Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience and Finding Joy by Sheryl Sandberg

Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience and Finding Joy

From Facebook's COO and Wharton’s top-rated professor, the #1 New York Times best-selling authors of Lean In and Originals: a powerful, inspiring, and practical book about building resilience and moving forward after life’s inevitable setbacks.After the sudden death of her husband, Sheryl Sandberg felt certain that she and her children would never feel pure joy again. “I w...

Title:Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience and Finding Joy
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:0753548283
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:240 pages

Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience and Finding Joy Reviews

  • MISA Thakur
    Mar 31, 2017

    The best book I have come across on grieving and healing

  • Abel Keogh
    Apr 19, 2017

    I’m honored to be a small part of Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant’s new book Option B. (See page 164.) The message of the book is one that everyone can benefit and learn from: We are stronger and more resilient than we think. We not only have the ability to cope with devastating life events but can rediscover joy and find greater and deeper meaning and appreciation for life. It helps readers learn how to own situations instead of having situations own us.

    Since many of my readers are widowers or a

    I’m honored to be a small part of Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant’s new book Option B. (See page 164.) The message of the book is one that everyone can benefit and learn from: We are stronger and more resilient than we think. We not only have the ability to cope with devastating life events but can rediscover joy and find greater and deeper meaning and appreciation for life. It helps readers learn how to own situations instead of having situations own us.

    Since many of my readers are widowers or are in a relationship with a widower, the book is about how Sheryl Sandberg was able to put her life back together after the unexpected death of her husband. The book has some good ideas that can help widowers overcome the loss of their spouse and count the blessings in their lives. It contains tips on how to talk to those who have lost a loved one or struggling with serious life events.

    Thankfully the book looks beyond simply losing a spouse and you don’t have to have lost a spouse to appreciate the message Sandberg and Grant convey. Anyone who’s suffered from or had a friend or family member who’s has a serious disease, lost a job, is going through a divorce, struggling with addictions, victim of sexual assault, etc. can benefit from the message in this book. Highly recommend it.

  • Azhar
    Apr 26, 2017

    This one is a tear jerker - ugly criers be warned. Beyond the Instagram selfies and humble brag Facebook posts is a ton of grief in all of our lives that we do our best to hide from others. Option B uses Sheryl's tragedy to openly discuss trauma, it's impact, recovery, and post trauma growth in a tone free of pretension. I especially appreciated parts of the book that recommended actions to take to support a friend experiencing a loss of some kind. There's a lot of realness in this book. I'm gla

    This one is a tear jerker - ugly criers be warned. Beyond the Instagram selfies and humble brag Facebook posts is a ton of grief in all of our lives that we do our best to hide from others. Option B uses Sheryl's tragedy to openly discuss trauma, it's impact, recovery, and post trauma growth in a tone free of pretension. I especially appreciated parts of the book that recommended actions to take to support a friend experiencing a loss of some kind. There's a lot of realness in this book. I'm glad I read it and I hope all of my friends do too.

  • Jay
    Apr 25, 2017

    As a female who has worked in tech, specifically in social media, I must say, I lack investment in corporate life. I'm the one who wants to be the full-time wife...

    And it is with that in mind that I must tell you, Sheryl Sandberg blew me away. While I could appreciate her earlier book, 'Lean In,' Option B was one of the most raw, gut wrenching reads I've had in some time. If there's anything she left out, I can't begin to fathom what that may be.

    As a female who has worked in tech, specifically in social media, I must say, I lack investment in corporate life. I'm the one who wants to be the full-time wife...

    And it is with that in mind that I must tell you, Sheryl Sandberg blew me away. While I could appreciate her earlier book, 'Lean In,' Option B was one of the most raw, gut wrenching reads I've had in some time. If there's anything she left out, I can't begin to fathom what that may be.

    In clear, haunting detail, Sheryl describes how she & the couple's friends found Dave & I lost it... Yes, I lost it all of a few pages in. I've been through & continue to face some deep losses & rather than irritating platitudes, Sheryl Sandberg speaks in a way that is relatable.

