The Book of Mormon: Another Testament of Jesus Christ by Anonymous

The Book of Mormon: Another Testament of Jesus Christ

The Book of Mormon is a volume of scripture comparable to the Bible. It is a record of God's dealings with the ancient inhabitants of the Americas and contains, as does the Bible, the fullness of the everlasting gospel.The book was written by many ancient prophets by the spirit of prophecy and revelation. Their words, written on gold plates, were quoted and abridged by a p...

Title:The Book of Mormon: Another Testament of Jesus Christ
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:0967686563
Edition Language:English
Number of Pages:531 pages

The Book of Mormon: Another Testament of Jesus Christ Reviews

  • Alicia Krauchuk Fenton

    Without sounding sacreligious, I am profoundly grateful for this book. It's a book about answers to personal challenges. It's a book about how to live your life. It's a book about two civilizations and their relationship with a loving Father in Heaven.

    There really isn't a rating you could give something so profound and precious. And to this, I apologize.

    It is the BEST book I have ever read. This is at the top of my favorite list!!! For anyone who hasn't read this yet, and would like a free copy

    Without sounding sacreligious, I am profoundly grateful for this book. It's a book about answers to personal challenges. It's a book about how to live your life. It's a book about two civilizations and their relationship with a loving Father in Heaven.

    There really isn't a rating you could give something so profound and precious. And to this, I apologize.

    It is the BEST book I have ever read. This is at the top of my favorite list!!! For anyone who hasn't read this yet, and would like a free copy, I'd be glad to send you one! :-) It's worth your time. Just be prepared to have your life changed...for the better!!!

  • Mont'ster

    This book is much more entertaining if you read it as a "historical novel" rather than trying to read it as a religious text. Honestly, because of the sheer volume of anachronistic errors contained in Joseph Smith's book, even trying to read it as a novel is taxing.

    The Book of Mormon is set in North America in the first century. Before I get "flamed" I would like to point out three of the more glaring anachronistic errors:

    1) Horses (actually brought to the Americas by Europeans hundreds of year

    This book is much more entertaining if you read it as a "historical novel" rather than trying to read it as a religious text. Honestly, because of the sheer volume of anachronistic errors contained in Joseph Smith's book, even trying to read it as a novel is taxing.

    The Book of Mormon is set in North America in the first century. Before I get "flamed" I would like to point out three of the more glaring anachronistic errors:

    1) Horses (actually brought to the Americas by Europeans hundreds of years later)

    2) Wheat (actually brought to the Americas by Europeans hundreds of years later)

    3) The book of Mormon claims the existence of

    first century

    (not "towns" or "villages" or "settlements" but "cities") in North America. No evidence has EVER been found to substantiate the existence of even ONE of these cities.

    There are also major battles recorded in the Book of Mormon and, again, NO evidence has EVER been found to substantiate even ONE of those battles. This book is probably most correctly classified as Science Fiction/Fantasy.

  • Lucy

    While certainly not comprehensive, here are some of my observations from reading this entire book in three days:

    * Nephi is hard for the proud to like. If this sounds sacrilege, and you've never had this thought before, congratulations...you're probably not proud. But, pride is something I struggle with so his, "Why can't you all just be more like me?" attitude can be a stumbling block. But the thing to remember is, he was called of God, and although his personality might make me less wont to in

    While certainly not comprehensive, here are some of my observations from reading this entire book in three days:

    * Nephi is hard for the proud to like. If this sounds sacrilege, and you've never had this thought before, congratulations...you're probably not proud. But, pride is something I struggle with so his, "Why can't you all just be more like me?" attitude can be a stumbling block. But the thing to remember is, he was called of God, and although his personality might make me less wont to invite him to a party, his righteousness is absolute. And, ultimately, those who are called to be our leaders are meant to be followed. This means that the relief society president, who drives me batty (not my current one), still has the mantle of leadership, and it is my responsibility to adjust my pride so that I can learn the gospel. Laman and Lemuel, while probably slightly justified in finding their younger brother too much to take, allowed their pride to turn to sin, which resulted in the loss of the spirit. And thus, the second promise of the Lord is fulfilled, that "inasmuch as ye will not keep my commandments ye shall be cut off from my presence. They didn't and they were.

    * the word "durst" is used quite frequently.

    * The lineage of authorship foreshadows the later-day church established by Joseph Smith. Nephi gives the small plates to his brother, Jacob, not to any of his own children. Sort of similar to how Hyrum's children were later leaders for the LDS church but not Joseph's own. I found that interesting. I wonder if there was an ancient RLDS church out there.

    * The allegory of the Lord in the Vineyard found in Jacob is profound and deeply relevant to our day.

    * There were some slackers that were handed the plates.

    * Race does not matter. The line between Nephite and Lamanite was so blurred throughout their history that it wasn't a matter of race. The distinction was between those who were lived the commandments of God and those who ignored them. The Nephites who turned "bad" were the worst of all. Those were some scary dudes.

    * I've often wondered why there are so many details of the wars. I'm sure there are multiple and deeper reasons, but I'm leaning towards Mormon just being really interested in it. After all, he was in charge of the entire Nephite army when he was only 16. I can imagine him looking through all the old plates and scrolls and loving all the details Captain Moroni, Teancum, Helaman and Moronihah left. It's a manly book. If only their wives could have been bloggers.

    * Sadly, the history is dictated by which war was in what year. I don't think their history differed from that of any other civilization. We mark time by our skirmishes and conquests. The peace and love that existed while Christ visited, and the effect his visit had for generations to come, stands in stark contrast.

