Dark Cities by Christopher Golden

Dark Cities

An anthology of horror stories in urban settings whether back alleys, crumbling brownstones, gleaming high-rise towers, or city hall. Terrifying urban myths, malicious ghosts, cursed architecture, malignant city deities, personal demons (in business or relationships) twisted into something worse virtually anything that inspires the contributors to imagine some bit of urban...

Title:Dark Cities
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:1785652664
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:400 pages

Dark Cities Reviews

  • Strega
    May 30, 2017

    Excellent creepy short stories around a central theme of cities.

  • Pamela Scott
    May 27, 2017

    Dark Cities is a great collection of contemporary horror stories. I love it. I thought every story was great. The stories are not what you traditionally think of as horror stories, but the tales are dark and sinister. I loved every one. The stories are dark sinister and creepy as hell. I’ll think twice about walking along through city streets at night after reading these. I must confess I had bit of a Buffy fan-girl when I read Amber Benson’s story (she pl

    Dark Cities is a great collection of contemporary horror stories. I love it. I thought every story was great. The stories are not what you traditionally think of as horror stories, but the tales are dark and sinister. I loved every one. The stories are dark sinister and creepy as hell. I’ll think twice about walking along through city streets at night after reading these. I must confess I had bit of a Buffy fan-girl when I read Amber Benson’s story (she played Tara in case you didn’t know). I loved every story but the ones that unsettled me the most were In Stone, What I’ve Always Done, The Maw and The Stillness. I’d highly recommend this collection.

  • The Grim Reader (Beavisthebookhead.com)
    Jun 24, 2017

    A couple of bumps, but overall a very good anthology. Review soon.

  • Andrea
    May 22, 2017

    This has some absolutely excellent short stories in not all of which are blatantly horror but a rather strong stomach is required to get past the first story which does involve a form of bestiality.

    The final story by M.R Carey is however brilliant and really the sort of thing to stop you sleeping at night.

    Of course some stories were a tad mediocre but this being a short story collection it's easy enough to flip past the ones that aren't holding your interest or even just plow through them as no

    This has some absolutely excellent short stories in not all of which are blatantly horror but a rather strong stomach is required to get past the first story which does involve a form of bestiality.

    The final story by M.R Carey is however brilliant and really the sort of thing to stop you sleeping at night.

    Of course some stories were a tad mediocre but this being a short story collection it's easy enough to flip past the ones that aren't holding your interest or even just plow through them as none are more than 20 minutes reading long.

  • Paul
    May 26, 2017

    (I freely admit to some bias as my story "The Society of the Monsterhood" is in this anthology)

    Very cool collection of horror/dark fiction set in cities. Nathan Ballingrud's story "The Maw" kicked my ass, dragged me out into the city square, and then kicked my ass some more. Ow.

  • Lois Alston
    Jun 02, 2017

    It read like a bunch of unfinished stories. They were all along the lines of Stephen King stories. Some of the worst things you could think of actually happening.

  • Craig
    Jun 13, 2017

    Sometimes I read anthologies from front to back, first to last as they appear. Other times I skip around, picking out the authors I know I like and then going back to pick up the ones that are new to me or that I haven't been overly impressed with previously. Luckily, this time I indulged in the cherry-picking peripatetic style, reading the stories by Maberry and McGuire, Burke and Benson, Green and Golden (sometimes alliteration happens, what can you do?), Lebbon and Lansdale & Landsdale, f

    Sometimes I read anthologies from front to back, first to last as they appear. Other times I skip around, picking out the authors I know I like and then going back to pick up the ones that are new to me or that I haven't been overly impressed with previously. Luckily, this time I indulged in the cherry-picking peripatetic style, reading the stories by Maberry and McGuire, Burke and Benson, Green and Golden (sometimes alliteration happens, what can you do?), Lebbon and Lansdale & Landsdale, first, and then the others. If I would have read the first story first I would have tossed the book aside and never finished it; it's an awful, offensive piece, but the other eighteen stories are pretty good. There are nice, understated, very British pieces from Helen Marshall and the famous Ramsey Campbell; a funny recursive story by Sherrilyn Kenyon; a good kids/monsters story by Paul Tremblay; a very moody family story by Cherie Priest, a good short punchy tale by Tananarive Due, etc., etc. My favorite was a unique story by Nathan Ballingrud, though I really did enjoy reading the whole lot... after page fifty-six, that is.

  • Mark Smith-briggs
    Jun 24, 2017

    It's near impossible to give anthologies five stars but this one got close. There are some truely amazing yarns in this one, led by Scott Smith and Nick Cutter. Not every story hit the mark - but it was more of a personal taste thing than a quality factor - but more than often they did. Consistently very good, often great, this is one hell of a ride.

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