Hallelujah Anyway: Rediscovering Mercy by Anne Lamott

Hallelujah Anyway: Rediscovering Mercy

From the bestselling author of Help, Thanks, Wow and Stitches comes a powerful exploration of mercy, its limitless (if sometimes hidden) presence, why we ignore it, and how we can embrace itMercy is radical kindness, Anne Lamott writes in her enthralling and heartening book, Hallelujah Anyway. It's the permission you give others--and yourself--to forgive a debt, to absolve...

Title:Hallelujah Anyway: Rediscovering Mercy
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:0735213585
Edition Language:English
Number of Pages:176 pages

Hallelujah Anyway: Rediscovering Mercy Reviews

  • Rebecca Foster

    I’ve read all of Lamott’s nonfiction, and am quite fond of her rambly theological memoirs. Although this is probably one of her two weakest books, her fans will want to read it anyway. The overall theme is a bit loose and the personal anecdotes seem tired and/or thin on the ground, especially in the early chapters (she argues with her son about an unwise comment she made about a transgender person; she tries to resist buying an expensive sweater), which mostly hold forth on the struggles o

    I’ve read all of Lamott’s nonfiction, and am quite fond of her rambly theological memoirs. Although this is probably one of her two weakest books, her fans will want to read it anyway. The overall theme is a bit loose and the personal anecdotes seem tired and/or thin on the ground, especially in the early chapters (she argues with her son about an unwise comment she made about a transgender person; she tries to resist buying an expensive sweater), which mostly hold forth on the struggles of a generic “you” or “we.” Chapters 3 and 7 are highlights, though, and eventually she starts drawing in more apposite stories, like one about a trip to Japan and another about helping with the funeral for a man who committed suicide. But in general I think this pales in comparison with her best books, and

    did she miss an opportunity to turn her old Dubya ire against Donald Trump. (The title is from a Candi Staton song. Releases April 4th.)

    “mercy is a cloak that will wrap around you and protect you; it can block the terror, the dark and most terrifying aspects of your own true self.”

  • Clara

    For me, Anne Lamott's nonfiction books on living in faith (and I don't mean denominational Faith) are not individual volumes but one continuing narrative. I mean this as a compliment. True, some books are slighter than others, either literally or figuratively, but all are needed and welcome. If you're a human being who struggles --with everything from trying to make sense of the current political environment to envying your girlfriend who, unlike you, doesn't have to contend with an arthritic hi

    For me, Anne Lamott's nonfiction books on living in faith (and I don't mean denominational Faith) are not individual volumes but one continuing narrative. I mean this as a compliment. True, some books are slighter than others, either literally or figuratively, but all are needed and welcome. If you're a human being who struggles --with everything from trying to make sense of the current political environment to envying your girlfriend who, unlike you, doesn't have to contend with an arthritic hip -- Anne Lamott is the friend who listens, empathizes, eats ice cream with you, and then suggests you go for a walk together to lubricate that hip. Maybe next week you'll talk about organizing that letter-writing campaign for immigration reform, or maybe not, but knowing that you're in the muck together makes the struggle easier. And from time to time, when you do something that helps or strengthens you or someone else, you know that it's because you and your friend and others like her are members of the same club, trying--mostly failing, but sometimes succeeding--to experience and share moments of grace.

  • KBev

    I must admit that this is my first book that I've read by her, but I really, really loved it. It was exactly what I needed to her. This world could definitely use more mercy and kindness.

  • Kelly Hager

    Every time Anne Lamott releases a book, it is somehow just what I needed to read.

    I definitely struggle with forgiving people, and I do fully grasp that the only one hurt by this is me. (People should never be allowed to keep hurting you, and one of the ways they can do that is if you keep dwelling on it, and them.)

    One of the things I love most about Anne Lamott is that she seems to struggle with this, too, and she'll have these amazingly witty one-liners, things that are so me and I will totall

    Every time Anne Lamott releases a book, it is somehow just what I needed to read.

    I definitely struggle with forgiving people, and I do fully grasp that the only one hurt by this is me. (People should never be allowed to keep hurting you, and one of the ways they can do that is if you keep dwelling on it, and them.)

    One of the things I love most about Anne Lamott is that she seems to struggle with this, too, and she'll have these amazingly witty one-liners, things that are so me and I will totally agree and keep reading and the next thing I know, she nails me with absolute truth and I never see it coming. Very tricky!

    Highly recommended.

  • Lisa

    I'm sorry to be giving this book such few stars, but it was mostly a miss for me. I love Anne Lamott's writing - she can be funny and biting and tender all at once. But this writing was often rambling and repetitive, with little of her usual humor. There were many times I had to reread a particular passage in order to understand what she was trying to say and to try to figure out how it fit in with the passages before or after it. I've always loved reading snippets of her life as she related the

    I'm sorry to be giving this book such few stars, but it was mostly a miss for me. I love Anne Lamott's writing - she can be funny and biting and tender all at once. But this writing was often rambling and repetitive, with little of her usual humor. There were many times I had to reread a particular passage in order to understand what she was trying to say and to try to figure out how it fit in with the passages before or after it. I've always loved reading snippets of her life as she related them to her point, but there weren't enough of them in this book, and several of the ones she did include I'd read/heard from her previously. Ultimately, there were a few chapters or passages that really spoke to me, though.

  • Diane S ☔

    I generally read anything this author writes but even if I didn't the title in this one made it a must read. This world needs more mercy and compassion, it is I feel sorely lacking. Although I found this offering more scattered, less concentrated than her usual works, some of what she talks about just seems like common sense, there are as always phrases and thoughts that amaze.

    One of the things that I like about Lamott is that even though she quotes the bible often, she also, admits that it is

    I generally read anything this author writes but even if I didn't the title in this one made it a must read. This world needs more mercy and compassion, it is I feel sorely lacking. Although I found this offering more scattered, less concentrated than her usual works, some of what she talks about just seems like common sense, there are as always phrases and thoughts that amaze.

    One of the things that I like about Lamott is that even though she quotes the bible often, she also, admits that it is not as easy in every day life to practice everything it teaches. We are human, and as she admits she has thoughts that are contrary to how she wants to feel, behave.

    I loved this thought, "Everything slows down when we listen and stop trying to fix the unfixable. We end up looking into other people's eyes and see the desperation, or let them see ours. This connection slips past the armor like water past stones. Being slow and softened, even for a few minutes or seconds, gives sneaky grace the chance to enter." This is easy to remember, that by just listening we may be of help, show a form of mercy.

    A nice, thoughtful book about ways to show mercy, caring and love, not easy at times, but something of limitless value.

  • Diane Barnes

    Just okay. Maybe me, maybe her, but nothing special about this one.

  • Literary Chic

    This is what I get for rushing to load my Kindle before vacation. I though it said from the author of "THE Help." Oh the power of a tiny article! This author wrote a book called "Help..." not "THE Help."

    Anyway, the wordy first person testimony didn't work for me. It came across as condescending. I totally agree that we need to be more merciful. Our society gets entirely too much enjoyment from finding fault in my opinion. However, this book didn't make that point well enough for me to recommend

    This is what I get for rushing to load my Kindle before vacation. I though it said from the author of "THE Help." Oh the power of a tiny article! This author wrote a book called "Help..." not "THE Help."

    Anyway, the wordy first person testimony didn't work for me. It came across as condescending. I totally agree that we need to be more merciful. Our society gets entirely too much enjoyment from finding fault in my opinion. However, this book didn't make that point well enough for me to recommend its reading.

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