The Wonder of Birds: What They Tell Us about Ourselves, the World, and a Better Future by Jim Robbins

The Wonder of Birds: What They Tell Us about Ourselves, the World, and a Better Future

A fascinating investigation into the miraculous world of birds and the powerful--and surprising--ways they enrich our lives and sustain the planetOur relationship to birds is different from our relationship to any other wild creatures. They are found virtually everywhere and we love to watch them, listen to them, keep them as pets, wear their feathers, even converse with t...

Title:The Wonder of Birds: What They Tell Us about Ourselves, the World, and a Better Future
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:0812993535
Number of Pages:256 pages

The Wonder of Birds: What They Tell Us about Ourselves, the World, and a Better Future Reviews

  • Carol

    The Wonder of Birds: What They Tell Us About Ourselves, The World and a Better Future by Jim Robbins will have you reading out loud to your spouses, friends and family. Having read a lot about bird psychology, habits, and about different kinds of birds, there is still so much to learn about them.

    The author divides his book into five different sections: What Birds Tell Us About the Natural World, The Gifts of Birds, Discovering Ourselves Through Birds and Birds and Hope for a Better Future. In t

    The Wonder of Birds: What They Tell Us About Ourselves, The World and a Better Future by Jim Robbins will have you reading out loud to your spouses, friends and family. Having read a lot about bird psychology, habits, and about different kinds of birds, there is still so much to learn about them.

    The author divides his book into five different sections: What Birds Tell Us About the Natural World, The Gifts of Birds, Discovering Ourselves Through Birds and Birds and Hope for a Better Future. In those sections are several chapters each. In each section, I have a few favorite chapters. For example in the first section, A Murmuring of Birds: The Extraordinary Design of the Flock. I was very excited to see this chapter because, I have a lot of memories of sitting on a concrete bench after work waiting for my husband to pick me up from work. On some days, I saw hundreds of black birds fly in front of the building and take sharp turns suddenly and never being off with a lone bird in the flock. Essentially it was a long ballet of birds that went on for at least an hour. Why they seeming turn in unison and never make a mistake? How did they all know their own part in the ballet? Unfortunately once I was really caught up in this intricate moving geometry of dance, someone who sit down beside me and interrupt my wonder with conversation! The authors goes into the research about all the variables of flock movement. The more you read, the more fascinating it becomes.

    That is just one of my reactions, I have many to this informative book about birds. There are so fascinating facts about different birds are covered. There were many times that I put this book down and connected with my past memories of birds or just stopped to muse about how amazing birds are.

    The reading is very comfortable. Even some things codes be very technical, he never let my interest wilt. My love of birds is just much stronger. I was disappointed that he hunts birds but I will forgive him that for this book. My only plea to him is to please hunt with the camera instead of a gun.

    I highly recommend this book to all bird lovers.

    I received this Advance Reading Copy of the above book from the publisher by a win from FirstReads. My thoughts and feelings in this review are totally my own.

  • Kelsie

    I love learning about nature/animals/birds, so I was super excited to win this book through Goodreads giveaways. I was a little disappointed though because much of the book discusses birds in relation to humans (how we benefit, learn, utilize, and depend on them). I was expecting less of an anthropocentric perspective and more of an overview of the amazing and unique qualities of birds.

    Also, while most of the book was well written, there are a few word choices/phrases that lessened the overall q

    I love learning about nature/animals/birds, so I was super excited to win this book through Goodreads giveaways. I was a little disappointed though because much of the book discusses birds in relation to humans (how we benefit, learn, utilize, and depend on them). I was expecting less of an anthropocentric perspective and more of an overview of the amazing and unique qualities of birds.

    Also, while most of the book was well written, there are a few word choices/phrases that lessened the overall quality of writing and status as an intellectual nonfiction book. It also saddened me to learn that the author was a bird hunter (he discussed his identity as a primal being when he hunts) and the extent of the content that talks about how birds are expendable commodities (ex. ostrich farming/meat industry/hunting, experiments/study, use as pest control, etc.)

    Overall, I learned a lot about several different types of birds as well as their contributions to humans throughout history and cultures.

  • Nostalgia Reader

    3.5 stars.

    Although I've always loved birds, I've become a much more avid and aware

    bird watcher in the past year, so this book caught my eye when it promised to reveal how important birds are to our lives.

    Each chapter focuses on a different species of bird/group of birds and discusses how the bird(s) unique features help out the environment and the human race, or highlights some of their amazing, still not understood feats of endurance. Geese that migrate high over Mt. Everest, bird mu

    3.5 stars.

    Although I've always loved birds, I've become a much more avid and aware

    bird watcher in the past year, so this book caught my eye when it promised to reveal how important birds are to our lives.

    Each chapter focuses on a different species of bird/group of birds and discusses how the bird(s) unique features help out the environment and the human race, or highlights some of their amazing, still not understood feats of endurance. Geese that migrate high over Mt. Everest, bird murmur studies, bird guano, bee-eater's human-like family dramas, and birds/birdwatching as therapy are just some of the multitudes of stories highlighted in Robbins' book. The writing style is incredibly easy to read, the perfect blend of hard facts, interviews, and personal observations. Perfect summer-time reading as you can easily dip in and out of the book, reading a chapter or two here and there as it catches your fancy.

    Many of these chapters piqued my interest, and made me more interested in many of the birds, or aspects of birds, that I read about. However, I still had to round down my rating of 3.5 stars because it falls into an information presentation style that I hate: The extremely amazed shock that birds are smart creatures who have personalities, can figure out problems, and are an extremely vital part of the ecosystem. More vital, and possibly even more smarter, than humans.

