Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

Meet Eleanor Oliphant: She struggles with appropriate social skills and tends to say exactly what she’s thinking. Nothing is missing in her carefully timetabled life of avoiding social interactions, where weekends are punctuated by frozen pizza, vodka, and phone chats with Mummy. Then everything changes when Eleanor meets Raymond, the bumbling and deeply unhygienic IT guy...

Title:Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:0735220689
Edition Language:English
Number of Pages:327 pages

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine Reviews

  • Elyse

    Update.....I found a copy in my notes from last year ---

    Here is the review I wrote right after I read it. I realize - almost a year later I can still remember so much about this story: ELEANOR is a terrific character ... and this book is great!!! Even GROWS on you!!!

    Eleanor Oliphant, almost 30 years old, is one of those odd characters we think we may have seen before in our books --- lonely - awkward - lacking social skills. She doesn't have filters when it comes to saying what she's thinking. Y

    Update.....I found a copy in my notes from last year ---

    Here is the review I wrote right after I read it. I realize - almost a year later I can still remember so much about this story: ELEANOR is a terrific character ... and this book is great!!! Even GROWS on you!!!

    Eleanor Oliphant, almost 30 years old, is one of those odd characters we think we may have seen before in our books --- lonely - awkward - lacking social skills. She doesn't have filters when it comes to saying what she's thinking. Yet....Eleanor Oliphant has a

    uniqueness that only she can claim.

    Eleanor goes to the same office job - M-F 8:30 to 5:30 every day. She works as a finance clerk. She takes an hour lunch break. We know her weekday supper routines and her weekend menu. Weekends are frozen pizza, vodka, and phone chats with Mummy.

    Eleanor's life changes after she meets Raymond, a co-worker IT guy. His sloppy -unkempt style doesn't bother Eleanor-she never had any friends to begin with and she wasn't a fashion queen herself.

    Raymond and Eleanor help a man, Sammy, who took a fall -- and the three of them become allies for each other. They begin to unleash from their individual isolated lives

    and bond together in a heartwarming friendship.

    This story really makes you realize how valuable one friend can be. Eleanor had been stuck in ways she didn't even have the eyes to see - let alone do anything about it.

    But it's Raymond -his goodness- that ultimately helps Eleanor mend her broken heart....by helping her face areas of her painful childhood she has avoided.

    The story is broken down into three sections:.

    Good Days

    Bad Days

    Better Days

    Tender- touching - and plenty of heart.

    This is another book that I read last year… The book was given to me last summer. I wrote a review but I have no idea where it is.

    I do remember enjoying it!! I still have the book in my house. I'm walking now, I can research the review or look through the book later but it was quirky and enjoyable.......NEVER FOUND IT THROUGH GR's .... but I had a copy!

  • Cheri

    !! NOW AVAILABLE !!

    4.5 Stars

    Eleanor Oliphant is lacking the social awareness that would have her filter her comments, or even consider for a moment that she needs to do so. She’s a unique individual with a unique view on the world and how it works – especially as it relates to people.

    !! NOW AVAILABLE !!

    4.5 Stars

    Eleanor Oliphant is lacking the social awareness that would have her filter her comments, or even consider for a moment that she needs to do so. She’s a unique individual with a unique view on the world and how it works – especially as it relates to people.

    Approaching 30 years old, Eleanor is a charming, quirky, socially naïve, emotionally awkward young woman who leads a lonely life, she has worked in the same office for eight years now, in the same job, a finance clerk. She has her routine down and no aspirations for the future of rising in the ranks. An hour for lunch, her crossword puzzles, her weekly conversations with Mummy, these are the constants of her life. Variations in routine send her into a momentary tizzy; too many deviations send her reaching for her vodka. She avoids socializing, but will make an appearance as needed for a work related event, but only to avoid more unwanted attention that she would undoubtedly be subjected to should she choose not to attend. Ideally, she would prefer to blend in with the paintings on the walls, the furniture, the woodwork. That is, until she sees him, the man Mummy always told her would be right for her. For him, she might risk being seen.

    When she requires IT help at work, she meets Raymond, she does a quick assessment of his grooming and wardrobe shortcomings, while he is new enough not to be put off by her awkwardness, he leaves her feeling as though he views her as normal – which in itself is an oddity in her workplace.

