is ridiculous. But Andrea defiantly sighs at her to show her how she feels, which really, just makes her a big baby. I didn't like a lot of the people I worked for, but if you're a hardworker, you're not going to huff and puff to prove your point that all of this is beneath you. You're going to suck it up and do it. Andrea acts like the super expensive, fashionable clothes that everybody wears are ridiculous, and yes, she sells what she has at the end, but she also puts down Franco Sarto shoes and Ann Taylor (or was it Express?), which made Andy pretty hard to relate to since most people reading the book are probably wearing those things. She doesn't treat her best friend well the entire time, which okay, sometimes these things get left behind when you're busy, but come on, she was an alcoholic. Pull it together, Andy, and be a friend. And when she tells off Miranda at the end, God, I really think the author was going for that whole, Yeah, sock it to her, Andy! thing, but that's really not how I felt. I wanted to tell Andy to grow up. Wouldn't a decent person and adult have said, "Look, Miranda, my friend has been in an accident. I'm sorry if you want me to stay, but I have to go." Which, okay, that's not the best ending either, but really, don't bring up the whole friend in an accident thing, and then have Andy blow up and quit because she couldn't get Miranda's two kids some passports. (Yes, I understand that in the back of her head Andy was probably upset about her friend, but that really didn't come out at all.) There's a lot more to complain about, but really, do I have to say anything else?

    Weak.

  • Samantha
    Jan 28, 2008

    The book

    Andrea has a steady boyfriend Ales, and lives with her best friend from childhood, Lily

    Takes the job because it's the only magazine in New York that offered an interview

    Puts her personal life on hold to be the beck-and-call girl for a Bitch

    Meets a hot writer who is totally jonesing for her and offers her several opportunities to,

    improve her social standing

    She kinda ignores her failing love life and her best friend's alcohol addiction until it's too late to reverse either

    Goes to Paris with Miranda because the Sr. Assistant gets Mono

    When is Paris she gets the call that her best friend's drinking caused a terrible accident and she must come home

    Finally has her fill and tells Miranda off, then gets fired

    Kinda blah ending in which she gets freelance work and gets to waltz back into the

    office for a potential writing assignment

    The movie

    Andrea lives with her boyfriend, and has a small group of friends, one of which happens to be a black girl we could assume is Lily

    Takes the job because it was available

    Puts her personal life on hold to be the beck-and-call girl for a Bitch

    Meets a hot writer who keeps popping up in her life when she desperately needs help and a little pick me up, flirt-wise

    Her boyfriend eventually gets fed up and sorta calls for a 'break'

    Goes to Paris with Miranda because the Sr. Assistant gets hit by a car and is then fired (by Andrea) because her mind is too adled when sick at an event to immediately recall a guest's name

    Discovers a plot to overthrow Miranda (after she recently viewed a vunerable side) and does her best to warn her, only to learn Miranda knew all along and didn't need her help. This is when she decides she's had enough and litterally walks off the job

    Happy ending ensues with her getting a crap job and, unknowingly is seen by Miranda, who approves of her own fashion sense

  • Darth J
    Jul 23, 2015

    3.5 stars

    The premise of this novel as most know it is

    , but I think that is both an unfair assumption and oversimplification. Little background is given of the title character other than she grew up in a lower class family, changed her name, and worked her way up the corporate ladder to her current position as editor-in-chief. The audience isn’t given much more than that to round out her character, though Meryl Streep gives her

    3.5 stars

    The premise of this novel as most know it is

    , but I think that is both an unfair assumption and oversimplification. Little background is given of the title character other than she grew up in a lower class family, changed her name, and worked her way up the corporate ladder to her current position as editor-in-chief. The audience isn’t given much more than that to round out her character, though Meryl Streep gives her depth in the movie adaptation—which isn’t saying much since Streep could star in the biography of a paper bag and still win an Oscar. #Queen

    Instead, we see

    Miranda Priestly through the doe eyes of Andrea “Andy” Sachs, who doesn’t realize that perhaps

    is the real antagonist of the novel. Through her own confession she has no clue about the company nor her potential boss when she takes on the role of Miranda’s 2nd assistant, nor does she seem to really care. While her coworkers at

    are said to be vapid and stuck up, they have a much better work ethic than the lazy Andy who complains about every part of her job (except all the perks, of which there are plenty). She is ungrateful for the experience and the contacts she gains while doing Miranda’s errands, instead she focuses on moaning about having to actually earn her dues. I see her as an unreliable narrator since nearly all of her commentary comes from the place of entitlement.

    Priestly is cast as the villain because she is difficult and demands efficiency, though one could argue that this book wouldn’t be given nearly the mileage or popularity if the accusations hurled against her were by a male main character instead of speshul snowflake Andy. There is a trope in modern culture that women in leadership positions have to fight double standards for acting the same way as their male counterparts, and this is never touched upon in the novel. Can Miranda be cold and condescending at times? Yes, however it is important to understand how much she has accomplished, her worth to the magazine and the fashion world, and the respect she has garnered in the industry. She wouldn’t have gotten where she was if she didn’t have talent and gumption.

    If there’s an unlikeable character here, it’s unappreciative Andy who doesn’t like that she has to live outside the bubble she grew up in. While she keeps being reminded that hers is a job that “a million girls would die for” and that working for Miranda for a year would save her 3-5 years of experience elsewhere, she decides to blow up at her boss in the 11th hour. While the author was probably looking for the audience to cheer at the childish outburst of “Fuck you, Miranda.

    .” (p. 342) and the resulting flouncing from Paris, I found this tantrum to be déclassé and further proof of Andy’s wanton unprofessionalism.

  • Carol
    Jun 10, 2016

    I read this a few years ago, and still remember what a rollicking good ride it was. I was mesmerized by the horror. It was like watching a train wreck in slow motion. In a good way, that is. I'm sure there's a good way to watch a train wreck if we think about it long enough.

    In the interest of full disclosure, I spent several years in what we shall charitably call the fashion industry. So young, insecure, underpaid, working for creative tyrants, living on coffee and celery, and not being able to

    I read this a few years ago, and still remember what a rollicking good ride it was. I was mesmerized by the horror. It was like watching a train wreck in slow motion. In a good way, that is. I'm sure there's a good way to watch a train wreck if we think about it long enough.

    In the interest of full disclosure, I spent several years in what we shall charitably call the fashion industry. So young, insecure, underpaid, working for creative tyrants, living on coffee and celery, and not being able to afford the clothes one must wear (and loves) whilst working 12 - 14 hour shifts are familiar memories from my younger days. So is fear of boss after boss after boss. Abject fear. if there was ever a time in your life when you worked in high-end retail or designer fashions, this one's for you.

    I likely will never read another Weisberger novel. I generally eschew chick lit and whiny protagonists. But The Devil Wears Prada was a 5-star read for me.


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