    There's no doubt that many of the facts I learned were quite surprising to me--I found myself thinking "a bird can really do that?!" throughout the book. But I felt like there was an undertone of offense under this all, as if birds being this awesome is offending a fragile human superego. This is a bit of a nit picking issue, as the overall tone takes a positive-neutral pro-bird stance. However, the astonishment seemed past the excited, "whoa, birds are amazing!" to the offended, "how in the world can birds be better than us?"

    I also found that, when Robbins discussed the importance and use of birds in indigenous cultures and beliefs, there seemed a disconnect to the importance or relevance of these stories, seeming to be included to meet a requirement rather than a true interest. Traditional stories that were used to complement the facts in some chapters seemed to be brushed aside as "silly" or insignificant--even though the epilogue encourages us to reconnect to nature and to that "oneness" with the earth that these ancient, indigenous cultures still retain.

    Despite my irritation with some of the stylistic undertones, I would still recommend this book to any bird or nature lover. It's an excellent way to introduce someone to how wonderful birds can be.

    Thank to NetGalley for providing me with a free copy to review!

    (Cross posted on

    .)

  • Lucy Banks

    Birds are fascinating creatures. Direct descendants of dinosaurs, they're capable of not only flight but a myriad of other impressive things - yet we often take them for granted.

    This book highlights, in wonderfully accessible language, just why birds are so remarkable. Each chapter is devoted to a different attribute - flight, eggs, intelligence an

    Birds are fascinating creatures. Direct descendants of dinosaurs, they're capable of not only flight but a myriad of other impressive things - yet we often take them for granted.

    This book highlights, in wonderfully accessible language, just why birds are so remarkable. Each chapter is devoted to a different attribute - flight, eggs, intelligence and so forth. Some chapters were particularly fascinating, such as the one on Corvids and their ability to create tools - amazing! The chapter on the USA's 'broiler belt' and the cruelty to chickens was likewise interesting and very hard-hitting.

    All the contents are backed up by scientific research and statistics, including some interviews with known experts in the field. However, at no point did I feel bamboozled by jargon - I loved that it was so easy to read.

    Only one tiny thing - I was bemused when the author said he liked to hunt birds. This seemed rather at odds with someone who professes to love them. But there you go, takes all sorts.

  • Montzalee Wittmann

    The Wonder of Birds: What They Tell Us about Ourselves, the World, and a Better Future by Jim Robbins is journey of love and fascination between mankind and birds. A journal where man has benefited by watching our feathered friends in different ways and how they have enriched our lives, how they have helped our planet, and have pleased our eyes and warmed our hearts. It is written so warmly, and tenderly, I can feel the love for the feathered creatures from far away and it warmed me...As a bird

    The Wonder of Birds: What They Tell Us about Ourselves, the World, and a Better Future by Jim Robbins is journey of love and fascination between mankind and birds. A journal where man has benefited by watching our feathered friends in different ways and how they have enriched our lives, how they have helped our planet, and have pleased our eyes and warmed our hearts. It is written so warmly, and tenderly, I can feel the love for the feathered creatures from far away and it warmed me...As a bird lover, nature lover, this is a treasure! For everyone, this book will delight and open their minds to our magical friends of a feather. The author takes us, hand and wing, on a journey through differences and changes that link us together. It is amazing how we are linked together in this amazing thing called life. Thank you NetGalley for letting me read this book.

  • Kirsten Cutler

    A fascinating exploration of birds, their incredible diversity and their many wonderful and unique characteristics including demonstrable intelligence. Truly inspiring to learn about the many people studying and interacting with birds, and poignant to read about people whose psyches have been healed through their connection with birds. This is a paean to birds that excites the reader to care about birds and perhaps even work to ensure their future thriving in an increasingly human-dominated worl

    A fascinating exploration of birds, their incredible diversity and their many wonderful and unique characteristics including demonstrable intelligence. Truly inspiring to learn about the many people studying and interacting with birds, and poignant to read about people whose psyches have been healed through their connection with birds. This is a paean to birds that excites the reader to care about birds and perhaps even work to ensure their future thriving in an increasingly human-dominated world. There was one little chapter that made me uncomfortable that described the author's pleasure in hunting pheasants, although my husband pointed out that often hunters are in the forefront of conservation of wild animals. Otherwise, I think this book is an important contribution to the literature about wildlife that is both accessible and informative.

  • Melinda M

    The Wonder of Birds: What They Tell Us about Ourselves, the World, and a Better Future by Jim Robbins shows the way that birds and humans benefit each other. Each Chapter covers different attributes of birds. He covers such things a the broiler belt in the US and does so with straight talk as well as a honest telling of what happens. I found it interesting but could have done with less preaching about things such as climate change and philosophy. It was not as much about different birds as the a

    The Wonder of Birds: What They Tell Us about Ourselves, the World, and a Better Future by Jim Robbins shows the way that birds and humans benefit each other. Each Chapter covers different attributes of birds. He covers such things a the broiler belt in the US and does so with straight talk as well as a honest telling of what happens. I found it interesting but could have done with less preaching about things such as climate change and philosophy. It was not as much about different birds as the action with humans and birds. The language was easy to follow.

    I received a copy thru a Goodreads Giveaway.

  • Jacquelin Siegel

    Absolutely fascinating. I kept having to set bookmarks so that I could read passages to my husband. I have a new appreciation for my feathered friends. Highly recommended.

Top Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. We uses Search API to find the overview of books over the internet, but we don't host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners, please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them. Read our DMCA Policies and Disclaimer for more details.