Rebel Rising by Beth Revis

Rebel Rising

When Jyn Erso was five years old, her mother was murdered and her father taken from her to serve the Empire. But despite the loss of her parents she is not completely alone—Saw Gerrera, a man willing to go to any extremes necessary in order to resist Imperial tyranny, takes her in as his own, and gives her not only a home but all the abilities and resources she needs to be...

Title:Rebel Rising
Author:
Rating:
Edition Language:English
Format Type:ebook
Number of Pages:304 pages

Rebel Rising Reviews

  • FanboyBen
    Jun 22, 2017

    Man, it feels like I’ve been on a string of ‘eh’ Star Wars books for a while now. “Thrawn”, “Catalyst,” “Ahsoka” (which, try as I might, I couldn’t even bring myself to finish)…all of the last few Star Wars stories I’ve tried have fallen at or below the 3-star rating for me. I was hoping that Rebel Rising would turn things around and deliver a Star Wars reading experience that was distinct and memorable. Alas, it was not to be.

    I actually really dug the first half of this, which picks up right f

    Man, it feels like I’ve been on a string of ‘eh’ Star Wars books for a while now. “Thrawn”, “Catalyst,” “Ahsoka” (which, try as I might, I couldn’t even bring myself to finish)…all of the last few Star Wars stories I’ve tried have fallen at or below the 3-star rating for me. I was hoping that Rebel Rising would turn things around and deliver a Star Wars reading experience that was distinct and memorable. Alas, it was not to be.

    I actually really dug the first half of this, which picks up right from the opening scene of “Rogue One” and follows a young Jyn Erso travailing the galaxy with Saw Gerrera. The tone that Beth Revis’ struck was pretty grim, and I was impressed by how bleak the proceedings were-for what’s perceivably a YA book, the first 200ish pages of “Rebel Rising” feels pretty raw and decidedly un-Star-Wars-y.

    But then, sadly, the halfway point hits, and any good feelings that I’d built up towards the book quickly dissipated. I won’t spoil where Revis chooses the story, but suffice to say, the aforementioned YA elements rear their ugly head, and what started out as one of the more unique entries in the new canon quickly becomes something we’ve seen a great many times before. Let me be clear: I’m actually okay with YA elements and teeny stuff-Claudia Gray’s Lost Stars ranks as one of my favorite books in the new canon-but the disconnect between the more conventional material and the book’s earlier, harsher approach was beyond jarring. By the time the book reached the final stretch and (rather chunkily) began to ease into the opening moments of “Rogue One,” I realized the book had lost me.

    There’s good stuff to be found in Rebel Rising, for those willing to search for it, and for those interested in seeing exactly what happened to Jyn Erso to transform her into the awesome warrior we met in Rogue One, I suppose it’s worth a read. It’s just a bummer that the whole wasn’t stronger than the individual parts.

  • Khurram
    May 28, 2017

    I did like this book, and I think Beth Revis did a great job describing Jyn Erso's emotional and tragic state. I don't think it would to be spoiler for anyone to know this is a tragic story. The only downside of the story for me was it was a bit too slow.

    The book takes place in two time periods. The first is a few months before Jyn is taken to meet the Rebellion, the other is from the point where 8 year old Jyn has just seen her mother killed and is in the hiding cave.

    We do learn more about Saw

    I did like this book, and I think Beth Revis did a great job describing Jyn Erso's emotional and tragic state. I don't think it would to be spoiler for anyone to know this is a tragic story. The only downside of the story for me was it was a bit too slow.

    The book takes place in two time periods. The first is a few months before Jyn is taken to meet the Rebellion, the other is from the point where 8 year old Jyn has just seen her mother killed and is in the hiding cave.

    We do learn more about Saw as well. We learn that a younger Saw was in the Clone Wars Season 5. Something that I think was done very well is the difference between the Rebellion and a terrorist. In Rogue One we learned the Rebels dismissed Saw for being "too extreme", in the book I saw the lengths he was willing to go to. We also see the events that built and broke Jyn down to the point where she was more of a skeptic then a rebel at the beginning of Rogue One.

    This a great filler in between Catalyst and Rogue One. The emotion and character development is great, but I do wish there was more action in the book as a change of pace.