    In the awkward getting-to-know-you phase of a work friendly relationship, Raymond and Eleanor happen to be in the right place at the right time, at least for Sammy Thom, when they see him collapse in the street. Suddenly, they are thrust into Sammy’s life, sitting bedside at his hospital bed, hoping for his recovery, meeting his family, and becoming an extended part of Sammy’s family.

    Eleanor is prodded into forsaking her routines, stepping outside of her comfort zone once Raymond and Sammy enter the picture. She begins to feel noticed in a good way, and begins to try to believe in life, in goodness. Believe in someone besides Mummy.

    Little by little I was charmed by this overwhelmed, damaged woman-child, her odd view of the world, her dislike of proper grammar when texting, her take on “human mating rituals” such as flirting, her incredulity that anyone would want to be her friend, her slow unearthing of her own voice, her discovery that others might enjoy her company. It felt a little bit like that iconic moment in 1984’s Academy Award’s acceptance speech, when Sally Field said: “You like me, right now, you like me!”

    Although this covers some rather calamitous childhood events, it is done without any sensationalism. It incorporates some of the coping mechanisms, as well as some of the causes of the physical and emotional scars of her childhood.

    Eleanor Oliphant shows us the significance of kindness, the consequence of the absence of kindness, and the magnitude of even a small gesture of kindness.

    A wonderfully uplifting debut novel!

    Pub Date: 9 May 2017

    Many thanks for the ARC provided by Penguin Group Viking / Pamela Dorman Books

  • Diane S ☔

    What an absolutely fantastic character Eleanor is, a character that grew on me the more I read. She has had a scarred childhood, though we don't learn exactly what happened until later in the story, she wears the evidence on her face. She remembers little from that time only knows she was burned in a fire. Raised in a series of group homes, given an apartment by social services who still check on her though she is now thirty. She has few social skills, is very matter of fact, has no friends, few

    What an absolutely fantastic character Eleanor is, a character that grew on me the more I read. She has had a scarred childhood, though we don't learn exactly what happened until later in the story, she wears the evidence on her face. She remembers little from that time only knows she was burned in a fire. Raised in a series of group homes, given an apartment by social services who still check on her though she is now thirty. She has few social skills, is very matter of fact, has no friends, few filters and has a schedule that she keeps to, a job she likes and insists she is fine. Until a crush with a musician and an IT guy named Raymond derails her schedule and her life.

    Why did I give this five stars? It is a first book, with nary a misstep, an assured book with amazing writing and character development. Plus it is difficult to take a book with so few characters, and not only make it interesting enough to keep the reader immersed, but to let us see the way Eleanor changes and grows throughout the story. There is much humor, there is also sadness and I came to embrace this character in all her strangeness, loved when she figured things out and came to terms with her past. There are a few places where the author could have gone overboard on sweetness but she kept true to the character of Eleanor and just managed to stay on the border, without crossing over. This is a book I will remember, it was that good and meaningful, in my opinion.

    Looking forward to great things from this new author, she is a true talent.

    Thanks to my friend Esil who told me to grab this one.

    ARC from publisher.

  • Deanna

    My reviews can also be seen at:

    ALL THE STARS !!!

    I won an advanced copy of this book through a Goodreads giveaway. Thank you!

    To be honest, I'm not sure if this book would have been on my radar if I hadn't won it. Although the great reviews may have pulled me in. At any rate, I am so happy I read it.

    I LOVED THIS BOOK !!

    Just like it says in the title of the book, Eleanor Oliphant is completely fine....well she thinks she is. She is honestly not worried that

    My reviews can also be seen at:

    ALL THE STARS !!!

    I won an advanced copy of this book through a Goodreads giveaway. Thank you!

    To be honest, I'm not sure if this book would have been on my radar if I hadn't won it. Although the great reviews may have pulled me in. At any rate, I am so happy I read it.

    I LOVED THIS BOOK !!

    Just like it says in the title of the book, Eleanor Oliphant is completely fine....well she thinks she is. She is honestly not worried that she may be missing out on anything. She is content with her life.

    Eleanor is a little bit....odd. She's very intelligent and well-spoken with impeccable grammar (thanks to Mummy) but she lacks the ability to filter what she says and therefore she will tell you exactly what she's thinking. This can lead to very awkward situations.

