All Over the Place: Adventures in Travel, True Love, and Petty Theft by Geraldine DeRuiter

All Over the Place: Adventures in Travel, True Love, and Petty Theft

Some people are meant to travel the globe, to unwrap its secrets and share them with the world. And some people have no sense of direction, are terrified of pigeons, and get motion sickness from tying their shoes. These people are meant to stay home and eat nachos.Geraldine DeRuiter is the latter. But she won't let that stop her.Hilarious, irreverent, and heartfelt, All Ov...

Title:All Over the Place: Adventures in Travel, True Love, and Petty Theft
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:1610397630
Number of Pages:288 pages

All Over the Place: Adventures in Travel, True Love, and Petty Theft Reviews

  • Esil

    3.5 stars. All Over the Place is, well, a bit all over the place, but I still quite liked it. I recently read

    which was a memoir written by a young woman who quit her job and sold her house to go on a long journey around the world. My primary complaint about The Yellow Envelope was that it is too inward looking – I found out far too much about the author’s relationship with her husband and not enough about t

    3.5 stars. All Over the Place is, well, a bit all over the place, but I still quite liked it. I recently read

    which was a memoir written by a young woman who quit her job and sold her house to go on a long journey around the world. My primary complaint about The Yellow Envelope was that it is too inward looking – I found out far too much about the author’s relationship with her husband and not enough about the places she traveled. I could easily say the same about All Over the Place, but in this case it wouldn’t be a complaint. Geraldine De Ruiter is a travel blog writer. All Over the Place is a memoir in which she chronicles some of her travels, but the focus is really her family, her husband, some serious health issues and some inner struggles. What makes this book work for me is De Ruiter’s tone, sensibility and honesty. She is funny and self-deprecating, while delivering a healthy serving of random thoughtful observations about life, death and the universe. It’s light and not light – a book that can be read in a few disjointed sittings. Part of me kept wondering why she wrote this book and why it was picked up by a publisher – another voice told me to relax and enjoy the experience – which I did. It was definitely “all over the place”, but it took me to places I was happy to follow. Thank you to the publisher and to Netgalley for an opportunity to read an advance copy.

  • E.P.

    "All Over the Place" is a travel book, except that the travel is at least as much internal as it is external. Geraldine DeRuiter has transformed her popular blog, The Everywhereist, into a book that chronicles her trajectory from unemployment to travel blogger to brain-tumor-survivor to someone who's come to understand her family, her marriage, and herself. Well, at least a little bit better than she did before.

    As she freely admits at the beginning of the book, this isn't the kind of travel writ

    "All Over the Place" is a travel book, except that the travel is at least as much internal as it is external. Geraldine DeRuiter has transformed her popular blog, The Everywhereist, into a book that chronicles her trajectory from unemployment to travel blogger to brain-tumor-survivor to someone who's come to understand her family, her marriage, and herself. Well, at least a little bit better than she did before.

    As she freely admits at the beginning of the book, this isn't the kind of travel writing that explains to you how to save money in Sweden or avoid food poisoning in Fiji. Instead, it's the kind of travel writing where the trips serve as jumping-off points for musings on the meaning of life. If that sounds heavy, stuffy, or boring, it's not: DeRuiter's zany sense of humor comes bubbling out irrepressibly at every juncture, whether she's describing her mother's attempt to bring a pickax through airport security shortly after 9/11 (I may have cried a little during that scene, I laughed so hard), or the difficulties she and her husband face to preserve the happy state of their marriage under the pressure of her recovery from brain surgery and his inhumanly long work hours. There are also stories of her semi-successful attempts to understand her parents, both immigrants to the US, by returning to their original or adopted hometowns in Italy and Germany, as well as various alcohol-fueled bathroom mishaps in restaurants and hotels. Although the madcap adventures are presented in non-chronological order, the book's trajectory traces a gentle arc from 20-something Geraldine's neuroses to 30-something Geraldine's slightly calmer and more accepting approach to life, as she comes to the important realization that getting lost is not the worst thing that can happen to you, and sometimes it might take you where you really need to go. In turns heartwarming and hilarious, "All Over the Place" is one of the best travel books I've read in a long time.

