Pet Sematary by Stephen King

Pet Sematary

This is an alternate Cover Edition for ASIN: B00K3NEE56.When the Creeds move into a beautiful old house in rural Maine, it all seems too good to be true: physician father, beautiful wife, charming little daughter, adorable infant son-and now an idyllic home. As a family, they've got it all...right down to the friendly car. But the nearby woods hide a blood-chilling truth-m...

Title:Pet Sematary
Author:
Rating:
Edition Language:English
Number of Pages:580 pages

Pet Sematary Reviews

  • Nikki

    The painful, hard thing about Stephen King's writing is that so often, he takes something real, something that people can experience in the real world, and builds the supernatural stuff onto that. In The Shining, there's Jack's alcoholism; in The Talisman, there's Jack/Jason's mother's cancer; The Stand plays on our fears of something, somewhere, in one of those labs, getting out of control; in Pet Sematary, it's the death of a child. So much of the book is completely real and believable: the ar

    The painful, hard thing about Stephen King's writing is that so often, he takes something real, something that people can experience in the real world, and builds the supernatural stuff onto that. In The Shining, there's Jack's alcoholism; in The Talisman, there's Jack/Jason's mother's cancer; The Stand plays on our fears of something, somewhere, in one of those labs, getting out of control; in Pet Sematary, it's the death of a child. So much of the book is completely real and believable: the arguments between Louis and his wife's parents, Gage running out onto the road and getting himself killed, Louis being willing to do anything to resurrect his son, anything. It's gruesome, because anyone with an ounce of imagination can put themself in that situation, imagine the horrible choice: do I try this and possibly get my son back or possibly create a monster, or do I pass this chance by and never find out whether it could have worked?

    Stephen King is definitely not "just" a horror writer. His horror becomes much more "real" because he is also writing about real things.

    This book hurt the most of the ones of his that he's read, and so it took me longer to get through it. I don't regret it, even if it grossed me out a bit. I think it's pretty brilliant, the ideas and the plot at least. Stephen King is not the most fancy writer in the world, but his prose works and goes down easy, and that makes it good, as far as I'm concerned.

  • Vincent Kaprat

    This may be King's darkest book. If you're goth, read this and you'll be 5% goth'er.

  • Carol

    "Sometimes dead is better".................

    "Sometimes dead is better".................

  • Will M.

    THE ELECTRICITY JUST FLUCTUATED WHILE I WAS WRITING THIS REVIEW. THE LIGHTS WENT BATSHIT CRAZY. WTF IS HAPPENING? I'M NOT KIDDING AROUND, IT'S 6:15PM AND I'M ALONE IN MY ROOM. WHAT DID YOU DO TO ME, KING?

    Louis Creeds moves into a

    old house in Maine with his wife, daughter, son, and cat. It was all normal and perfect at first, but the nearby woods became apparent and so was the Pet Sematary.

    When people regard King as the master of horror, I used to raise an eyebrow. I've read a few o

    THE ELECTRICITY JUST FLUCTUATED WHILE I WAS WRITING THIS REVIEW. THE LIGHTS WENT BATSHIT CRAZY. WTF IS HAPPENING? I'M NOT KIDDING AROUND, IT'S 6:15PM AND I'M ALONE IN MY ROOM. WHAT DID YOU DO TO ME, KING?

    Louis Creeds moves into a

    old house in Maine with his wife, daughter, son, and cat. It was all normal and perfect at first, but the nearby woods became apparent and so was the Pet Sematary.

    When people regard King as the master of horror, I used to raise an eyebrow. I've read a few of his horror books and didn't get scared at all. I read The Shining at 2am with no problems at all. It's all different with Pet Sematary though, because even though I was reading it at 9am, I still got scared. The vibe of the book was authentic horror, and it scared the hell out of me. It took me around 2 days to read this, because I constantly had to stop. First it was 2am, then I tried again at 4 am, but I couldn't read further because I was more worried about ghosts in my room. The next instance was 9am the next morning, but my room was dark and there was a storm going on outside, so I had to stop again. If I'm not that scared of horror, then I would've finished this book in a few hours. Really amazing thing King wrote here.

    In the introduction he said that this is the most frightening book he has written. I haven't read all of his novels yet, but I'm not disagreeing that this was scary as hell. He also stated that he and his wife moved to Maine, with his daughter, son and cat. Does this found familiar? IT'S THE FUCKING SUMMARY AT THE BACK! He also said that his son almost died because he was chasing him and his son apparently went to the road where the ginormous trucks are. But everything after that was made up, Thank God. He is absolutely right when he said that he had gone too far with this one, because he did! I'm not sure if the introduction was just a gimmick to make the novel scarier, but it really did for me. I can't seem to remove the idea that the happenings in the novel might have really happened in King's life. I know it's crazy, but King made me think of those things.