    No matter the means a family may acquire, nothing can shield us from the death of a loved one. In some ways, it's perhaps the cruelest joke of all... the one time you really want your money to buy your way out of something, you're powerless. Although it's never said quite like that, I've been there. As Sheryl recounts the calls to numerous friends & experts, the common theme is that as well meaning as they may be, even as much as they may help to an extent, no network, no amount of money, no amount of status gets us out of this one.

    There are very few people Of whom I can say I'd like to meet, but Sheryl Sandberg is on that list. Her compassion and genuine kindness are a rare find.

  • Rebecca Eisenberg
    May 11, 2017

    Sheryl Sandberg lost her husband, and that is very sad, and is a tragedy that no one deserves. Also, SS learned how to gain resilience and re-find joy, which is fantastic, and I know we all wish for her. That said, the advice she offers in this book does not seem relevant or helpful to almost anyone but Sheryl Sandberg (with the possible exception of other billionaire celebrities with limitless job security and financial resources). For example, in this book, SS recommends the following:

    1. It's

    Sheryl Sandberg lost her husband, and that is very sad, and is a tragedy that no one deserves. Also, SS learned how to gain resilience and re-find joy, which is fantastic, and I know we all wish for her. That said, the advice she offers in this book does not seem relevant or helpful to almost anyone but Sheryl Sandberg (with the possible exception of other billionaire celebrities with limitless job security and financial resources). For example, in this book, SS recommends the following:

    1. It's ok to cry at work. [For everyone but SS, it is NOT ok to cry at work.]

    2. It's ok to cry when hosting a dinner party for your employer's "most important" customers. [NO, it is not ok.]

    3. Falling asleep at a meeting is a sign of progress, meaning that you no longer are crying and/or thinking only about your personal tragedy. [No.]

    4. Because most companies fail due to problems that were known but not addressed, it is a good idea to tell your boss what he/she is doing wrong. [A. It is not clear what this has to do with the subject of the book, and B. No, unless you want to be fired.]

    5. If you have lost your lease or mortgage due to the death of a spouse, and now you are homeless, confidence and a positive attitude will get you through. [No specific details offered how that works exactly.]

    6. After tragedy, try to get back to your regular routine, e.g. traveling internationally with your extended family and friends, and meeting with famous people in India and China [that probably won't be helpful to most people].

    7. Most of all, make sure that everyone in your life -- your parents, siblings, in-laws, friends, co-workers, and bosses -- are supportive and perfect, and definitely not crazy [How? How?].

    With a somber tone, SS describes how the majority of widows face significant financial challenges from the death of their husbands. Many lose their leases or mortgages; many enter poverty. SS has no suggestions for those millions of women. Rather, she notes, she is blessed that she does not have those problems.

    Similarly, SS recommends finding a new love interest in order to find joy. This advice, also, fails to address the financial context of many marriages -- the way that financial dependence on a deceased husband often leads to financial dependence in remarriage.

    Truly, my heart does go out to SS for the loss of her husband. This kind of loss is monumental and life-altering. I do not deny the reality of her pain and suffering.

    That said, I think that this book has a very narrow target audience. I am not poor by any means, yet her experience lacks any similarity with those of my best friends who lost their husbands over the past 3 years (unfortunately, 3 of them). In the case of the widows in my life -- which meshes with statistics nationally and internationally -- all of the women were forced to grieve without having the luxury of taking any kind of break from work or family responsibilities. In fact, all 3 had to move to different homes, had to turn to friends and family to pay down significant debt, and had to sell belongings and take on additional work hours to resolve financial crisis. Even though all of their husbands died a longer time ago then SS's did, none have had time to date, and none otherwise have found joy.

    Sadly, the cold hard truth is that for the vast number of people who experience the loss of a spouse, resilience alone does not provide relief. Perhaps the moral of this book is that money buys happiness -- or, at least, being a billionaire does. Although there must be other routes to joy, I don't think you will find the answers in this book.

  • Jess Johnson
    May 27, 2017

    This was interesting to read after 'Lean In.' In some ways, Sheryl is absolutely humbled by the tragedy that hit her family. She openly talks through the vulnerability and admits to a lot of the assumptions she made with 'Lean In' coming from a place of stability and privilege. I enjoy how she dips into the research on real techniques that help in very concrete ways.