    My thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing a review copy of this book. All opinions are my own.

  • Robin

    I expected more of a travelogue about the places DeRuiter's been and what she's seen (and how many time she got lost) but this wasn't so much about travel as much of a candid memoir about the author's personal growth and marriage. The title "All over the Place" could also describe not only where she's traveled but also the broad range of emotions and struggles she has endured over the years.

    DeRuiter is a marvelous and humorous writer and despite being a wee bit disappointed that I didn't get mo

    I expected more of a travelogue about the places DeRuiter's been and what she's seen (and how many time she got lost) but this wasn't so much about travel as much of a candid memoir about the author's personal growth and marriage. The title "All over the Place" could also describe not only where she's traveled but also the broad range of emotions and struggles she has endured over the years.

    DeRuiter is a marvelous and humorous writer and despite being a wee bit disappointed that I didn't get more travel stories (for that I could go to her blog), it was still a great read and I loved it.

    Those who read

    and found it a little self-indulgent but kept reading for Gilbert's personal and world journeys should find this book a little more to their liking.

    Thanks to Hachette for the print advance copy.

  • Cindy (Thoughts From a Page) Burnett

    All Over the Place had me laughing so hard at times that I had tears streaming down my face. Geraldine DeRuiter has written a travel memoir unlike any other travel memoir that I have read, and the result is fabulous. She writes about both her travels around the world and her own internal journey through brain cancer, spousal trouble, and dealing with her hilarious mother (more hilarious when you are not the one having to deal with her I am sure). DeRuiter manages to cover numerous destinations t

    All Over the Place had me laughing so hard at times that I had tears streaming down my face. Geraldine DeRuiter has written a travel memoir unlike any other travel memoir that I have read, and the result is fabulous. She writes about both her travels around the world and her own internal journey through brain cancer, spousal trouble, and dealing with her hilarious mother (more hilarious when you are not the one having to deal with her I am sure). DeRuiter manages to cover numerous destinations that I have now added to my list of places to see while telling absolutely hysterical stories about her time in each place.

    My favorite stories were the one about her mom bringing a pickax through airport security and the time she and her husband went to Italy to meet her relatives and see the towns her grandparents grew up in. I laughed so hard at a section of the Italy story that I had to put the book down for a few minutes to recover. I also love that she is completely prepared for a zombie apocalypse.

    The book ends with the following sentence about traveling which will stay with me for a long time: “Even if you don’t end up where you planned, you still might end up somewhere great.” This is a great motto to keep in mind when taking a trip, but even more broadly to remember in our day-to-day lives. I also have to mention that I was so excited to see in the Acknowledgements that DeRuiter shares my obsession with Hamilton. I was not aware of her blog but plan to locate it and start following it.

    I am so glad I read this book and highly recommend it to everyone. It is a quick read that I finished in one sitting. Thanks to PublicAffairs and NetGalley for the chance to read this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  • Amy Secretan

    I devoured this book. As a long time fan of the author's blog The Everywhereist, I have followed Geraldine's (mis)adventures for years, and have enjoyed them all immensely. Her book is no less enjoyable. It is warm and honest and moving and hilarious and BEAUTIFULLY written. It is not, as the author explains, a true travel memoir, in that it won't teach you how to travel. But Geraldine has never claimed to be a travel writer, she's a writer who happens to travel a lot, and gets to talk about wha

    I devoured this book. As a long time fan of the author's blog The Everywhereist, I have followed Geraldine's (mis)adventures for years, and have enjoyed them all immensely. Her book is no less enjoyable. It is warm and honest and moving and hilarious and BEAUTIFULLY written. It is not, as the author explains, a true travel memoir, in that it won't teach you how to travel. But Geraldine has never claimed to be a travel writer, she's a writer who happens to travel a lot, and gets to talk about what she learned while doing it. Her story is about discovering yourself, and what happens along the winding and sometimes dead-end road that you take to get there. I reread several passages over again, because they are so profoundly insightful about what it means to know who you are and how you came to be that person. I wish I could read it again for the first time, but I'll just have to settle for buying it for everyone I know and then getting to revisit the story over and over again with them.