    So we have this cemetery for pets in Maine. It's weird, because why would there be a cemetery exclusively for pets. Louis and his family owns this cat, Church. He's still lurking around the house and very active because they haven't fixed him yet. Louis' neighbor, Jud, warned him that pets and children shouldn't be allowed to play near the streets. Apparently there are ginormous trucks that drive at top speed. The paranormal story begins.

    I honestly don't know how to explain my reaction of the novel without tackling the plot, and the mystery of it. Here's a spoiler tag for those who have read this.

    I think I wrote a really long spoiler tag.

    The ending was epic. I can't complain about that because I really loved it. The whole novel was really amazing for me to begin with. The characters were really likeable, and some were relatable too. I didn't like Jud that much, but everyone else managed to entertain me. The plot was a bit weird/new, and I really like that. This novel is really old, but it's my first time reading it, and it will surely not be the last.

    I really loved this novel. I think this is the only novel I've read that's worthy to be called a horror novel. I used to call King the king of authors, but I think I can finally give him the deserving title of King of Horror. I can't really say though that this is my one and only favorite book of his, because I loved The Stand for a very different reason. There's a bit of a difference, genre-wise, but no matter what, this just became one of my favorites. This is a novel that I'm sure I'll be reading again in the future. I really enjoyed it and I'm highly recommending it to anyone. 5/5 stars, just read it (I hope you don't own a cat).

  • Mario

    Once upon a time when I was a child, I remember talking with my family about horror movies. Somebody asked what was the scariest movie you've watched, and my mom without thinking said

    . I remember laughing and saying

    Fast forward to now, I changed my mind.

    This book is scariest and creepiest book I've ever read, and I'm sure it'll stay number 1 for a long time. It made me think about stuff I don't want, or refuse, to think a

    Once upon a time when I was a child, I remember talking with my family about horror movies. Somebody asked what was the scariest movie you've watched, and my mom without thinking said

    . I remember laughing and saying

    Fast forward to now, I changed my mind.

    This book is scariest and creepiest book I've ever read, and I'm sure it'll stay number 1 for a long time. It made me think about stuff I don't want, or refuse, to think about. One being death. Most of us don't want to think about death, 'cause we think we're invincible... But we're not. Like this book said, Oz the Great and Terrible (or should I say Gweat and Tewwible?) is always close... waiting.

    At few parts I even thought about putting the book down, because it was all too much, but I just couldn't. I wasn't even able to stop reading, 'cause I was dying (no pun intended) to know what was going to happen next. I guess horror books do that do you.

    In conclusion, amazing book, and I'm definitely gonna re-read it in (very,

    distant) future.

  • Khanh (the meanie)

    In my teens, Stephen King has crafted my nightmares. I am masochistically glad to say that in my adulthood, that has not changed.

    He had been responsible for my bedtime routine. Close all doors, bathroom, closet. Check under bed, a terrifying prospect as it stands. Make sure blanket is firmly tucked in at the feet - who knows what creatures might reach up to grab or nibble on them. Make sure blanket is firmly tucked in on all sides, so that only the head is exposed. And still, all that preparation for the battle that is bedtime is nigh useless as the nightlights cast shadows that turn into shadowy creatures in the depths of night. Glints of light cast upon objects are spun by a restless mind into monsters.

    It has been years since I've read a Stephen King book. That's because my attention span is much shorter now. It craves the quick denouément, a fast-paced plot. Action action action. I confess that this book did plod along in some parts for me, but despite all that, there is no doubt in my mind that King is a master at building atmosphere. He is tremendously skilled at crafting characters, at making them human, at making them relatable in their poignancy, with moments like a father explaining the inevitability of death to his young child. I think we can all relate to that moment.

    I would say half the book isn't a horror in a traditional sense, but

    .

    That isn't to say that this book isn't filled with moments that makes a chill run down your spine.

    I've long since outgrown my nightly monster-prepping ritual, but I know tonight I won't be sleeping easily.

  • Matt

    Every Halloween, I like to do a little season’s readings. For most of the year, I generally avoid scary books and movies. Life is scary enough without looking for extra frights. But there’s something about the Fall. Once the wind gets sharp, the days get short, and the leaves start to drop, I inevitably find myself within a small window of time in which horror is appealing. This window closes abruptly at midnight on November 1. Before that time, though, I’m relatively open to the idea of being t

    Every Halloween, I like to do a little season’s readings. For most of the year, I generally avoid scary books and movies. Life is scary enough without looking for extra frights. But there’s something about the Fall. Once the wind gets sharp, the days get short, and the leaves start to drop, I inevitably find myself within a small window of time in which horror is appealing. This window closes abruptly at midnight on November 1. Before that time, though, I’m relatively open to the idea of being terrified by something other than my student loan debt.