    Eleanor is comfortable with her routines. She's worked at the same job for nine years. She starts work at 8:30, at lunch she buys a newspaper which she reads from cover to cover and then does the crossword. She finishes out her day, leaving work at 5:30. Eleanor listens to the Archers as she makes a simple dinner (usually pasta and salad - one pan one plate), watches TV or reads for a little while then off to bed at ten. Her weekday routine only changes on Wednesday when she talks with "Mummy" for ten minutes.

    Weekends are a bit different. After work Friday she picks up pizza, wine and two big bottles of Vodka for the weekend. She drinks the vodka over the weekend.....in a state where she's neither drunk nor sober, waiting for Monday to come. No one comes over and she doesn't go anywhere to visit. She sometimes wonders if she's a figment of her own imagination.

    But she's fine with it. She's fine. There's nothing missing, she doesn't need anyone else. Well that was what she told herself. But then it happens...

    Now Eleanor is on a mission. First she decides a make-over is in order....and where she starts is both shocking and hilarious. I really want to write about what happened but I think I would spoil a very funny moment for many readers.

    Things don't go exactly as planned.

    When her computer at work stops working she meets Raymond from IT. An easy-going guy, Raymond is intrigued by Eleanor, but she's just not interested. She's busy trying to re-create herself for the man of her dreams. But after work one day Eleanor and Raymond come across a man who has fallen on the sidewalk. Together they help the man, Sammy and so begins a friendship along with the start of many changes in Eleanor's life.

    The story is told from Eleanor's point of view. We go along for the ride as she navigates her way through her life, learning to stand up for herself. But it won't be easy. Secrets and memories that have been tucked away for many years can be painful to remember.

    When you have trouble with social skills I can see how it would be easier to refrain from situations where things could go wrong so fast..... It would be easier being alone. As I mentioned there are many funny moments throughout the book. I really like how the author wrote these parts. I never felt like I was laughing AT Eleanor but at the things she said or the situations she ended up in. However, there are also many sad and painful moments. Times where I felt terrible for Eleanor.

    Some of the funniest parts came out of nowhere - the phone doesn't ring often but if telemarketers call Eleanor whispers "I know where you live" and hangs up. Often it was what she would be saying to herself that was funny.

    An incredible read that had me bouncing from one emotion to the next. The author did a tremendous job bringing these wonderfully unique characters to life.

    It's hard to believe this is the author's debut novel.

    There are so many words that can be used to describe this novel - hilarious , unique, heartwarming, heartbreaking, charming, hopeful, inspiring, and COMPLETELY unforgettable.

    You should read it!!

    HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!!

  • Susanne Strong

    5 Stars.

    At thirty years-old, Eleanor Oliphant is alone in this world. She always has been, actually. In and out of foster care since she was a little girl, she has never been touched by anyone in a loving way and doesn’t even know what that would

    5 Stars.

    At thirty years-old, Eleanor Oliphant is alone in this world. She always has been, actually. In and out of foster care since she was a little girl, she has never been touched by anyone in a loving way and doesn’t even know what that would feel like, but that’s ok. All of her physical needs are met, you see and she has never had any emotional needs.

    Seeing as she doesn’t have any friends, Eleanor is quiet and socially awkward. Everyone thinks she is fairly strange, if you must to know. Not that she minds since people’s behavior makes absolutely no sense to her. She is good at being alone and she does not feel sorry for herself. Not even when ‘Mummy’ calls and viciously tells her daughter off and berates her for being being “naughty.” Eleanor, however wears a coat of armor and does her best to let her mother’s words bounce off of her.

    Eleanor has no aspirations though she has done accounting at an office for the last 9 years. Every day of her life is the same and she would be nothing without routine. One night, all of that changes rather abruptly. After work, she and a coworker named Raymond whom she just met and who happens to be leaving the office at the same time as her, find themselves in the exact right place at the right time. Both Eleanor and Raymond see a man (named Samuel), go down on the sidewalk and they go have a look see and discover that he needs an ambulance. This incident ends up tying the three together and becomes one of the most significant in Eleanor Oliphant’s life. It forges a bond of friendship between them, which is something Eleanor has never experienced before in all her thirty years.

    During this time, Eleanor also ends up finding him. The man she has been waiting for all of her life. The man she is meant to be with. Now she just has to get him to notice her. In trying to do so, Eleanor grows bolder and more confident. She also learns to lean on and open herself up to her new friends.

