The New Ocean: The Fate of Life in a Changing Sea by Bryn Barnard

The New Ocean: The Fate of Life in a Changing Sea

A fascinating look at the future of our oceans and how human actions may change them. The Earth our home is covered mostly with water: the wide, deep, salty, and very blue ocean. It regulates our climate in a way that makes life as we know it possible. This huge ocean is full of an amazing amount of life, most of which is too small to see. But life in the ocean is in trou...

Title:The New Ocean: The Fate of Life in a Changing Sea
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:0375870490
Edition Language:English
Number of Pages:40 pages

The New Ocean: The Fate of Life in a Changing Sea Reviews

  • Read  Ribbet

    Barnard looks at critical environmental concerns using six forms of ocean life. He takes on issues like the impact of climate change and plastic pollution to heighten the concerns about jellyfish, orcas, sea turtles, tuna, coral and blue-green algae. Sources for additional exploration are identified. A glossary is provided to support the learning of more scientific terms. The book could be jigsaw easily as teams or individuals look at each of the six forms a of sea life. The book is text heavy w

    Barnard looks at critical environmental concerns using six forms of ocean life. He takes on issues like the impact of climate change and plastic pollution to heighten the concerns about jellyfish, orcas, sea turtles, tuna, coral and blue-green algae. Sources for additional exploration are identified. A glossary is provided to support the learning of more scientific terms. The book could be jigsaw easily as teams or individuals look at each of the six forms a of sea life. The book is text heavy with some illustrative support but less other nonfiction features. It seems like a good book to include in a classroom collection that focuses on this content.

  • Barbara

    Striking oil on canvas illustrations complement informative text that is shocking and eye-opening in many ways. While many experts talk about global warming and the effects it is likely to have on coastlines and coastal cities, few have actually imagined the changes that may occur in the oceans and how that change--warmer temperatures, more pollution, and empty of life in some areas--may affect six marine species. By looking ahead at the fate of jellyfish, orcas, sea turtles, tuna, corals, and b

    Striking oil on canvas illustrations complement informative text that is shocking and eye-opening in many ways. While many experts talk about global warming and the effects it is likely to have on coastlines and coastal cities, few have actually imagined the changes that may occur in the oceans and how that change--warmer temperatures, more pollution, and empty of life in some areas--may affect six marine species. By looking ahead at the fate of jellyfish, orcas, sea turtles, tuna, corals, and blue-green algae, the author imagines what life in the future might be like. Apparently, species such as the jellyfish and blue-green algae will be the ones that survive and even thrive as the ocean as we know it changes. In the concluding section of this important book, the author discusses how these changes in the ocean may affect humans and other living things and makes a plea for readers to become interested in science, which offers our best chance at stopping some of these changes. Being informed is the best way to identify and then tackle the problem. I loved how he provided the example of sixteen-year-old Boyan Slat who devised a clean to collect garbage in the ocean. The end papers are also worth examining too since one set features all the garbage patches swirling through our planet's waters and the other shows how coral reefs are being damaged by too much acidification, which will clearly have an impact on anything living in the ocean waters. While some may find the book to be text heavy, I found the writing and descriptions gripping and heartbreaking in some respects. This book should serve as a wake-up call for those who deny that global matters exists or that it matters or will have any impact on us. Clearly, it might not affect some of us who are living today, but those who are being born right now will have to contend with these challenges, a sobering thought indeed. This would be an excellent addition to a classroom science library.

  • Katie

    At first glance this looks like a super cool picture book about ocean life. But it is defiantly one words then pictures. It's super educational. It does talk about some ocean life (like jellyfish, orcas, turtles, tuna, coral, blue- green algae). But it goes much more deep than I thought it would! After each life form, it talks about how it's evolved and changed (due to humans). This is a very deep and thought provoking book.

    Too many words for probably 2nd and below grades. Maybe 3rd too...

    Defin

    At first glance this looks like a super cool picture book about ocean life. But it is defiantly one words then pictures. It's super educational. It does talk about some ocean life (like jellyfish, orcas, turtles, tuna, coral, blue- green algae). But it goes much more deep than I thought it would! After each life form, it talks about how it's evolved and changed (due to humans). This is a very deep and thought provoking book.

    Too many words for probably 2nd and below grades. Maybe 3rd too...

    Definitely a good resource for an ocean project?!

  • Mandy

    Willow and I read this book together and took the time to really discuss the reasons why our oceans are in trouble. We both loved this book - Willow loved it because she has a deep love for ocean creatures (and the illustrations were beautiful), and I loved it because it shed light on real issues at hand and why it is so important to be aware and have compassion. Incredibly educational and insightful - it's a book I recommend for everyone. While I already knew the dangers of global warming, poll

    Willow and I read this book together and took the time to really discuss the reasons why our oceans are in trouble. We both loved this book - Willow loved it because she has a deep love for ocean creatures (and the illustrations were beautiful), and I loved it because it shed light on real issues at hand and why it is so important to be aware and have compassion. Incredibly educational and insightful - it's a book I recommend for everyone. While I already knew the dangers of global warming, pollution and overfishing, I learned just how much those three things can impact ocean life and oceans in general. We borrowed this book from our library, but I think it's one we'll end up purchasing.