    That said, Sandberg still approaches things from privilege. In her worst moment, it took a village to raise her up (her family rall

    This was interesting to read after 'Lean In.' In some ways, Sheryl is absolutely humbled by the tragedy that hit her family. She openly talks through the vulnerability and admits to a lot of the assumptions she made with 'Lean In' coming from a place of stability and privilege. I enjoy how she dips into the research on real techniques that help in very concrete ways.

    That said, Sandberg still approaches things from privilege. In her worst moment, it took a village to raise her up (her family rallies around her and drops everything to prioritize spending time with her, she's gone through tragedy so she goes and calls a brilliant psychologist friend for free advice, she can afford help on other things, etc.). I think anyone can take away some gems of wisdom in how to approach tragedy but people need to be realistic about how much they can copy and paste her path forward -- most people do not have the resources and support network Sandberg does. I wish this had been addressed a bit more as Sandberg gives some statistics on people who can't take time off for ill or dying loved ones but she never touches on the difficulty of how others make it through.

  • Jennifer Blankfein
    May 31, 2017

    Sheryl Sandberg suffered a tragic and unthinkable loss when her husband died on vacation, and just like anyone else, she had to develop coping strategies and solutions to problems in order to work through her grief, comfort her children and get back to living. Her personal story is honest, devastating and inspiring as she, along with her friend and co-writer, Adam Grant, present a lot of great information and ideas for those who have experienced a loss, also providing advice and suggestions for

    Sheryl Sandberg suffered a tragic and unthinkable loss when her husband died on vacation, and just like anyone else, she had to develop coping strategies and solutions to problems in order to work through her grief, comfort her children and get back to living. Her personal story is honest, devastating and inspiring as she, along with her friend and co-writer, Adam Grant, present a lot of great information and ideas for those who have experienced a loss, also providing advice and suggestions for friends, family and coworkers on how to be supportive and understanding in Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy.

    The book has expertly woven Sandberg’s personal stories with a more technical approach to grief. Based on research, Sandberg and Grant suggest recovery from a tragedy can be stunted if you tend to think what happened is your fault, if you believe the bad thing that happened will affect all areas of your life and if you think the feelings of unhappiness will never end. Once you realize none of these are true, you are better able to cope and are on the road to recovery.

    They talk about the benefits of journaling to work through feelings and how to focus on the positives. Sandberg says “Journaling helped me make sense of the past and rebuild my self confidence to navigate the present and future.” “Adam suggested I write 3 things I have done well today”. They suggest that “contributions are active” and they “remind us that we can make a difference”. Also the suggestion of writing down 3 moments of joy experienced each day helps to remember there are still good things happening.

    Another area of helpful advice revolves around building resilience in children and helping them develop 4 core beliefs: “1) they have some control over their lives, 2) they can learn from failure, 3) they matter as human beings, and 4) they have real strengths to rely on and share.” Sheryl shares conversations with her children and although each person and situation is unique, it gives the reader ideas of how to help children process a death and cope with a painful situation.

    In the wake of tragedy and loss we also learn about some possible positive repercussions. At this crucial time there is opportunity to change your thought process and dig deep. Post traumatic growth includes “finding personal strength, gaining appreciation, forming deeper relationships, discovering more meaning in life and seeing new possibilities.”

    In Option B there are lots of great examples based on experts and research of how to face adversity head on and come out ok on the other side. In addition, Sandberg talks about her experiences, how she made decisions about the children without her beloved partner, how humor is necessary and plays an important role in resilience and what is helpful to receive in terms of support and kind words from friends, coworkers and others.

    This inspirational book is Sheryl Sandberg’s personal story along with fantastic suggestions for things to do and ways to think about life when faced with adversity. It is a book everyone should read…a great gift as well.

    To follow all my reviews go to

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  • Brenda
    Jun 16, 2017

    Ok I didn't quite get through this one before it disappeared from my IPad but I did get through most of it.

    I found the book to be helpful with good insight not only for someone grieving a loss but also for anyone who is suffering from or have a loved one suffering from a serious illness, or experience some trauma. I also think it would be helpful to anyone who wants to understand how someone who is grieving feels and how you could help them with their grief.

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