The Girl Who Knew Too Much by Amanda Quick

The Girl Who Knew Too Much

Amanda Quick, the bestselling author of ’Til Death Do Us Part, transports readers to 1930s California, where glamour and seduction spawn a multitude of sins…When Hollywood moguls and stars want privacy, they head to an idyllic small town on the coast, where the exclusive Burning Cove Hotel caters to their every need. It’s where reporter Irene Glasson finds herself staring...

Title:The Girl Who Knew Too Much
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:0399174478
Edition Language:English
Number of Pages:355 pages

The Girl Who Knew Too Much Reviews

  • Anna's Herding Cats

    Reviewed for

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    Amazon:

    A peek into the glamorous and oh so scandalous world of 1930s Hollywood? Amanda Quick? A retired magician and a heroine on the run? Yes, please! The Girl Who Knew Too Much captured me completely.

    This was a little different than most I've read from Quick since it's set in Hollywood in the 1930s but I ended up really enjoying the setting. The glamour, scandal, grit, the mystery and illusions behind tinseltown. It was a fun

    Reviewed for

    .

    Amazon:

    A peek into the glamorous and oh so scandalous world of 1930s Hollywood? Amanda Quick? A retired magician and a heroine on the run? Yes, please! The Girl Who Knew Too Much captured me completely.

    This was a little different than most I've read from Quick since it's set in Hollywood in the 1930s but I ended up really enjoying the setting. The glamour, scandal, grit, the mystery and illusions behind tinseltown. It was a fun time watching Irene and Oliver--who met when she discovered a dead body at his exclusive hotel--join forces to figure out the secrets Hollywood is ruthlessly trying to hide.

    Irene and Oliver. Irene's recently reinvented herself as a gossip columnist after escaping a dangerous past. She's quick, smart and like a dog with a bone. She smelled a "story" and she wasn't going to give up until she figured out who was behind the string of deaths that kept popping up around one of Hollywood's leading men. And Oliver--A former magician who was gravely injured and had to reinvent himself as well. He could be a little gruff now and again and play things close to the chest but I loved him and that even if she exasperated him now and again he supported Irene and was determined to help her figure out what was going on. He's so a caretaker, too, making sure everyone around him is provided for.

    Their romance is a bit slow moving and takes a back seat to the mystery but it was fun watching them work together and break down each other's barriers. There's a tiny bit of heat but not much. I did think things escalated a bit too quickly at the end commitment-wise but it was deal-able.

    All in all, I had a grand time with The Girl Who Knew Too Much. With her usual magic Quick brought to life a bygone era full of danger, mystery and glitter...with a few twists and turns thrown in when least expected. I just love that. I'm definitely hoping there will be more from this cast of characters. It certainly sounded like there's potential for future stories. *fingers crossed*

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    11/4 *flails about* Can I resist reading this until closer to release date? Gah! I don't think I can! I don't think I can!

    Amazon:

  • Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede

    I have to admit that I'm quite besotted with this cover. I like how different it is, the crisscrossing of colorful squares over the image of the girl and I love the combination of the colors. Now, you should not choose a book just because of the cover, but I'm the first one to raise my hand to admit that I do it over and over again. But, I'm a bit cautious when it comes to historical romance because it's just not often my type of book. However, I discovered Amanda Quick years ago and she is one

    I have to admit that I'm quite besotted with this cover. I like how different it is, the crisscrossing of colorful squares over the image of the girl and I love the combination of the colors. Now, you should not choose a book just because of the cover, but I'm the first one to raise my hand to admit that I do it over and over again. But, I'm a bit cautious when it comes to historical romance because it's just not often my type of book. However, I discovered Amanda Quick years ago and she is one of few authors that I have come to like when it comes to historical romance. And, that's because her books have an element of suspects to them. And nothing spices a romance as a crime.