    * The sacrament is sacred. Jay and I had a discussion a couple of weeks ago where he pointed out that taking the sacrament is symbolic of partaking of the tree of life. After reading Christ's words to his disciples, I absolutely agree. I think we endanger our spirits when we partake unworthily or even absentmindedly.

    * It truly matters who our leaders are. I found this discovery extremely apropos with the current change in leadership of this church, as well as the leadership of our country. It takes a wise, humble, and righteous person to effectively lead his people in peace and prosperity whereas a corrupt leader inevitably leads those who follow to destruction. Every time.

    * Being rich isn't the point of being prosperous. I think a great stewardship comes with becoming rich. It's almost a test to see how you handle it. I've been feeling covetous lately for a large home. You see these monster homes being built everywhere around here and it's gotten into my head that I must have one. Nothing less than 5,000 square feet will do! It's pretty clear throughout the book that those the Lord blesses with prosperity doesn't entitle them to get caught up with their money and belongings. The outcome is never good when this happens. So, I'm going to nip this feeling in the bud and hopefully do it before the riches come. (by the way, I don't think having a 5,000 square foot house is bad. But coveting one before you need it or can afford it certainly is).

    * Moroni was totally improvising at the end. He didn't know when he'd die so he just kept adding stuff at the end. And there is some really good stuff at the end!

    * The moral of the story seems to be repentance. The theme throughout is "keep my commandments and you will prosper in the land." but as no one does that perfectly, except my good friend Nephi (who, really I'm just envious of because he never seems to stumble...and who doesn't stumble???) the only way to do it is to repent...continually.

    The best part of this experience has been today. There is a certain famous verse, although when I read it, it wasn't a verse but merely part of the second to last page, where Moroni challenges the reader to pray with a sincere heart to discover the truth of the book. My greatest fear while reading was that I would feel exactly the same afterwards. I wanted to feel more, and an inner voice sounded off a worry about what I'd think if I didn't.

    I didn't know if I'd get the burning bosom. I wanted it, but knew I couldn't force it so I decided to fast the entire day and made arrangements with my sister to have her watch my children while I went to the temple. It was while I was driving to her high school to drop them off, and after I switched the CD playing from a mix to a Mormon Tabernacle Choir recording (I knew no burning would come from listening to Timbaland) that it came. Peace like a River started to play while I was going through the drive through at Carl's Jr. to get lunch for my boys and the melody and words "peace like a river", " faith like a river" "hope like a river", "love like a river" and I felt overwhelmed with such a spirit of joy and love for my Savior.

    That's it! That's it. There are wars, and rumors of wars, and corruption and sin and secret combinations and even total destruction. But with Christ, there is peace. And hope. And charity. The Book of Mormon boldly teaches us the commandments of God, and of His plan so that the faith, hope and peace can be felt.

    This book is true. It is not written by a genius of manipulation. By their fruits ye shall know them, and this is good fruit. It testifies of Christ and because it does, it uplifts the soul.

  • Amanda

    Elder Ballard of the LDS Church, talking to a group of graduates at BYU-Hawaii, encouraged us to use the media, specifically blogs, to teach of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I'd like all who read this post to know that this is a book that has changed my life. It is a book that can change anyone's life if read with an open heart and mind. It testifies of Jesus Christ, our atoning Savior. It was translated by Joseph Smith Jr., who was a prophet of God. I've read this book many t

    Elder Ballard of the LDS Church, talking to a group of graduates at BYU-Hawaii, encouraged us to use the media, specifically blogs, to teach of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I'd like all who read this post to know that this is a book that has changed my life. It is a book that can change anyone's life if read with an open heart and mind. It testifies of Jesus Christ, our atoning Savior. It was translated by Joseph Smith Jr., who was a prophet of God. I've read this book many times and I learn something new every time. I spent a year and a half in Brazil teaching from and about this book. I use this book to help raise my children in righteousness. "Abiding by it's principles will get you nearer to God than any other book." I know that this is true, for it has worked in my life. I'd encourage all who read this comment to also read this book.

  • Kevin Kelsey

    Unlike most religious texts that are approached metaphorically, the Book of Mormon claims to be an historical history of the Americas on its title page, which is a verifiable claim.

    The linguistic, anachronistic, biological, sociological, and archaeological evidence against this being a legitimate history of the Americas is monumentally staggering. Pick a random field of study, and that field has numerous evidences illustrating the impossibility of this being historically accurate. Even BYU's ow

    Unlike most religious texts that are approached metaphorically, the Book of Mormon claims to be an historical history of the Americas on its title page, which is a verifiable claim.

    The linguistic, anachronistic, biological, sociological, and archaeological evidence against this being a legitimate history of the Americas is monumentally staggering. Pick a random field of study, and that field has numerous evidences illustrating the impossibility of this being historically accurate. Even BYU's own archaeology department shut down their research into its historical accuracy in the seventies, because they didn't find anything after decades of field research.

    Setting all of that aside, the text is derivative to the point of containing translation/text errors and phrases unique to the contemporary books it borrowed chunks from (mainly: 1.

    2.

    and 3.

    , and of course the KJV version of the Old Testament/New Testament).

    I'd give it a C for effort by the standards of the 1800s, but if you're going to claim a found text as history, and you want it to last, you simply have to try harder than this. It just doesn't hold up to modern standards for determining authenticity.


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