  • Amalia Gavea

    This memoir is one of those cases when the title actually matches the book perfectly. And I mean it in the best way possible. It is a lovely creation, a memoir full of hilarious moments (and some really moving ones) and the most unique travel book I’ve ever read.

    I tend to be cautious when I choose to read a memoir, because there were quite a few instances when self-indulgence took control of the writer and destroyed everything. Also, travel books can easily become boring, in my opinion. Here, Ge

    This memoir is one of those cases when the title actually matches the book perfectly. And I mean it in the best way possible. It is a lovely creation, a memoir full of hilarious moments (and some really moving ones) and the most unique travel book I’ve ever read.

    I tend to be cautious when I choose to read a memoir, because there were quite a few instances when self-indulgence took control of the writer and destroyed everything. Also, travel books can easily become boring, in my opinion. Here, Geraldine DeRuiter has created a delicious account of journeys that are of special importance and are related to key moments of her life. New York, Paris and Ireland are in a prominent position but the real star of the book is Italy. This is what made me love it even more since my family on my mother’s side is Italian, coming from Napoli (Naples in English). We’re talking Southern Italy here, a beautiful, wild, sunny place. You have been warned...

    Geraldine comes across as a lovely person, but you will find no trace of self-indulgence. She apparently has unlimited resources of patience to deal with her mother, unlimited resources of love for her husband and, most importantly, unlimited resources of courage to overcome a very serious obstacle. I really enjoyed the way she narrates her experiences and the optimism that comes from her writing. I bet that she must be a wonderful travelling companion. She is quirky and weird and down-to-earth.

    I’m not a fan of blogs outside of our book community but judging from this book, I should definitely start reading hers. If you want a memoir that balances humour, life experiences and adversities, along with beautiful descriptions of Italy, then ‘’All Over The Place’’ should find a place in your reading schedule.

  • Thomas Strömquist

    I'd never heard about the author or her blog before, but was so smittened by my friend Amalias

    (I won't mind if you just follow that link and read hers instead, it's better than this one) that I decided to give it a go with no further ado. I'm glad I did, since this

    I'd never heard about the author or her blog before, but was so smittened by my friend Amalias

    (I won't mind if you just follow that link and read hers instead, it's better than this one) that I decided to give it a go with no further ado. I'm glad I did, since this was a great read and perfectly suited for a lazy day or two under a beach umbrella. I did browse a few reviews now and, while mostly positive, there were some mentioning expecting more travel, or more blog-like or so.

    Going in blind, I expected nothing and got a very good and nicely written memoire that moves from the funny (here the author has a knack for the kind of not overdone self-criticism that is so hard to balance), the tragic and very much of love and unabashed admiration for the people closest to her. Yes, it gets awfully sentimental. No, I didn't mind. A light, fun, moving and recommended read!

  • Alexis

    Discovered Geraldine DeRuiter after I googled my guide for a township tour and found out that we'd taken the same tour. I promptly went and read all her blog entries about South Africa. She's a funny, witty writer who concentrates on the wonder of the world, and her connection with other people. She also doesn't pretend that she is some intrepid explorer and comes off as an ordinary woman who has a hard time finding her way around. I did laugh out loud at a few places in this book and found it a

    Discovered Geraldine DeRuiter after I googled my guide for a township tour and found out that we'd taken the same tour. I promptly went and read all her blog entries about South Africa. She's a funny, witty writer who concentrates on the wonder of the world, and her connection with other people. She also doesn't pretend that she is some intrepid explorer and comes off as an ordinary woman who has a hard time finding her way around. I did laugh out loud at a few places in this book and found it a quick and easy read.

    I thought this was also a book about family and romance as much as it was about love.

Top Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. We uses Search API to find the overview of books over the internet, but we don't host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners, please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them. Read our DMCA Policies and Disclaimer for more details.