Release by Patrick Ness

Release

Inspired by Mrs Dalloway and Judy Blume's Forever, Release is one day in the life of Adam Thorn, 17. It's a big day. Things go wrong. It's intense, and all the while, weirdness approaches...Adam Thorn is having what will turn out to be the most unsettling, difficult day of his life, with relationships fracturing, a harrowing incident at work, and a showdown between this ga...

Title:Release
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:1406377279
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:287 pages

Release Reviews

  • Raeleen Lemay
    Feb 07, 2017

    ACTUALLY DYING over the US cover. I'm 100% obsessed 10/10 need it now

  • Korrina  (OwlCrate)
    Feb 23, 2017

    Wow. Just wow. I read this book in just a few short hours, completely transfixed from the first page. There's something very special about Patrick Ness's writing.

  • Sarah
    May 26, 2017

    3.5 stars.

    This book was like two stories in one. At first, it seemed to me like the stories weren't really connected at all and the change from one story to the other felt like a disconnect. I felt that disconnect between the two right up until that amazing ending where the two stories overlapped in such a wonderful way. I appreciate a great ending and that ending was so so fantastically beautiful, I loved it. I sort of wish the two stories would have been more interconnected throughout but the

    3.5 stars.

    This book was like two stories in one. At first, it seemed to me like the stories weren't really connected at all and the change from one story to the other felt like a disconnect. I felt that disconnect between the two right up until that amazing ending where the two stories overlapped in such a wonderful way. I appreciate a great ending and that ending was so so fantastically beautiful, I loved it. I sort of wish the two stories would have been more interconnected throughout but then I know that that ending wouldn't have been so amazing if they were. For a very long time, I only liked Adam's story. I found the ghost story to be sort of confusing but then towards the end, I started to like it. I also thought the writing in the ghost chapters wasn't as enjoyable as the writing in Adam's chapters.

    Something that was absolutely fabulous was the openness that Adam and Angela had. There was no holding back at all, especially when it came to talking about sex and relationships. Sometimes YA books hold back when it comes to talking about sex but this book was like a breath of fresh air. Their friendship was awesome. It felt authentic and special and I loved it. The romance was also so sweet.

    I would recommend this.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    "It was so much easier to be loved than to have to do any of the desperate work of loving."

    "the pain is so distant as to be in another room."

    "His chest burned, so much he couldn't tell where the anger stopped and the wound began. Because there was always a wound, it seemed, kept freshly opened by a family who also kept saying they loved him."

  • Romie
    Jun 15, 2017

    It's Patrick Ness, I shouldn't even be surprised to realize I loved this book so damn much.

    I truly think this book is only about a few things : friendship, heartbreak, brotherhood, acceptance, and realizing blood doesn't mean family.

    You could say I loved the friendship between Angela and Adam, it was probably one of the purest things ever. In your life you always have this one friend you can talk about anything and everything with . . . that's who Adam and Angela are for ea

    It's Patrick Ness, I shouldn't even be surprised to realize I loved this book so damn much.

    I truly think this book is only about a few things : friendship, heartbreak, brotherhood, acceptance, and realizing blood doesn't mean family.

    You could say I loved the friendship between Angela and Adam, it was probably one of the purest things ever. In your life you always have this one friend you can talk about anything and everything with . . . that's who Adam and Angela are for each other, this very special friend. They have each other's back, they don't feel the need to judge what the other does . . . they've been friends for so long they don't even need the other to say it out loud when something is wrong, they just know.

    Adam's heart is broken. Broken by his first love and by his family. It's just broken and it won't heal, no matter what he does. And the thing is, he doesn't even know why it's still broken.

    Adam was in relationship with a guy once - stupid asshole - who made him feel like the most amazing and beautiful person in the world . . . just before crushing him and making him feel worthless. I don't think you can call this an abusive relationship, but it wasn't healthy. Enzo kept on taking and taking and taking without ever giving. He didn't care about what it was like to be Adam. He told Adam he loved him and then he took it back. He took it all back. Made him feel unloved. Even when Adam is in a relationship with amazing Linus - my precious savage son - he's still heartbroken and afraid.

