Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Fahrenheit 451

Fahrenheit 451: la temperatura a la que el papel se enciende y arde. Guy Montag es un bombero y el trabajo de un bombero es quemar libros, que están prohibidos porque son causa de discordia y sufrimiento.El Sabueso Mecánico del Departamento de Incendios, armado con una letal inyección hipodérmica, escoltado por helicópteros, está preparado para rastrear a los disidentes qu...

Title:Fahrenheit 451
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:0307347974
Edition Language:Spanish
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:174 pages

Fahrenheit 451 Reviews

  • She-Who-Reads
    Jul 11, 2007

    Somehow, I have gotten through life as an English major, book geek,

    a science-fiction nerd without ever having read this book. I vaguely remember picking it up in high-school and not getting very far with it. It was an interesting premise, but far too depressing for my tastes at the time.

    Fast-forward 15 years later. I just bought a copy the other day to register at BookCrossing for their Banned Books Month release challenge. The ALA celebrates Banned Books Week in September, so one BXer chal

    Somehow, I have gotten through life as an English major, book geek,

    a science-fiction nerd without ever having read this book. I vaguely remember picking it up in high-school and not getting very far with it. It was an interesting premise, but far too depressing for my tastes at the time.

    Fast-forward 15 years later. I just bought a copy the other day to register at BookCrossing for their Banned Books Month release challenge. The ALA celebrates Banned Books Week in September, so one BXer challenged us to wild release books that had at one point or another been banned in this country during the entire month.

    fits the bill -- an irony that is not lost on anyone, I trust. (Everyone knows

    is about the evils of censorship and banning books, right? The title refers to the temperature at which paper burns.)

    I didn't intend to start reading it. I really didn't. Somehow it seduced me into it. I glanced at the first page and before I knew it, it was 1:00 in the morning and I was halfway through with the thing. It's really good! No wonder it's a modern classic. Montag's inner emotional and moral journey from a character who burns books gleefully and with a smile on his face to someone who is willing to risk his career, his marriage, his house, and eventually his life for the sake of books is extremely compelling. That this man, product of a culture that devalues reading and values easy, thoughtless entertainments designed to deaden the mind and prevent serious thought, could come to find literature so essential that he would kill for it...! Something about that really spoke to me.

    It raises the question: why? What is it about books, about poetry, about literature that is so essential to us? There is no doubt in my mind that it

    essential, if not for all individuals (although I find it hard to imagine life without books, I know there are some people who don't read for pleasure, bizarre as that seems to me), then for society. Why should that be? Books don't contain any hard-and-fast answers to all of life's questions. They might contain great philosophical Truths, but only subjectively so -- there will always be someone who will argue and disagree with whatever someone else says. In fact, as Captain Beatty, the evil fire chief, points out, no two books agree with each other. What one says, another contradicts. So what, then, is their allure? What is it that made Mildred's silly friend start to weep when Montag read the poem "Dover Beach" aloud to her? Where does the power of literature come from?

    I think the reason that books are so important to our lives and to the health of our society -- of any society -- is not because they give us answers, but because they make us ask the questions. Books -- good books, the books that stay with you for years after you read them, the books that change your view of the world or your way of thinking -- aren't easy. They aren't facile. They aren't about surface; they're about depth. They are, quite literally, thought-provoking. They require complexity of thought. They require effort on the part of the reader. You get out of a book what you put into the reading of it, and therefore books satisfy in a way that other types of entertainment do not.

    And they aren't mass-produced. They are individual, unique, gloriously singular. They are each an island, much-needed refuges from an increasingly homogeneous culture.

    I'm glad I read

    , even if the ending was rather bleak. It challenged me and made me think, stimulated me intellectually. We could all do with a bit of intellectual stimulation now and then; it makes life much more fulfilling.

  • J.G. Keely
    Oct 25, 2007

    Farenheit 451 has been analyzed and reinterpreted by every successive generation to change its meaning. This is chiefly because the book is full of assumptions and vague symbolism which can be taken many ways, and rarely does anyone come away from the book with the conclusion the author intended, which would suggest that it is a failed attempt.