  • Lata
    May 26, 2017

    3.5-4 stars. When Jyn is sitting in prison at the beginning of Rogue One, and throughout the story, she's not very emotive. There are hints in Rogue One of her tough years before, and this story fills in the details, from her time hiding from stormtroopers after her mother's death, to Cassian breaking her out of prison.

    Unlike Rogue One, this story acknowledges that Jyn had a mother who was far more canny than Galen, and who had a positive influence on her daughter. This story also fills in detai

    3.5-4 stars. When Jyn is sitting in prison at the beginning of Rogue One, and throughout the story, she's not very emotive. There are hints in Rogue One of her tough years before, and this story fills in the details, from her time hiding from stormtroopers after her mother's death, to Cassian breaking her out of prison.

    Unlike Rogue One, this story acknowledges that Jyn had a mother who was far more canny than Galen, and who had a positive influence on her daughter. This story also fills in details of how Saw Guerrera raised Jyn, teaching her to fight and be self reliant. Jyn also taught herself to be a very competent forger and slicer, skills that she used repeatedly from her early teens up to the time she ends up in prison.

    I thought the author did a good job at capturing Jyn's growing despair and depression as she used all her skills to fend for herself while encountering a variety of unsavoury individuals and situations. Jyn's darkness felt palpable. I thought Jyn's progression from scared eight-year old to hopeless prisoner in her 20s was credible.

  • Bria
    Apr 24, 2017

    A solidly enjoyable book that's unrelenting with its portrayal of how rough Jyn's life was after her mother died. Also Revis made me like Saw.

    Full review on Tosche Station:

  • Neil Hepworth
    May 02, 2017

    Star Wars meh.

    The beginning and end of the novel showed a lot of promise - dealing with both Jyn's early years with Saw, and with her subsequent capture by the Empire. Both were dark, gritty, and well plotted, even in their YA context. I just wish these moments in Jyn's life could have been explored by a non-YA novel. However, the middle of the book just reeks of the worst of YA tropes and character design. The love interest and his mother are very shallow, especially compared to how genuine the

    Star Wars meh.

    The beginning and end of the novel showed a lot of promise - dealing with both Jyn's early years with Saw, and with her subsequent capture by the Empire. Both were dark, gritty, and well plotted, even in their YA context. I just wish these moments in Jyn's life could have been explored by a non-YA novel. However, the middle of the book just reeks of the worst of YA tropes and character design. The love interest and his mother are very shallow, especially compared to how genuine the love story was in

    , another, better YA Star Wars novel.

    is not a bad book at all - it's just very forgettable.

    On a side note - why did Disney decide to create Jyn's story in the YA realm? I mean,

    worked as a YA novel because the character came from a cartoon targeted at the YA audience. But Jyn's character comes from the most mature Star Wars to date, so...IDK. Seems odd to me.

    Also, I'm ready for the Star Wars novels to move on to something other than "Here's a Story about a Character", i.e.

    , Ahsoka,

    ,

    ,

    , etc. Time to start thinking bigger. Maybe now that the

    trilogy is done, they will. Please.

  • KatieReaderRose
    Jun 03, 2017

    5 out of 5 stars.

    When Jyn Erso was five years old, her mother was murdered and her father taken from her to serve the Empire. But despite the loss of her parents she is not completely alone—Saw Gerrera, a man willing to go to any extremes necessary in order to resist Imperial tyranny, takes her in as his own, and gives her not only a home but all the abilities and resources she needs to become a rebel herself.

    I first saw Rogue One about a month ago and I loved it. I thought it was just a beautif

    5 out of 5 stars.

    When Jyn Erso was five years old, her mother was murdered and her father taken from her to serve the Empire. But despite the loss of her parents she is not completely alone—Saw Gerrera, a man willing to go to any extremes necessary in order to resist Imperial tyranny, takes her in as his own, and gives her not only a home but all the abilities and resources she needs to become a rebel herself.