  • Faith

    This book read like a parody of a bad B-movie. Maybe that was intentional, but it certainly is not a writing style that I enjoy. Everything was explained rather than just showing actions and letting the reader draw their own conclusions. "She hesitated. Something told her that she had to know what was inside the velvet bag. Perhaps the contents will explain what had happened that night." The dialogue felt stilted and artificial. Also, details seemed off, like when a character demanded to be made

    This book read like a parody of a bad B-movie. Maybe that was intentional, but it certainly is not a writing style that I enjoy. Everything was explained rather than just showing actions and letting the reader draw their own conclusions. "She hesitated. Something told her that she had to know what was inside the velvet bag. Perhaps the contents will explain what had happened that night." The dialogue felt stilted and artificial. Also, details seemed off, like when a character demanded to be made vice president of a law firm although firms aren't structured that way (but maybe they were in the 1930s?). In any event, I was not liking this book so I abandoned it and I don't feel inclined to try anything else by this author.

    I received a free copy of this book from the publisher.

  • ☕ Kimberly

    Amanda Quick (Jayne Anne Krentz) always manages to pull me into her stories and THE GIRL WHO KNEW TOO MUCH offered an interesting cast of characters. Irene Glasson is hiding a secret, and Oliver Ward is determined to discover it. As the two begin to investigate, they find themselves facing down danger and finding passion. I connected with Irene and admired her spunk and quick wits. She is tenacious and once she gets a hold of a story she just doesn't let go. Oliver was an interesting character,

    Amanda Quick (Jayne Anne Krentz) always manages to pull me into her stories and THE GIRL WHO KNEW TOO MUCH offered an interesting cast of characters. Irene Glasson is hiding a secret, and Oliver Ward is determined to discover it. As the two begin to investigate, they find themselves facing down danger and finding passion. I connected with Irene and admired her spunk and quick wits. She is tenacious and once she gets a hold of a story she just doesn't let go. Oliver was an interesting character, from his connections to the secret he carries that resulted in him walking with a limp. He protects those he cares about, and he quickly decides Irene needs his help.

    Quick gives us two mystery threads. The first involves Irene and her former life. We are even privy to the thoughts of those who seek her. This was a dark thread that added suspense to an already interesting murder case that's connected to Nick Tremayne. I loved the different suspects and players involved. Quick did a great job of sharing their mindset, throwing down red herrings and providing twists. All of this allowed me to slip into the world and become involved.

    I absolutely loved the setting and Quick easily captured the atmosphere, glitz, and glamor of the 1930s Hollywood scene. Her characters felt authentic, and the murder mystery threads offered surprises that kept me flipping the pages.

    The romance that develops takes a backseat to the mystery plot, but we do get brief moments of passion and discovery. Their relationship felt genuine, and they worked well together, but for me, this was the weakest thread in the tale. There really wasn't enough page time to allow the romance itself to simmer, but Quick writes a compelling story that held its own, and I actually wouldn't mind meeting this couple in a future mystery.

    Copy provided by the publisher.

  • Pouting Always

    After her boss is murdered unexpectedly and leaves her with a mysterious notebook Anna flees New York and heads out to LA. Anna hides out there by changing her name to Irene and getting a job at a third rate gossip magazine to keep a low profile. While on an assignment for the magazine Irene goes to meet an aspiring movie star who has some information on a famous actor. Unfortunately when Irene arrives at the spa where she's meeting the actress, the actress has drowned and Irene hears someone ch

    After her boss is murdered unexpectedly and leaves her with a mysterious notebook Anna flees New York and heads out to LA. Anna hides out there by changing her name to Irene and getting a job at a third rate gossip magazine to keep a low profile. While on an assignment for the magazine Irene goes to meet an aspiring movie star who has some information on a famous actor. Unfortunately when Irene arrives at the spa where she's meeting the actress, the actress has drowned and Irene hears someone chasing her. Even though she manages to escape, Irene gets tangled up in a series of murders as she tries to prove that Nick Tremayne, the famous actor involved with all the women, is the one who's behind the murders.

    The plot is kind of a mess to begin with, there was no reason to layer the two arcs together with Anna and the notebook as well as the mystery of who's killing all the women. It made everything seem convoluted and hard to believe. Same thing with who ends up being the murderer, it felt like a cope out so the author could just pull a plot twist. The resolution of the notebook thing also was so tidy and convenient. The execution of the book wasn't good and didn't work for me at all.