    There are grounds to contend that even the title is inaccurate, since contemporary sources suggest paper

    , which in Farenhe

    Farenheit 451 has been analyzed and reinterpreted by every successive generation to change its meaning. This is chiefly because the book is full of assumptions and vague symbolism which can be taken many ways, and rarely does anyone come away from the book with the conclusion the author intended, which would suggest that it is a failed attempt.

    There are grounds to contend that even the title is inaccurate, since contemporary sources suggest paper

    , which in Farenheit would be more than 800 degrees. The truth is, paper combustion is gradual and dependent on many factors; even if some paper might combust at 451F, his title is at best an oversimplification, but Bradbury was more interested in a punchy message than in constructing a thoughtful and well-supported argument.

    It's not a book about book censorship, but a book about how TV will rot your brain. Bradbury himself has stated this again and again, as evidenced in

    which quotes Bradbury and in

    from Bradbury's own website--indeed, in an interview, he stated he was inspired to write it because he was horrified

    while walking her dog. Not only does he patronizingly assume that she's listening to a soap opera, instead of news, or appreciating classical music, but it's a strangely anti-technology pose for a sci fi writer to take--does it really matter whether we get our art and knowledge from compressed tree pulp, or from radio transmissions?

    This book falls somewhat short of its satirical mark based on this cranky lawn-loving neighbor's message. Then again, it was written in the course of a few days in one long, uninterrupted slurry (mercifully edited by his publishers, but now available utterly restored). It contains archetypes, misconceptions, and an author surrogate, but can still be seen as a slighting view of authority and power, and of the way people are always willing to deceive themselves.

    Unfortunately, Bradbury did not seem to recognize that reading has always been the province of a minority and that television would do little to kill it. More books are written, published, and read today than at any other point in history. Most of them are just redundant filler, but so is 90% of any mass creative output, books, art, movies, or TV, as Sturgeon

    . And there's nothing new about that, either: cheap, trashy novels have been a joke since the Victorian.

    Television is a different medium than books, and has its own strengths and weaknesses. Bradbury's critique of TV--that it will get larger, more pervasive, and become an escape for small minds--is just as true of books. As for television damaging social interaction, who is less culturally aware: the slack-jawed boy watching television or the slack-jawed boy reading one uninspired relic of genre fiction after another? I read a lot of books as a kid and watched a lot of TV, and each medium provided something different. Neither one displaced the other, since reading and watching aren't the same experience.

    There is an egalitarian obsession that people are all capable of being informed and intelligent. We now send everyone to college, despite the fact that for many people, college is not a viable or useful route. The same elitism that values degrees values being 'well-read', and since this is the elitism of the current power structure, it is idealized by the less fortunate subcultures. Bradbury became informed not because he read, but by what he read. He could have read a schlocky pop novel every day for life and still been as dull as the vidscreen zombies he condemns.

    He has mistaken the medium for the message, and his is a doubly mixed message, coming from a man who had

    .

  • Tyler
    Dec 28, 2007

    Few appreciate irony as much as I do, so understand that I understand this review. The message of this book is decent: knowledge should not be censored. However, the rest of the book is utter shit. I found myself actually screaming at several points as Bradbury spent minutes and dozens of metaphors and allusions referring to one insignificant detail of the plot. It is too damn flowery to be understandable by anyone! In other words, an English teacher's dream. In addition, the story was about the

    Few appreciate irony as much as I do, so understand that I understand this review. The message of this book is decent: knowledge should not be censored. However, the rest of the book is utter shit. I found myself actually screaming at several points as Bradbury spent minutes and dozens of metaphors and allusions referring to one insignificant detail of the plot. It is too damn flowery to be understandable by anyone! In other words, an English teacher's dream. In addition, the story was about the message not the story in and of itself. Those of you who know me understand that this is that I detest most about classics, tied with how everyone reveres them without reading them.

    The Coda and Afterword just add to the confuse making me confused on whether Bradbury is a very hateful man or just a hypocrite. The main plot of the novel itself is that the majority rule canceled out intellectualism while in the Coda (maybe Afterword, I don't remember which was which) Bradbury blasts minorities (all, including racial, religious, etc.) for creating an overly sensitive society. Oddly enough, his heroes are the minority. Ha. Furthermore, the Coda is a hefty "Fuck you" to anyone that wants to critique his work in any way not positive. Therefore, I feel obliged to respond in turn: "Fuck you, Ray Bradbury. Your writing style is shit and I won't force it on my worst enemy." Harsh, I know, but true. If you do need to read this book, I suggest a Cliff Notes version as long as you can appreciate that irony.