    Throughout the book, Eleanor slowly experiences a metamorphosis, one that often makes you smile, laugh and of course, cry. She is damaged and quirky but oh so special. I loved her dearly. For more reasons than one. I identified with Eleanor Oliphant you see, and for that, I was unprepared. I did say that this book wrecked me right?! I get why Eleanor is Completely Fine. She had no choice. Unfortunately, Eleanor’s ‘Mummy’ is someone I recognized fairly well. When I heard her voice (in a Scottish accent) on the audiobook, and the way she spoke to her daughter, my chest got tight and my throat closed up and I sobbed. Unlike Eleanor's “Mummy” however, mine happens to be British instead of Scottish - though the accents are close, thus I therefore guess that listening to the audiobook had an even more profound effect on me. I’ve had similar conversations, in case it wasn’t obvious and I felt Eleanor’s pain more deeply as it related to her ‘Mummy’, for at certain times in my life, it mirrored my own. All that aside however, Eleanor does not go quietly into the dark goodnight (and neither did I, for what it’s worth).

    Published on Goodreads and Amazon on 6.26.17.

  • Pouting Always

    Eleanor Oliphant lives a fairly secluded life due to her lack of social graces and crippling self esteem and anxiety issues. She works at a graphic design firm in the finance department and spends the rest of her time at home, usually drinking. Her social life consists of a phone call with her mummy every week. Then one day she goes to a concert, for which she won tickets in a raffle, and falls in love at first sight with a musician. Eleanor decides to make some changes to herself as part of a p

    Eleanor Oliphant lives a fairly secluded life due to her lack of social graces and crippling self esteem and anxiety issues. She works at a graphic design firm in the finance department and spends the rest of her time at home, usually drinking. Her social life consists of a phone call with her mummy every week. Then one day she goes to a concert, for which she won tickets in a raffle, and falls in love at first sight with a musician. Eleanor decides to make some changes to herself as part of a plan to get her dream man. Meanwhile a new hire in the IT department of her company, Raymond, strikes up a friendship with Eleanor. As things change for Eleanor she is forced to confront the past and confront the real reason for her recent desire for more.

    I really enjoyed this, oh man Eleanor is so quirky and endearing. Her inner monologue was excellent and I could really relate to her. I had an especially visceral reaction when

    because come on who hasn't had a moment like that. I've had my fair share of moments when I try really hard and then just feel embarrassed and stupid about everything I've done. Eleanor just felt so real and human. The only thing that annoyed me was the ending when

    because it felt unnecessary and I didn't think we needed a plot twist like it kind of ruined all her conversations with her mom for me a little bit. Everything else was really great though, definitely 4.5 stars.

  • Larry H

    I'd rate this 4.5 stars.

    I'll admit, when I started reading Gail Honeyman's debut novel,

    , I thought about issuing a moratorium on quirky characters who can't seem to pick up social cues or are oblivious to how people usually behave when interacting with peers, coworkers, those who provide service, and others. Obviously these are colorful characters to write about—it seems as if the literary world is full of them.

    But the more time I spent with Eleanor Oliphant

    I'd rate this 4.5 stars.

    I'll admit, when I started reading Gail Honeyman's debut novel,

    , I thought about issuing a moratorium on quirky characters who can't seem to pick up social cues or are oblivious to how people usually behave when interacting with peers, coworkers, those who provide service, and others. Obviously these are colorful characters to write about—it seems as if the literary world is full of them.

    But the more time I spent with Eleanor Oliphant, I realized that her behavior was more the result of circumstance than will, nurture if you will, rather than nature. And then I thought about how boring the world might be if everyone acted the way they were expected to, said the right things, and never expressed their true feelings. (Lord knows if I couldn't roll my eyes, my head might explode.)

    Eleanor lives by her routines. She eats the same meals, wears the same clothes, has her weekly chat with Mummy, and has her weekend rituals, which include frozen pizza and enough vodka to keep her pleasantly drunk all weekend. For the most part, she eschews interactions with her coworkers, whom she mostly thinks are daft and lazy. They make fun of her both behind her back and in front of her, and she doesn't really care.

    "I do not light up a room when I walk into it. No one longs to see me or hear my voice. I do not feel sorry for myself, not in the least. These are simply statements of fact."