    Then we have Adam being heartbroken over his family . . . his family who just won't accept him the way he is . . . a family who truly thinks that praying will ‘heal’ their son of his gayness, a family who scared this son away. You're supposed to love your child unconditionally, no matter what . . . you're not supposed to make him feel unloved.

    Last thing. When your son comes to you and say his boss is sexually harassing him, don't say he asked for it. Never. How could you do that to your own son?

    I wasn't the biggest fan of Marty at first, but I knew he wasn't truly bad. He said some stupid shit he learned from his dad, but that wasn't him speaking, it never was him. And when he finally realized he had to think for himself, I wanted to hug him and say something like "You go Glen Coco" just because I felt like it.

    At some point, enough is enough. You can't be treated like shit all your life. You can't pretend everything is okay when it's not. You can't look like you're happy when you're definitely not.

    At some point you have to move on, you have to let go. You have to admit what you once had is gone. You have to do what's good for you.

    When Adam finally saw how toxic his parents were, when he realized he had people waiting for him to ask for help . . . that's when he understood his parents weren't his real family. Because you create your family with people who deeply love you no matter what. People who won't think less of you for who you are.

    //

    Also I would like to quickly mention the side story . . . at first I wasn't sure if I liked it or not, but thought out the book I saw how much sense it made. This story just had to be here. And I really ended up liking it!

    //

    This book made me cry. I found myself so much in Adam, and I just wanted to hug and protect him. I wanted things to be okay for him.

  • Kai
    Feb 17, 2017

    3,5 Stars

    was one of my most anticipated reads this year and one that I had preordered as soon as I had heard of it. Patrick Ness is one of the most taltented authors that I know.

    was hauntingly beautiful and emotional while

    was eerie and scary as hell, but nevertheless beautiful.

    was brutal and twisted, too much so in my opinion, and

    3,5 Stars

    was one of my most anticipated reads this year and one that I had preordered as soon as I had heard of it. Patrick Ness is one of the most taltented authors that I know.

    was hauntingly beautiful and emotional while

    was eerie and scary as hell, but nevertheless beautiful.

    was brutal and twisted, too much so in my opinion, and

    was just lacking in something.

    I'm afraid I have to say the same thing about

    . I expected a great contemporay novel. In a way it was: a wide range of likeable characters with depth, teen angst, coming of age characteristics, family issues, love and sex. What threw me off was the weird paranormal part of this book, a part that seemed almost trivial. It was very similar to

    . We basically have to parallel plots that hardly ever overlap. The coexist but don't touch. It's two different stories in one book, and I'd rather have two standalone books than this strange mix-up. It would have worked much better that way. Maybe TROUJLH and Release are set in the same fictional world and have a connection that I fail to see.

    The thing is that Patrick Ness is an outstanding writer with so much potential! Why not focus on one storyline alone? I know both stories could have been fantastic in the way some of his previous books were.

    What I love about Release is the writing and especially the humour. There were a few laugh-out-loud moments and I enjoyed it through and through. I also want to thank him for being so open-minded about gay sex in YA novels. The sex scene(s) don't feel dirty or cringe-worthy in any way. He manages to go into detail without really going into detail. It's far from smut-fiction (which I am

    glad about), simply normal, romantic, important, emotional and fun. The YA genre needs more of that.

    I can't wait to see what the future holds for Patrick Ness. He just announced that he will be writing the screenplay for the

    movie starring Daisy Ridley and Tom Holland. I have high hopes for this adaption - and for his future novels.

  • Emily May
    Apr 10, 2017

    I am so

    . I'm not even sure how I feel about

    overall. It's

    - one I absolutely loved, and the other I just didn't enjoy at all.

    Ness is one of those authors who never writes the same book, or same kind of book, twice. Liking one is no guarantee you w

    I am so

    . I'm not even sure how I feel about

    overall. It's

    - one I absolutely loved, and the other I just didn't enjoy at all.