  • Brian
    Jan 23, 2009

    I am in 6th grade. My Language Arts teacher assigns us a book report; tells us we can choose the book but that our grade will be based on the maturity of the novel the report is based upon.

    My mother and I are in K-mart. I've mentioned to her about this book report to be done, and so before we leave with a basket filled with clothes I know I will be embarrassed to wear, we stop by the rack of books. She selects a few pulp paperback titles, throws them into the cart.

    A few days later she hands me

    I am in 6th grade. My Language Arts teacher assigns us a book report; tells us we can choose the book but that our grade will be based on the maturity of the novel the report is based upon.

    My mother and I are in K-mart. I've mentioned to her about this book report to be done, and so before we leave with a basket filled with clothes I know I will be embarrassed to wear, we stop by the rack of books. She selects a few pulp paperback titles, throws them into the cart.

    A few days later she hands me

    . "I've read those books I purchased," she says. "I think this is the best of the bunch. You should like it."

    I am skeptical. When does a 12 year-old boy like anything that his mother does? I admit to myself that the cover looks really awesome - a black suited, menacing man shooting flames over something that looks like books. I give it a go.

    Tearing through the pages, the chapters, the three sections, I finish it over a weekend and am in awe. A fireman that starts fires? Books are outlawed? I look at the small library that I've had since childhood; a shelf of about 30 books. They now look to my 12 year old eyes as books of a child.

    is the book that launched me from childhood, my first book dealing with the adult world.

    I ask my mother to box up my old books and put them in the attic. I am proud to start a new library with this novel as my first edition. I carefully, lovingly, sign my name on the inside cover. Let the firemen come, I think, I am proud to be a book-reader.

    I continue to read this book again and again through the years. I enroll in a college course at Penn State my freshman year, simply because this book is on the course materials. I memorized the entire poem

    because it is the selection Bradbury chose to have Montag read aloud to his wife and her friends. As the years roll by, and I age through my 20s and 30s, I noticed that fewer and fewer of the people I know read any books. Even my avid reading friends from childhood moved on to their careers, their marriages, their children. In the late 1990s a friend invited me to his house to show off a proud new purchase - a television screen the size of one of his walls. I mention how frightening this was, that he was basically mainlining Bradbury's foreshadowing. He handed me a beer and fired up

    ; told me to relax. I watched the movie and felt like a traitor.

    The last time I read F451 was about 10 years ago - I think I was afraid that if I were to pick it up again that it would diminish in its importance to me - much like

    and

    . But on this first day in May I have a day-trip to Socal for business and I bring this book with me. And I love it, all over again, as if reading it for the first time. Until

    came along, this was my favorite book. I remember why.

    I joined Goodreads in 2009 with low expectations. I am not a social media person. I've given up twice on Facebook; the last time for good. But there was something I found here that reminded me of Montag's joining the campfire of fellow readers. We may all be from different walks of life from places all around the world, but we come here often and with excitement - because we love books. They are some of the most important things to us and our lives would be ruined without them.

    So to you, my fellow Goodreaders, tonight I raise a glass to each of you, and I want to say thank you thank you thank you for making my life better, for exposing me to authors I would have never known, and for reminding me that although I'll never get to all of the books I want to read in this life, I can stand on the shoulders of you giants and witness more of the wonders of the written word.

  • Emily May
    Aug 21, 2012

    As I write this review, the year is 2012. We do not live in a perfect world; in fact, in many ways we don't even live in a good world. But one thing I believe with all my heart is that we live in a world which, on the whole, is better than it was fifty years ago. Now, I know I'm writing with limited perspective and that progression and development hasn't been the same all over the globe and even the definition of those words can change depending on what part of the world you live in. But here's

    As I write this review, the year is 2012. We do not live in a perfect world; in fact, in many ways we don't even live in a good world. But one thing I believe with all my heart is that we live in a world which, on the whole, is better than it was fifty years ago. Now, I know I'm writing with limited perspective and that progression and development hasn't been the same all over the globe and even the definition of those words can change depending on what part of the world you live in. But here's what I do know: the average world life expectancy is higher, the infant mortality rate is lower, access to education is greater and the amount of countries that hold regular, fair elections has increased.