    I first saw Rogue One about a month ago and I loved it. I thought it was just a beautiful story about regaining hope and finding family. All the characters brought me so much heartache because they seemed so tortured, but they really believed in the rebellion and held on so tightly to that hope of bringing a better future. I felt so connected to them and by the end I was in tears by how beautiful the movie was. That being said, there were still characters I wanted to know more about and I really wanted to know what happened during the time Jyn was with Saw. When I learned about this book I knew I had to have it and I was really surprised by how good it was and how well the author did on exploring that period of time with Saw and the characters.

    The book starts out with Jyn being put in prison, most likely the prison we see her in at the beginning of the movie and then jumps to the past when Saw found her hiding. From there on out we get to see their relationship and her training to get into the rebellion and how she got out of it.

    I love, love, loved Jyn and Saw's relationship throughout the whole book. It was one of those really great father-daughter relationships and I thought the author did a wonderful job showing their strengths and weaknesses in this area. They were both so damaged and Saw really just wanted to focus on the rebellion and taking down the Empire, but then there was this little girl he needed to take care of and no matter how hard he tried, he just couldn't take his emotions out of the situation. In Rogue One we kind of get a hint at this fatherly love Saw has for Jyn, but we don't go much farther than that and I was so pleased in this book to see that relationship grow and to see how they really relied on each other.

    Jyn was such a complicated character in Rogue One and she was so trouble and especially at the beginning we see how little hope she has, but we don't know all the reasons for this. In Rebel Rising not only did we get to see her thoughts when she was in that little hiding spot waiting for Saw, but we also see how she reacts to some really horrible things that are revealed to her and how they affect her emotionally. It broke my heart reading this book and seeing how this sweet little girl got so broken up and all the things that kept being thrown at her to take her innocence away. I was completely blown away by how the author delved into Jyn's past and added so much to her character. By the end I really felt like I knew Jyn in a whole different light and how much deeper she seems to me now.

    There were also new characters we didn't get to meet in the movie that I thought added so much to Jyn's story and to the whole Star Wars realm. It was really cool to see how she interacted with these characters and how they added to her story and what she learned from them.

    The author did an awesome job on sticking with the feeling of the Star Wars world. It was much darker than what we get to see in the movies, but it really fit, especially with how it leads into Rogue One, which is a much darker film than the other movies. I was pleased that she was able to stick to the tone and how she tied it into the movie. I would definitely suggest this book if you've seen the movie and want a deeper look into Jyn's past and want to know some of the characters a little better.

    I would rate this for 13-14+. Like I said, it is a little darker and pretty sad just because of where Jyn comes from and there are several times when she's just ready to give up and doesn't know what to do with the rest of her life. So, in that way it's really, really sad and a little depressing to see how lost and hopeless she is for some of the book. There are also some pretty intense action scenes and some of them get quite bloody. There is a scene where they talk about people being brutally killed and it gets pretty bloody and upsetting. And there is one suicide that I thought it was a little descriptive, but you kind of see it coming and it's pretty easy to skip over if that kind of thing upsets you.

    There is a bit of a romance in here and one scene where it's implied the characters had sex.

  • Stephen Richter
    Jun 19, 2017

    If you are one of those people that loved the film Rogue One and wished for more Jen, you are in luck.

    has filled in the backstory . Now if you want the whole experience of the Rogue One story you can do the following. First read

    which gives you the Galen backstory. Then start the film of Rogue One, stop as Jen sits in the hiding place. Read this book,

    as you follow the young Jen from Saw to prison. Then restart Rogue One followed quickly by Ne

    If you are one of those people that loved the film Rogue One and wished for more Jen, you are in luck.

    has filled in the backstory . Now if you want the whole experience of the Rogue One story you can do the following. First read

    which gives you the Galen backstory. Then start the film of Rogue One, stop as Jen sits in the hiding place. Read this book,

    as you follow the young Jen from Saw to prison. Then restart Rogue One followed quickly by New Hope. For those who still think Disney has destroyed Star Wars, this is proof you are crazy.

  • Justine
    Jul 14, 2017

    I listened to the audiobook version of this with my kids and it was a great pick for us. As expected, there wasn't much happiness in this story. That said, the sad progression of Jyn's childhood with Saw and her teen and early adulthood spent alone and ultimately ending in prison all make the redemption of hope she experiences in Rogue One that much sweeter.


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