    Ness is one of those authors who never writes the same book, or same kind of book, twice. Liking one is no guarantee you will like another. I absolutely adored his Chaos Walking trilogy -

    ,

    and

    , I thought

    was a beautiful middle grade book, and I loved what Ness did in

    . However,

    didn't work for me, and I thought

    was clever, but boring.

    is a strange story, heavily influenced by

    and Judy Blume's

    . In fact, it's a little meta for my tastes (kind of like

    was) and even includes direct references to

    in the story, whilst the first and last lines are plays on the first and last lines of

    .

    When I said it felt like there were two books in one, that's because the story alternates between a day in the life of Adam Thorn, and

    about a faun and a queen, which clearly had something to do with the recent death of a meth addict, but I'm still not 100% sure I get what the hell was going on.

    Adam Thorn's story, on the other hand, is

    . He is the gay son of a preacher, struggling against his family's beliefs, trying to ward off the sexual advances of his boss, and working through some serious heartbreak... all in the space of one day. The book manages to cover sex, love, friendship, family and loss in so few pages, and in such a moving way.

    Adam's chapters are

    . His ultimate realization towards the end of the book carries with it that certain bittersweetness that only comes with the letting go of someone you loved deeply.

    But I just didn't enjoy the experimental style of the other chapters. I'm sure it was supposed to be deep and meaningful, but the choice to add it felt cold and intellectual in a book that was otherwise so emotionally tense. I wanted more Adam, less weird.

    I would hesitate before recommending this book. Though Adam's story was compelling and his character so well-drawn, a lot of this short book is taken up with metaphoric wanderings into the weird and - sometimes it seemed - nonsensical. But maybe smarter people than me will appreciate it. Otherwise, I recommend reading Silvera's

    instead.

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  • Simon
    May 09, 2017

    Patrick Ness has written what I think could be one of the most important YA fiction novels yet. In Release we meet Adam a young gay man dealing with the conflict of his sexuality and the religious values of his family. In the single day we follow his life we follow him as this conflict reaches a climax and everything else seems to change... Oh, and a murdered girls spirit mingles with a rather veil spirit queens and could be the end of the world. Just a small thing to contend with. Talking openi

    Patrick Ness has written what I think could be one of the most important YA fiction novels yet. In Release we meet Adam a young gay man dealing with the conflict of his sexuality and the religious values of his family. In the single day we follow his life we follow him as this conflict reaches a climax and everything else seems to change... Oh, and a murdered girls spirit mingles with a rather veil spirit queens and could be the end of the world. Just a small thing to contend with. Talking openinly and frankly about sex, friendship and family this is the book every you LGBTQ+ reader should get their hands on in their formative years. I wish I had been able to read a book like this when I was that age, I would have felt less alone and also educated on some of the frank elements of becoming a gay man schools try to avoid. Brilliant.

  • prag ⚓
    Jun 04, 2017

    TW: sexual abuse, murder, homophobia (it’s kind of a dark book at times so just,, think before you pick it up)

    It’s dark, gritty and confusing — but there’s something about it I liked all the same.

    TW: sexual abuse, murder, homophobia (it’s kind of a dark book at times so just,, think before you pick it up)

    It’s dark, gritty and confusing — but there’s something about it I liked all the same.

    There’s so much that happens in an eight chapter novel, it’s a little hard to keep up. In fact, if you asked me to recount all that happened in the book, I probably wouldn’t be able to. (And it’s been about an hour since I finished it.)

    There are two plotlines, two POVs, and it’s safe to say I absolutely hated one of them. It borders on magical realism, it’s basically a dead girl come back as a Queen of another world, out to take revenge on her murderer. Except it’s not as cool as it sounds. It’s not interesting at all.

    Where?? does it make any sense?? I read this page about five times but I’m still at a loss to what it meant.

    but even then, it has bits that made me scream #relatable.

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