    On average, people today are smarter than they were fifty years ago. And I know this is where older generations throw up their hands in indignation and start yelling about how exams were much harder in "their day" and they really had to work for it. I am not disputing this, I have no idea if it's true or not. But what is true is that more people today than ever before are going on to further education after high school, the barriers that once stopped the working class from being as smart as society's more privileged members are slowly starting to break down bit by bit. Literacy rates have been on the rise the whole world over:

    It's true. We have entered the age of computers and electronics, social networking and personal media players... and the world has not ended, the robots haven't taken over and people haven't become so stupid that they feel the need to rage a war against books. And this is the main reason why I think Bradbury's dystopian tale is out of date and ineffective. The author was writing at a time when technology was really starting to get funky, the digital age was still decades away but people were doing all kinds of crazy things like listening to music with little cones plugged into their ears. Bizarre.

    Readers often choose to view Bradbury's story as one about censorship instead of technology because that allows a more modern reader to connect with the world portrayed. But taken as it was intended, I just don't share the author's sentiments. Not all technology is good, but I'm of the opinion that the good outweighs the bad: medical advancements, entertainment, access to information via the internet... I'm the very opposite of a technophobe because, in my opinion, forward is the way to go. And I'm sure it's because of the age I was born into, but I cannot relate to the apprehension that Bradbury feels when he tells of this true story (note: this is not in the book):

    I know many still think today that we are becoming a completely unsociable species because of mobile/cell phones, social networking sites, etc. but I have made friends from all over the world thanks to technology. I have talked to people that fifty years ago I would never have known, I have learned about different cultures and ways of life because I have access to most areas of the world through the web. So, no, I'm not scared of this so-called technological threat that is somehow going to turn our brains to mush and create a society where we cannot concentrate long enough to read a book. And here is where I (finally) get on to details of this novel.

    What I am supposed to believe in here is that - because of technology - humanity has become so stupid that they couldn't concentrate on books. So books were simplified at first for easier understanding, then banned, then burnt. Why? I am okay with the realistic aspect of "people have short attention spans because of technology so they don't want to read books", but why burn books? I don't see why this would need to happen and why it would become a criminal offense to have books in your home. This is where I understand why so many people prefer to apply this novel's message to censorship, because it works so much better that way. The argument for the technological side of it is weak - even for the time in question.

    The best thing about this whole book is the discussion about the phoenix and the comparisons made between the legendary bird and humanity: in the same way that the bird dies in flames only to be reborn again from the ashes, humanity constantly repeats mistakes made throughout history and never seems to learn from them. Secondly, to give credit where it's due, the writing is suitably creepy for a dystopian society and I understand why people who do actually share Bradbury's concerns would be caught up in the novel's atmosphere. But, overall, this wasn't a great dystopian work for me, I didn't agree with the point it was trying to sell me and I don't think it made a very successful case for it. Furthermore, I had some problems with the pacing. The book is split into three parts and the first two are much slower and uneventful than the last one - which seems to explode with a fast sequence of events in a short amount of time and pages. Disappointing.

  • Huda Yahya
    Aug 25, 2012
  • Fabian
    Sep 26, 2014

    "We are living in a time when flowers are trying to live on flowers, instead of growing on good rain & black loam." (111)

    What outstanding prose--prophetic, which is by far the most rare and inspiring of attributes a work of literature can ever possess. And Ray "I Don't Talk Things, Sir. I Talk The Meaning Of Things" Bradbury is here at his absolute best. I cannot decide whether this or "Martian Chronicles" is my favorite... they are definitely my favorite of his, the best possible in scifi a

    "We are living in a time when flowers are trying to live on flowers, instead of growing on good rain & black loam." (111)

    What outstanding prose--prophetic, which is by far the most rare and inspiring of attributes a work of literature can ever possess. And Ray "I Don't Talk Things, Sir. I Talk The Meaning Of Things" Bradbury is here at his absolute best. I cannot decide whether this or "Martian Chronicles" is my favorite... they are definitely my favorite of his, the best possible in scifi adventure.

