12 Ways Your Phone Is Changing You by Tony Reinke

12 Ways Your Phone Is Changing You

Do You Control Your Phone—Or Does Your Phone Control You? Within a few years of its unveiling, the smartphone had become part of us, fully integrated into the daily patterns of our lives. Never offline, always within reach, we now wield in our hands a magic wand of technological power we have only begun to grasp. But it raises new enigmas, too. Never more connected, we see...

Title:12 Ways Your Phone Is Changing You
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:1433552434
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:224 pages

12 Ways Your Phone Is Changing You Reviews

  • Ivan
    Jan 29, 2017

    This book is convicting and hope-giving, and should be required reading for every Christian today. I read a pre-pub version in January and immediately made changes in my smartphone use.

    What I appreciate about Tony Reinke's book is that it doesn't merely provide a checklist of behaviors to change but an entire approach—a worldview—to (re)establish. He wants us to be deliberate, others-minded, and God-honoring in our use of smartphones rather than being used (mastered?) by them.

    Not only is Tony

    This book is convicting and hope-giving, and should be required reading for every Christian today. I read a pre-pub version in January and immediately made changes in my smartphone use.

    What I appreciate about Tony Reinke's book is that it doesn't merely provide a checklist of behaviors to change but an entire approach—a worldview—to (re)establish. He wants us to be deliberate, others-minded, and God-honoring in our use of smartphones rather than being used (mastered?) by them.

    Not only is Tony well-versed in the latest research (look at the numerous footnotes), he also grounds all he does in the timeless truth of God's revelation. I think it's fair to conceive of this book as a biblical theology of technology.

    If you're like me and have often felt guilty about your smartphone (mis)use, then pick this book up. I know it'll serve you well. (Read a pre-pub version in January and a final version after publication.)

  • Jeanie
    Jun 17, 2017

    No matter what your stance on social media, what extreme you hold, it behooves us to know the implications of social media. This is not shame text but a text that w

    No matter what your stance on social media, what extreme you hold, it behooves us to know the implications of social media. This is not shame text but a text that will empower you to not be manipulated and to get back to reality of real relationships.

    Social media traps our heart in ways that that our grandparents never had to deal with but I do think it reveals our hearts like no other generation as well. Not that we are worse generation before but that we are the same. Social media is a distraction that we need to control. In all things, there is good and evil and Reinke gives a great word on both.

    He explains the challenge in the digital age is twofold.

    On the external front: Are we safeguarding ourselves and practicing smartphone self-denial?

    On the internal front: Are we simultaneously seeking to satisfy our hearts with divine glory that is, for now largely invisible?

    Our insecurities are put in play with the social media world that we lose reality and become more narcissistic. Our need for validation, likes, applause does the opposite of what the gospel calls. This is a battle that WE all face.

    The twelve ways:

    We are addicted to distraction

    We ignore our flesh and blood

    We crave immediate approval

    We lose our literacy

    We feed on the produced

    We become like what we like

    We get lonely

    We get comfortable in secret vices

    We lose meaning

    We fear missing out

    We become harsh to one another

    We lose our place in time.

    I think this last presidential election really speaks to this. I think social media in all its efforts to grow love they have only grown hate. Not addressing that differences are good in our efforts to love another. This text is so needed for our time as Christians to fight for the gospel and those that do not see the beauty of the Gospel.

  • Drew Miller
    Apr 20, 2017

    In my opinion, this is the most important book released in some time. It is fundamental in helping us see how our smartphones affect us in both the good and the bad. I found Tony's balance to be most helpful in that he presents the facts and his opinions, but leaves the application up to ones leading of the Spirit. The way he contrasts the temporary and the eternal is hands down my favorite part of this book. If you are interested in why social media is so attractive (often addicting), and why y

    In my opinion, this is the most important book released in some time. It is fundamental in helping us see how our smartphones affect us in both the good and the bad. I found Tony's balance to be most helpful in that he presents the facts and his opinions, but leaves the application up to ones leading of the Spirit. The way he contrasts the temporary and the eternal is hands down my favorite part of this book. If you are interested in why social media is so attractive (often addicting), and why you find it so hard to put your phone down, this book is for you. 12 Ways Your Phone Is Changing You clearly belongs in the must read category.

  • Logan
    Jun 18, 2017

    This is an incredibly timely and challenging book. I appreciated Tony's approach of, "Hey, I'm a tech user and a Christian too. Let's talk about how the two work together" as opposed to a legalistic anti-tech perspective. That's not to say Tony is pro-tech: there's a few chapters that will make you want to get rid of your smartphone. And that's not necessarily a bad thing.

    What's most impressive is how Tony is ultimately pushing the reader to consider Christ and Heaven above all else and ask the

    This is an incredibly timely and challenging book. I appreciated Tony's approach of, "Hey, I'm a tech user and a Christian too. Let's talk about how the two work together" as opposed to a legalistic anti-tech perspective. That's not to say Tony is pro-tech: there's a few chapters that will make you want to get rid of your smartphone. And that's not necessarily a bad thing.

    What's most impressive is how Tony is ultimately pushing the reader to consider Christ and Heaven above all else and ask the question, "How does my tech use lead into the Gospel". All in all, it's a fantastic book that every Christian who engages with technology and social media ought to read.

  • Calvinist Batman
    May 09, 2017

    (I listened to the audiobook version of this book on my iPhone. An irony that is not lost on me.)

    This is a book you will hate. One that you will love. One that you will love to hate. And one that you will hate to love.

    Why?