    In the past, my choices have bounced between classics (

    ;

    ;

    ) and Stephen King (last year I finally finished

    ). This year, I relied on the water cooler to help me make my pick. As in, I literally asked people at my office’s water cooler for ideas. After awhile, people started avoiding the water cooler, but by that time I had enough anecdotal evidence to choose King’s

    .

    Before I actually opened the cover, I knew very little about

    . What I did know kind of bored me. Pets coming back to life? That’s not scary. My taxes? Now there’s the terror!

    Yet

    is King’s choice for his scariest novel. In his Introduction, he claims that when he finished the book, even he thought he had gone too far. He thought it would never be published. I chuckled a bit when I read this. King is the consummate entertainer, so of course he’d tell that story. His Introduction reminded me of a carnival barker. By the end, though, I sort of agreed with him. This pushes up against the boundaries of what most readers are willing to tolerate in their amusements.

    At 395 pages (in my paperback edition), this is a relatively thin Stephen King book. I don’t think he’d even finished introducing all the characters in

    in 395 pages. (Of course, King reads incredibly fast, so 400 pages feels like half that). Accordingly, this is one of King’s tighter, more efficient stories. There are only a handful of characters, and just a few big set pieces. King only throws a couple punches, but they all land squarely in the groin.

    Things kick off with the Creed family (Louis and Rachel, and their two young kids, Eileen and Gage) arriving at their new home in Maine, after relocating from Chicago. Louis is a doctor who has taken a job with the University of Maine. Their new house is a big and beautiful New England colonial. Its only detriment is its location, right next to a busy road well-traveled by recklessly speeding semi trucks.

    The Creed’s new neighbor is the benignly intrusive Jud Crandall, an old man who steps in to fill the paternal role that Louis missed due to his own father’s premature death. It doesn’t take long for Jud to show Louis some of their new home’s features. Prominent among them is a pet cemetery (the sign reads Pet Sematary). We later learn – again through Jud, who is always there, watching, like Wilson from

    – that beyond the pet cemetery is a Micmac burial ground. Jud tells Louis that his childhood dog was killed in the road. Jud buried the dog in the Micmac burial ground and it came back to life like a canine Lazarus. It was good as new, except it was mean as hell and smelled like death. Did I mention that the Creeds also have a pet?

    is long on setup. It takes its time building to the inevitable consequences of living next to a place that cheats Death. For the first 200 or so pages, not a lot happens, though King generously foreshadows much of what is to follow. At the halfway point, he delivers a shot to the solar plexus with a major twist – followed by two cheap writer’s tricks – all in succession. Starting with this breathless succession, things race straight downhill to the chilling finale.

    The twist itself – which hides in plain sight – is King’s crowning achievement. It is not a scene of supernatural horror or apocalyptic fireworks. Instead, it is an immensely powerful evocation of realistic grief that is closer to Agee’s

    than anything from the master of pop horror. (For the record, I spent a day in a closet nursing a bottle of Fireball after I finished

    ).

    More than most authors, Stephen King has always worked at both the textual and subtextual level. He places a premium on his stories, to be sure, but always gives over space to meditate on his themes. At his worst (the simplistic, condescending parable of

    ), King wields his motifs with all the subtlety of Jack Nicholson putting an axe into Scatman Crothers. At his best (the portrait of an abusive, alcoholic father in

    ), however, King’s subtext enriches and deepens what might otherwise be a forgettable spook-story.

    is, in some respects, vintage horror. But it worked for me – unpleasantly – on its second level. This is King’s meditation on the enormity of loss and the devastation of grief. All his books are filled with death, but this is the rare book – not just in the King canon, but in general – that deals squarely with dying. It realizes the uncomfortable truth that our own deaths, while frightening, do not come close to the unspeakable prospect of losing the people we love. This reality – and it is very real – is so powerful that it has to be diluted lest the message become unpalatable. That is King’s genius. He is able to riff on ideas of life, death, and the afterlife in the guise of a horror story. His story is almost good enough to keep you from crawling into a corner and curling into the fetal position.

    Almost.

    It seems like a lot of people first read Stephen King in their late-teens. Maybe a King novel was the first big “adult” book they ever read. I talked this book over with my Two-Person Russian Book Club partner Jamie, who read it in high school. Her memories of

    were images from her mind’s eye: the spookiness of the Micmac burial ground; the grim story that Rachel tells about her sister Zelda; the bloody and macabre endgame. Her experience of the book was therefore totally different than mine.