    This is "The Giver" for adults--Here, another example of overpraised books that shockingly do live up to the hype. It's a resplendent petition for life, beauty, & literature; an AMEN for The Book's very core of existence... THE BOOK that actually worships other BOOKS (like The Bible does with God). Personal events and not the battlefields of Tolkien-sized scope (I mean small occurrences such as breakdowns, unpleasant jobs, below-par relationships...) tightens the razor-sharp string of terror; a severe lack of details is a tenacious and masterful way to portray this post-apocalyptic nightmare in the most disconcerting way. (If you are a lover of books, this seems like some Dantean form of poetic retribution!)

    "451" is an example of when planets aligned just right and gave the writer a light for him to share. This, a writer's "capacity for collecting metaphors" is absolutely enthralling. I am amazed!

    A PLUS: read the edition with the 3 introductions by the inspiring Bradbury (there are 451 printings or so of this novel after all) and save a couple bucks in a creative writing class. His writing tips are genuinely far-out!

  • Helen Stavraki
    Oct 29, 2016

    ~Φαρενάιτ 451~

    "η θερμοκρασία στην οποία το χαρτί των βιβλίων πιάνει φωτιά και καίγεται..."

    Ο άνθρωπος των βιβλιοθηκών,αυτοχαρακτηρίζεται ο συγγραφέας αυτός με την απίστευτη διορατικότητα. Αυτός ο δυστοπικός επαναστάτης έγραψε ένα τόσο

    φανταστικό-αλληγορικό αριστούργημα που καταλήγει να είναι επιλήψιμα ρεαλιστικό και τρομακτικά διαχρονικό.

    Μια αφήγηση συναρπαστική,γεμάτη ανατροπές και ανατριχιαστικές εκφάνσεις της ανθρώπινης πορείας και εξέλιξης, και ένα τέλος θλιβερά ελπιδοφόρο και ποιητικά αντισ

    ~Φαρενάιτ 451~

    "η θερμοκρασία στην οποία το χαρτί των βιβλίων πιάνει φωτιά και καίγεται..."

    Ο άνθρωπος των βιβλιοθηκών,αυτοχαρακτηρίζεται ο συγγραφέας αυτός με την απίστευτη διορατικότητα. Αυτός ο δυστοπικός επαναστάτης έγραψε ένα τόσο

    φανταστικό-αλληγορικό αριστούργημα που καταλήγει να είναι επιλήψιμα ρεαλιστικό και τρομακτικά διαχρονικό.

    Μια αφήγηση συναρπαστική,γεμάτη ανατροπές και ανατριχιαστικές εκφάνσεις της ανθρώπινης πορείας και εξέλιξης, και ένα τέλος θλιβερά ελπιδοφόρο και ποιητικά αντισυμβατικό.

    Σύγχρονη,εξελιγμένη μορφή ζωής και ανθρωπίνων σχέσεων.

    Κύριο συστατικό της ευτυχίας των μεταλλαγμένων ανθρώπων; Η αυταπάτη. Η κενοδοξία. Η άγνοια που σε προχωρημένο βαθμό θεωρείται «αρετή».

    Η νοσηρότητα σε πνεύμα και σώμα. Τα ηλίθια κολλημένα μυαλά που παύουν να σκέφτονται για να μην χαλάσουν την ειδυλλιακή εικονική ευδαιμονία τους.

    Πρωταγωνιστής ο πυρονόμος Γκάι Μόνταγκ,ο οποίος λειτουργεί μηχανικά και σπασμωδικά χωρίς μνήμη και αισθήματα.

    Μέσα στο σπίτι του υπάρχουν υπερσύγχρονες εγκαταστάσεις αποχαύνωσης και αυτοματοποίησης και μια σύζυγος που παραληρεί ανάμεσα στην εικονική πραγματικότητα που της προσφέρουν οι γιγαντοοθόνες βίντεοσκουπιδιών και τα υπνωτικά χάπια.

    Έξω απο το σπίτι είναι επιφορτισμένος με το σπουδαίο καθήκον της εργασίας του: ΚΑΙΕΙ ΒΙΒΛΙΑ.

    Με αυτόν τον τρόπο διατηρείται η τάξη και η αρμονία.