  • Erin

    For such a short and simple book, it packs a pretty big horrifying punch. Through the stories of six ocean creatures, Bryn Barnard tells the larger tale of the changing ocean and in so doing makes it abundantly clear that the entire planet lies in the balance. Of course, it's not all doom and gloom. The jellyfish and blue algae will win out. Too bad for the rest of us, though. The final, most chilling thought that the reader is left with is that it may already be too late. Hundreds or thousands

    For such a short and simple book, it packs a pretty big horrifying punch. Through the stories of six ocean creatures, Bryn Barnard tells the larger tale of the changing ocean and in so doing makes it abundantly clear that the entire planet lies in the balance. Of course, it's not all doom and gloom. The jellyfish and blue algae will win out. Too bad for the rest of us, though. The final, most chilling thought that the reader is left with is that it may already be too late. Hundreds or thousands of years too late. Yikes.

    Beautiful and chilling. Awful and amazing.

  • Monique

    Interesting book for children focusing on the effect that pollution, garbage and other harmful conditions are having on the oceans and her creatures. The author spends a few pages each on jellyfish, orcas, turtles, tuna, corals, and blue-green algae, and the troubles they face from the increasing man-made issue.

  • Mrs.Melaugh Melaugh

    Using six species as examples, this slim volume sounds the alarm about changes in the ocean and makes an urgent call for action. There are several pages about each of these species: the rise of jellyfish, the endangering of orcas, the declining numbers of turtles, the decline of tuna and the high levels of mercury in the ones that are left, the warming and acidification of the ocean and consequent bleaching of coral reefs, and the rise in levels of blue-green algae. The graphics are lovely even

    Using six species as examples, this slim volume sounds the alarm about changes in the ocean and makes an urgent call for action. There are several pages about each of these species: the rise of jellyfish, the endangering of orcas, the declining numbers of turtles, the decline of tuna and the high levels of mercury in the ones that are left, the warming and acidification of the ocean and consequent bleaching of coral reefs, and the rise in levels of blue-green algae. The graphics are lovely even as they display disturbing events. The most dramatic painting shows a turtle whose warped shell has grown around a plastic six-pack ring in which it is stuck. Two maps on the end pages show the location of huge garbage patches (there is one in every major ocean now!) and the current state of coral bleaching with projections to 2095. Bleak passages like this one verge on hopelessness, “It may be that the human extinction event may actually have begun ten thousand years ago, when people invented agriculture, began clearing forests and jungles for fields, and thus began loading extra carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.” Thankfully, the author finishes on a positive note by citing the example of Boyan Slat, a sixteen-year-old Dutch engineering student who invented a passive ocean cleaner that has begun removing plastic garbage from the ocean. Young people are encouraged to study nature and science and work toward solutions.

  • Cara

    Although this text includes a wealth of valuable information, its inability to appeal to its intended audience may ensure that it does not get the attention it deserves. The picture book size and format will cause many students in grades 4-6 to shy away from considering the book as a serious resource. Unlike many current nonfiction texts, this book features paragraph after paragraph of unbroken text, with no additional text boxes to divide the information so that it is more easily digested. The

    Although this text includes a wealth of valuable information, its inability to appeal to its intended audience may ensure that it does not get the attention it deserves. The picture book size and format will cause many students in grades 4-6 to shy away from considering the book as a serious resource. Unlike many current nonfiction texts, this book features paragraph after paragraph of unbroken text, with no additional text boxes to divide the information so that it is more easily digested. The oil on canvas illustrations are detailed and realistic, but any nonfiction text can benefit from photographs that show reality to the reader.

    The book’s structure provides an introduction, sections on the six featured animals, a conclusion, bibliography, and glossary. Each species’ section is four pages long. The first spread provides an introduction to the animal, often accompanied by bulleted facts, plus an illustration. The second spread explores how humans’ actions are impacting the species, speculating whether they are likely to survive or not, plus another illustration. The endpapers each offer a map of the world showing the impact of human actions on the ocean, specifically looking at pollution and acidification. Though the conclusion offers some very doom-and-gloom possibilities, it ends on the hopeful note that readers who study and employ science can have a positive effect on the environment. Teachers in grades 4-6 can share this book with their science classes as a case study or encourage students to use its information for research projects.

Top Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. We uses Search API to find the overview of books over the internet, but we don't host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners, please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them. Read our DMCA Policies and Disclaimer for more details.