    Because this book is a mirror to your heart, and at some point while reading this book, your heart/flesh will hate it. It will scream at you, try to deceive you, try to tell you that no that's not

    you. He's talking about other people. Or there are reasons you have to be

    (I listened to the audiobook version of this book on my iPhone. An irony that is not lost on me.)

    This is a book you will hate. One that you will love. One that you will love to hate. And one that you will hate to love.

    Why?

    Because this book is a mirror to your heart, and at some point while reading this book, your heart/flesh will hate it. It will scream at you, try to deceive you, try to tell you that no that's not

    you. He's talking about other people. Or there are reasons you have to be like this. The end justifies your addiction.

    Don't believe that voice.

    Which is why you'll love this book. Whether your heart likes it or not, your spirit & mind knows it needs someone to give you a self-check in areas like this. So let's talk about the book.

    Reinke's writing in this book is in top form. He weaves words like Batman weaves punches. What I loved most about this book is that it shows the problem and gives a biblical solution to it WITHOUT being legalistic. He evens calls out all the technology haters and shows them why they are wrong to hate God's good gifts just because people use them for evil.

    This book drips joy from the very first pages. John Piper's foreward is great. Hearing the poll stats/metrics and what that means is heartbreaking. Reinke's sections on FOMO, vices, and loneliness are some of his best. But his chapter on harshness is a must read for everyone who engages on social media, especially for people who like to involve themselves in discernment or watchdog blogs, accounts, or sites.

    There were only two things I really missed. The first is that I wished Reinke did the narration for the audiobook. The man they used gets a little monotone and in a number, stat, and technology filled book, we need a more human emotional voice. Not a robotic one.

    The second was I wish Reinke had given a more personal narrative at times. There are news stories here and there, but the book lacks a more emotional real-life true-story look at this issue. He gave that look at his TGC17 breakout and I was hopeful it would be in this book, but it wasn't. The book doesn't suffer much from it, but it would have made this book a hard 5 stars for me instead of the 4.5 stars I round up from mentally.

    Regardless, this is a book you'll want to read and then read again and then give to a friend. And I can't recommend enough that you do just this.

  • Alex Sofranko
    May 29, 2017

    This book is a must read for any Christian alive in the 21st century. Reinke's writing is fantastic and engaging. Something I truly appreciate is amount of thought and research that went into his writing. This is made apparent by the abundance of notes at the end of each chapter. I also love that Reinke makes it obvious from the start that he isn't anti-smartphone and that he is actually more pro-smartphone. The book covers the many ways that we are inevitably impacted by technology as Christian

    This book is a must read for any Christian alive in the 21st century. Reinke's writing is fantastic and engaging. Something I truly appreciate is amount of thought and research that went into his writing. This is made apparent by the abundance of notes at the end of each chapter. I also love that Reinke makes it obvious from the start that he isn't anti-smartphone and that he is actually more pro-smartphone. The book covers the many ways that we are inevitably impacted by technology as Christians in a technological age. This book will for sure change the way I interact with my technology in light of my identity in Christ.

  • Omar
    Jun 26, 2017

    The obvious point of this book is to point out that our smartphones are changing us, for better or worse.  I thought Reinke had a very balanced approach to the topic as he urges us to, “

    "

    Reinke has obviously done his homework and draws on the research of many others concerning the ways our phones affect us.  He quotes Seth Godin as saying "

    The obvious point of this book is to point out that our smartphones are changing us, for better or worse.  I thought Reinke had a very balanced approach to the topic as he urges us to, “

    "

    Reinke has obviously done his homework and draws on the research of many others concerning the ways our phones affect us.  He quotes Seth Godin as saying "

    " and then adds the observation that, "

    He brings up some very valid points as he cautions us to think wisely about our use of this constantly-connected technology.  As he points out; "

    "

    In the end, he does not conclude that everyone should ditch their smartphones, though that may be best for some, but that all of us must at least be aware of the ways we are being changed by this technology and the inherent dangers it represents.

  • Mark Jr.
    May 31, 2017

    The best way to summarize this book is probably to let the author do it.

    The best way to summarize this book is probably to let the author do it.

    Sounds pretty dire. But Reinke is, at heart, a technophile, not a technophobe; and he doesn’t conclude from these dangers that every Christian needs to smash his smartphone. He offers positive practices in place of the negative.

    A few more thoughts:

    One question that really stuck out to me, toward the end of the book: do I deserve to spend time on social media trivialities right now? Sobering.

    Another question Reinke pressed on me helpfully is one I have to ask all the time, especially in my line of work as a professional blogger: do I have an unhealthy interest in validation-through-social-shares? That one’s tough when your job description involves increasing social shares.

    Chapter 11 was really excellent, about slander and "outrage porn."

    I sometimes wonder how much of our society’s public worry (and public kvetching) over the dangers of technology will seem quaint to our great grandchildren—like those who worried around the turn of the 20th century that people wouldn’t be able to breathe if cars exceeded 10 miles per hour, because the air would be rushing by too fast. But we’re not our grandkids. We’re us. I can’t shake the feeling that the world really has changed, that the Internet has amplified our fallenness more than it has increased our virtue. The overall tone of Reinke’s book is one of gentle warning and instruction, and I think that’s perfectly appropriate.

    This is definitely my new go-to book for wisdom on the use of consumer technology. (Dyer’s From the Garden to the City is a good complement to it.)

    The reader in the Christian Audio production was smooth and serviceable, though (to be a little too frank?) a little too much like a male version of Siri for my tastes. This book called for reading with a little more feeling, a little more homiletical intensity. But I was able to go triple speed (is that ironic?) and understand perfectly.

    I got this book for free for review purposes from Christian Audio, but they attached no strings to my opinions.

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