    Τα βιβλία γενικά και κάθε είδους,φιλοσοφικά,επιστημονικά,ποιητικά,

    λογοτεχνικά,

    θρησκευτικά

    σε κάνουν να σκέφτεσαι.

    Άρα σε κάνουν να υπάρχεις. Να προβληματίζεσαι. Να ονειρεύεσαι. Να λυπάσαι. Να εξελίσσεσαι. Να αυτοδημιουργείσαι. Να συγκρίνεις. Να βλέπεις.

    Εκπέμπουν το απόλυτο φως.

    Τόσο απόλυτο και λευκό που πονάς απο την ακτινοβολία.

    Επομένως οι ανεξέλεγκτες κυβερνήσεις για να προστατέψουν τους πολίτες τους απο όλα τα βάσανα και τους πόνους αρχίζουν καταρχάς να λογοκρίνουν.

    Κατά δεύτερον,προσφέρουν αφειδώς θεάματα,μουσική,διαφημίσεις,περιοδικά και εκπομπές στα ΜΜΕ που χαλαρώνουν τον κόσμο και φυσικά περιορίζουν τη δημιουργικότητα,τη φαντασία και την ελευθερία.

    Δεν υπάρχουν ατομικά δικαιώματα-δεν υπάρχουν προβλήματα.

    Τόσο απλά.

    Καταπίεση- άγνοια- αυταπάτη-φωτιά.

    Καίνε τα βιβλία γιατί είναι επικίνδυνα για τη δημόσια υγεία.

    Όσοι λίγοι αρνούνται να αποχωριστούν τα βιβλια τους καίγονται μαζί τους και το κακό σταματάει εκεί.

    Ο Γκάι έπειτα απο μια τυχαία γνωριμία με ενα νεαρό κορίτσι που αγαπάει το διαβασμα και γι’αυτό θεωρείται ψυχοπαθής και κάποιον ηλικιωμένο καθηγητή που διατηρεί τη βιβλιοθήκη του στο μυαλό του, αλλάζει ριζικά τρόπο σκέψης και ζωής.

    Σε αυτό το εκπληκτικό ανάγνωσμα αναδεικνύεται το ολόλευκο φως των βιβλίων μέσα απο την κατάμαυρη στάχτη τους.

    Λίγοι αντέχουν το εκτυφλωτικό φως.

    Πολλοί θαυμάζουν τη φλόγα της καύσης στους 451 βαθμούς της κλίμακας Φαρενάιτ,αφού η πνευματική τους αβελτηρία ικανοποιείται με άρτον και θέαμα.

    Οι ελάχιστοι διασώστες βιβλίων και πολιτισμών είναι παρίες και αποδιωγμένοι απο τους νοσηρά ηλίθιους κατασκευασμένους και σύγχρονα κλωνοποιημένους πολίτες.

    Το σοκαριστικό μήνυμα του βιβλίου είναι πως η απονομιμοποίηση των βιβλίων δεν ξεκίνησε μετά απο κάποια κυβερνητική διακύρηξη ή πολιτική επιβολή.

    Το φαινόμενο ξεκίνησε μετά απο το συνδυασμό τεχνικής εξέλιξης των μέσων, χειραγώγησης των μαζών και φανατισμό των εκάστοτε μειονοτήτων.

    Οι κυβερνήσεις βοήθησαν βεβαίως με άπλετη ευχαρίστηση αλλά δεν απαγόρεψαν τα βιβλία.

    Οι ίδιοι οι άνθρωποι,με υποβοηθούμενη βούληση έπαψαν να διαβάζουν για απόλαυση και για γνώση και καλλιέργεια και πνευματικά ταξίδια.

    Μόνοι τους προτίμησαν την επιβαλλόμενη και προβαλλόμενη ψυχαγωγία με μηδέν δείκτη πνευματικότητας.

    Μόνοι τους υποτίμησαν και εξάλειψαν τα βιβλία.

    [Για να μη γίνει ποτέ πια κανείς «το θύμα» ενός πολυδιαβασμένου ανθρώπου...].

    Πολλά έχουν δει τα μάτια μου, μα αυτό μου φέρνει τρόμο....

    Καλή ΑΝΑΓΝΩΣΗ!!!


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