    With an exception or two, all the King novels I’ve read I read in my 30s. Thus, the BOO! moments don’t make a terribly profound impression on me. It’s the other stuff that gets under my skin.

    ’s evocation of death

    is heavy. Horror is generally seen as cathartic, a way to healthily channel our fears. For me, there was no catharsis. It gave me nightmares – not of monsters or ghosts, but of busy roads and the hidden clock that starts ticking away the moment we’re born.

    This is all a way of saying that I was psychologically damaged by this book for entirely unexpected reasons.

    might be King’s best novel. As I noted above, it is devastatingly effective on a couple levels. But it is also really well written. King is a natural storyteller. Everything he writes seems to have its own propulsion system. This is sometimes marred by his propensity towards cultural spew. King is a pop cultural maven, and he tends to strew the ephemera of that culture throughout his stories. His novels are oft populated by characters who think and speak in various sound bites: snatches of musical lyrics; jingles from commercials; one-liners from films.

    For whatever reason (probably a forceful editor), that distracting aspect of King’s writing is kept to a minimum here. This is a story that is honed like a blade, and shorn of gristle. I’m not going to pretend I don’t like the gratuitous digressions of King’s big opuses. But the pared down storytelling in

    adds to its overall impact.

    Confronting fear can be incredibly cleansing. That didn't happen for me here. Yet the miserable mood

    foisted upon me is testament to its qualities. It is a transcendent masterpiece of the horror genre.

  • Melissa ♥ Dog Lover ♥ Martin

    While reading this book, all I that runs through my head is the song the Ramones made for the movie.

    So, I'm going to link the video so all of you can have it running through your head as well! Kickin' it old school =)

    Okay, let me just go ahead and say there will be

    for those that haven't read the book or seen the movie.

    I have seen the movie about 6 million 5 hundred and 8 times. And I love it! THIS is the first time I have read the book, and as there are

    While reading this book, all I that runs through my head is the song the Ramones made for the movie.

    So, I'm going to link the video so all of you can have it running through your head as well! Kickin' it old school =)

    Okay, let me just go ahead and say there will be

    for those that haven't read the book or seen the movie.

    I have seen the movie about 6 million 5 hundred and 8 times. And I love it! THIS is the first time I have read the book, and as there are a few differences in the book and movie, they both rock monkey butt! The book didn't scare me at all for some reason. I think because of the said 6 million 5 hundred and 8 times that I have seen it that maybe it acclimated me to the book. Although, the movie is still creepy as hell.

    I totally freaked at the introduction to the book. Mr. King tells about moving to said place, teaching at the school, they had a cat named Smucky, their son was running to the road chasing the kite string like in the movie, but uh, didn't get killed! And some other things. It was like a whole new little world right there for me that he actually wrote this based on some home stuff!

    Remember in the book where Jud (the wonderful neighbor) takes them out to the Pet Sematary?

    Okay, so there was a real (I wonder if it's still there?) Pet Sematary and their cat Smucky is buried there and that is what Mr. King's daughter wrote! I mean, I can't even. I want to go visit there now and see if the place is still there!

    So wonderful Jud from across the road has a great friendship with Louis and the kids, a little iffy with Rachel.

    Anyway, Jud is the one that has Louis bury Church (the cat) when he gets hit on that damn road all of those crazy trucks would fly down. But little did Louis know that Church was going to come back, even when the poor boy from the school (Pascow) who got hit by a car and killed, came back as a ghost to warn Louis. Why don't people just listen?

    So now Church is back home and he isn't the same any more. But the family didn't find out anything happened to him while they were out of town. They just think he's weird and stinks when they get home. Uh, yeah!

    So then, it all goes to hell in a hand basket.

    Gage is killed on the road. . . . . .

    and in the movie you get to see who presides over the funeral.

    Yup, the King =)

    and then. . . don't do it . . . don't to it.

    He does it, Louis takes Gage to the Pet Sematary and yeah. . . Gage isn't the same when he comes back! He kills Jud! Damn it all! and Ellie had been having bad dreams about her daddy so Rachel comes home and goes to Jud's house and she gets killed because Gage isn't Gage any more.

    And Louis finally takes out Church and Gage, but does he learn from his lesson? Nooooooooooooooo, he takes and buries Rachel in the Sematary. Well, you can use your imagination for the rest of that one. . .

    This was an awesome book to read for Halloween time or any time really but it's extra special at Halloween! ♥

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