  • Christina ~ Brunette Reader

    Set in the 1930s, a first for Amanda Quick, against the backdrop of a luxury hotel on the West Coast,

    for the Hollywood jet-set, and revolving around a woman on the run hiding a compromising notebook, a former magician and a killer on the loose, in the hands of a skilled author in her element with this genre

    made for a solid mystery with strong romantic undertones.

    Nicely conveying the glamour of that era and written in a smooth prose punctuated b

    Set in the 1930s, a first for Amanda Quick, against the backdrop of a luxury hotel on the West Coast,

    for the Hollywood jet-set, and revolving around a woman on the run hiding a compromising notebook, a former magician and a killer on the loose, in the hands of a skilled author in her element with this genre

    made for a solid mystery with strong romantic undertones.

    Nicely conveying the glamour of that era and written in a smooth prose punctuated by lively dialogues, I just wished for a more even pace and more time given to building the relationship between the leads, but as a whole a very enjoyable read.

  • Caz

    Anyone who has read or listened to even a small number of Amanda Quick’s historical mysteries will have realised that her books tend to be somewhat formulaic. I’m not saying that’s necessarily a bad thing; Ms. Quick’s particular formula – independent heroine meets mysterious, slightly dangerous hero and they solve a mystery while falling in love (and have their first sexual encounter anywhere else

    Anyone who has read or listened to even a small number of Amanda Quick’s historical mysteries will have realised that her books tend to be somewhat formulaic. I’m not saying that’s necessarily a bad thing; Ms. Quick’s particular formula – independent heroine meets mysterious, slightly dangerous hero and they solve a mystery while falling in love (and have their first sexual encounter anywhere else but a bed!) – is a popular and successful one, and I have no problem with formulaic when it’s done well. I wanted to listen to

    mostly because the setting of 1930s Los Angeles is a departure from the author’s usual setting of 19th Century England, and being a bit of an old movie buff, I was looking forward to a noir-ish mystery with a touch of good old Hollywood glamour. Sadly, however both the noir and the glamour were missing and the mysteries – there are two of them – were very predictable.

    Adding to my disappointment was the narration by Louisa Jane Underwood, which did nothing to help an already lacklustre book and in fact, made listening to it a chore rather than a pleasure. Had I not been listening for review, I’d have DNFed and returned it to Audible.

    You can read the rest of this review at

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  • ♥Rachel♥

    Irene Glasson has come to California to escape a dangerous killer. She reinvents herself from personal secretary into an up-and-coming journalist for a small time gossip paper. While she’s on the hunt for a story she finds herself embroiled in another murder mystery, but this time she’s got Oliver Ward on her side. They work as partners to catch a murderer, all the while a simmering attraction brews between them!

    I was surprised by how much I enjoyed

    . It’s the perfect s

    Irene Glasson has come to California to escape a dangerous killer. She reinvents herself from personal secretary into an up-and-coming journalist for a small time gossip paper. While she’s on the hunt for a story she finds herself embroiled in another murder mystery, but this time she’s got Oliver Ward on her side. They work as partners to catch a murderer, all the while a simmering attraction brews between them!

    I was surprised by how much I enjoyed

    . It’s the perfect summer read! An engaging mystery set in the 1930s on the California coast. Dramatic cliffs overlooking the blue-green ocean are the backdrop for the Burning Cove Hotel, a Spanish style beauty that caters to the rich and famous, including glamorous silver screen stars.

    Oliver Ward, a once famous magician and illusionist extraordinaire, is now the proprietor of this luxurious haven, and he has a strict policy excluding reporters and photographers. That doesn’t stop Irene Glasson, from getting her scoop, though. Unfortunately, her private invitation is marred by the murder of a woman and Irene is caught in the middle of a dangerous situation all over again.

    I love the time period this mystery is set in: the 1930s is a time of art deco, dressing up for dinner, dancing and cocktails, and old Hollywood glamour. Burning Cove Hotel with its elegant old world Spanish style may have looked like:

    The setting was fantastic, but the mystery and romance are what kept me glued to the pages. Filled with thrills and danger, attraction and romance,

    is a fast, addictive, fun mystery, and I loved it!

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