    Two things happen which throw her routines off-kilter. First, while attending a concert with a coworker, she spots a handsome musician and is quickly smitten. She has decided that he is the one for her, and starts to ready herself for their first encounter, during which she knows he'll sweep her off her feet and they'll live happily ever after. She needs a makeover and new clothes, and she starts doing research on her soon-to-be-beloved.

    Meanwhile, one afternoon she and Raymond, the IT guy from her office, whom she considers poorly groomed and a bit bumbling, save the life of an elderly man who falls in front of them. Saving Sammy's life suddenly gives Eleanor two unexpected relationships, friendships, that she has never had before. She still acts the way she believes to be appropriate, and says things that most wouldn't, but she begins liking the feeling of belonging, of companionship, which she never realized she wanted.

    "Some people, weak people, fear solitude. What they fail to understand is that there's something very liberating about it, once you realize that you don't need anyone, you can take care of yourself. That's the thing: it's

    just to take care of yourself. You can't protect other people, however hard you try. You try, and you fail, and your world collapses around you, burns down to ashes."

    Eleanor's social awkwardness, her lack of a filter, her inability to grasp exactly how people expect her to behave, actually hides a great deal of secret pain, pain and memories even she has hidden. And when she is forced to start recognizing just what a burden she has carried for so much of her life, and who was responsible, it threatens to break her. Suddenly she realizes she may need to do something she never has—depend on others, and reveal things about herself she's always kept hidden, in order to move forward. If she wants to.

    is really a special book. Even if some of Eleanor's behaviors are similar to other quirky characters you might have seen, she is totally unique, and while off-putting, just absolutely wonderful. You both marvel and are saddened by the burdens she has carried, and how she copes with them. I found myself becoming protective of her, worrying there would come an instant where someone made a total fool out of her (with her own help, of course).

    Honeyman really did a terrific job with Eleanor. Even as she began letting down her guard, Honeyman kept her character consistent, but never let her become unsympathetic. While this is certainly Eleanor's story, I liked the other characters as well, although they certainly didn't get as much attention. I thought the ending was a little too pat for my taste, but I really enjoyed this overall, and don't think I'll be forgetting Eleanor or her story anytime soon.

    God bless the people who challenge our notions of "appropriate" and "normal," because they are what keeps our world interesting!

  • Emily May

    Eleanor Oliphant is completely 100% fine. She goes to her office job five days a week and then treats herself to a frozen pizza and a bottle of vodka on a weekend. She lives alone and doesn't have any friends, but that's okay. She's doing real well, thank you very much.

    Except maybe she isn't.

    caught me completely unawares. I'll be honest - I picked it up because it got some buzz and the author is British, but it actually turned out to be one of those

    Eleanor Oliphant is completely 100% fine. She goes to her office job five days a week and then treats herself to a frozen pizza and a bottle of vodka on a weekend. She lives alone and doesn't have any friends, but that's okay. She's doing real well, thank you very much.

    Except maybe she isn't.

    caught me completely unawares. I'll be honest - I picked it up because it got some buzz and the author is British, but it actually turned out to be one of those

    . Maybe like some combination of

    ,

    ,

    and

    . It takes a serious, traumatic issue and weaves it into a warm, funny and, yes, sometimes sad tale.

    I read a lot of books and many characters come and go. Some are well-developed and interesting, others less so. But on a rare occasion I find one of those truly memorable characters that will stay with me a long time. Eleanor is one of them. She is

    in a way that puts my teen self to shame. She is literal to a degree that everyone finds odd. It's painful to witness and yet so, so endearing.

    I think I like this book so much because it is actually really sad, but never manipulative. On a surface level, it's a very funny novel about a socially-inept twenty-nine year-old woman. Her attempts to become "normal" and integrate into society by having manicures and waxes are sources of hilarity. But it is very sad. It's sad when we see her coworkers talking about her, but Eleanor is oblivious to their scorn. It's sad how alone in life she is. It's sad when she "falls in love" with an idea of a person.

    It's not a romantic book and I'm glad. There are hints that the central relationship will eventually develop into romance, but this is really a book about Eleanor. I am thankful that the author didn't cure Eleanor and lead her out of the darkness by having her fall in love. Being happy and achieving greater self-worth should, in my opinion, never be linked to romance.

    I really enjoyed it. It's great to find a book so packed full of emotion without seeming overly-sentimental.

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