Release by Patrick Ness

Release

Inspired by Mrs Dalloway and Judy Blume's Forever, Release is one day in the life of Adam Thorn, 17. It's a big day. Things go wrong. It's intense, and all the while, weirdness approaches...Adam Thorn is having what will turn out to be the most unsettling, difficult day of his life, with relationships fracturing, a harrowing incident at work, and a showdown between this ga...

Title:Release
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:1406377279
Edition Language:English
Number of Pages:287 pages

Release Reviews

  • Warda

    I had to change my rating to 5 stars! It's been a few days and I haven't been able to stop thinking about it. The format of this book and the way the story is told and how it comes so well together was just stunning and such a joy to read.

    I just adore Patrick Ness so much! This story tugged at my heartstrings and the writing was mesmerising!

    This book needs to be read by everyone, just because it's been written by Patrick Ness. The characters he writes, the lessons and the

    I had to change my rating to 5 stars! It's been a few days and I haven't been able to stop thinking about it. The format of this book and the way the story is told and how it comes so well together was just stunning and such a joy to read.

    I just adore Patrick Ness so much! This story tugged at my heartstrings and the writing was mesmerising!

    This book needs to be read by everyone, just because it's been written by Patrick Ness. The characters he writes, the lessons and themes he infuses accompanied with flawless writing is always a guaranteed win.

  • Lala BooksandLala

    Hmm..

  • Raeleen Lemay

    ACTUALLY DYING over the US cover. I'm 100% obsessed 10/10 need it now

  • Korrina  (OwlCrate)

    Wow. Just wow. I read this book in just a few short hours, completely transfixed from the first page. There's something very special about Patrick Ness's writing.

  • Kai

    3,5 Stars

    was one of my most anticipated reads this year and one that I had preordered as soon as I had heard of it. Patrick Ness is one of the most taltented authors that I know.

    was hauntingly beautiful and emotional while

    was eerie and scary as hell, but nevertheless beautiful.

    was brutal and twisted, too much so in my opinion, and

    3,5 Stars

    was one of my most anticipated reads this year and one that I had preordered as soon as I had heard of it. Patrick Ness is one of the most taltented authors that I know.

    was hauntingly beautiful and emotional while

    was eerie and scary as hell, but nevertheless beautiful.

    was brutal and twisted, too much so in my opinion, and

    was just lacking in something.

    I'm afraid I have to say the same thing about

    . I expected a great contemporay novel. In a way it was: a wide range of likeable characters with depth, teen angst, coming of age characteristics, family issues, love and sex. What threw me off was the weird paranormal part of this book, a part that seemed almost trivial. It was very similar to

    . We basically have to parallel plots that hardly ever overlap. The coexist but don't touch. It's two different stories in one book, and I'd rather have two standalone books than this strange mix-up. It would have worked much better that way. Maybe TROUJLH and Release are set in the same fictional world and have a connection that I fail to see.

    The thing is that Patrick Ness is an outstanding writer with so much potential! Why not focus on one storyline alone? I know both stories could have been fantastic in the way some of his previous books were.

    What I love about Release is the writing and especially the humour. There were a few laugh-out-loud moments and I enjoyed it through and through. I also want to thank him for being so open-minded about gay sex in YA novels. The sex scene(s) don't feel dirty or cringe-worthy in any way. He manages to go into detail without really going into detail. It's far from smut-fiction (which I am

    glad about), simply normal, romantic, important, emotional and fun. The YA genre needs more of that.

    I can't wait to see what the future holds for Patrick Ness. He just announced that he will be writing the screenplay for the

    movie starring Daisy Ridley and Tom Holland. I have high hopes for this adaption - and for his future novels.

  • Emily May

    I am so

    . I'm not even sure how I feel about

    overall. It's

    - one I absolutely loved, and the other I just didn't enjoy at all.

    Ness is one of those authors who never writes the same book, or same kind of book, twice. Liking one is no guarantee you w

    I am so

    . I'm not even sure how I feel about

    overall. It's

    - one I absolutely loved, and the other I just didn't enjoy at all.

    Ness is one of those authors who never writes the same book, or same kind of book, twice. Liking one is no guarantee you will like another. I absolutely adored his Chaos Walking trilogy -

    ,

    and

    , I thought

    was a beautiful middle grade book, and I loved what Ness did in

    . However,

    didn't work for me, and I thought

    was clever, but boring.

    is a strange story, heavily influenced by

    and Judy Blume's

    . In fact, it's a little meta for my tastes (kind of like

    was) and even includes direct references to

    in the story, whilst the first and last lines are plays on the first and last lines of

    .

    When I said it felt like there were two books in one, that's because the story alternates between a day in the life of Adam Thorn, and

    about a faun and a queen, which clearly had something to do with the recent death of a meth addict, but I'm still not 100% sure I get what the hell was going on.

    Adam Thorn's story, on the other hand, is

    . He is the gay son of a preacher, struggling against his family's beliefs, trying to ward off the sexual advances of his boss, and working through some serious heartbreak... all in the space of one day. The book manages to cover sex, love, friendship, family and loss in so few pages, and in such a moving way.

    Adam's chapters are

    . His ultimate realization towards the end of the book carries with it that certain bittersweetness that only comes with the letting go of someone you loved deeply.

    But I just didn't enjoy the experimental style of the other chapters. I'm sure it was supposed to be deep and meaningful, but the choice to add it felt cold and intellectual in a book that was otherwise so emotionally tense. I wanted more Adam, less weird.

    I would hesitate before recommending this book. Though Adam's story was compelling and his character so well-drawn, a lot of this short book is taken up with metaphoric wanderings into the weird and - sometimes it seemed - nonsensical. But maybe smarter people than me will appreciate it. Otherwise, I recommend reading Silvera's

    instead.

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  • Simon

    Patrick Ness has written what I think could be one of the most important YA fiction novels yet. In Release we meet Adam a young gay man dealing with the conflict of his sexuality and the religious values of his family. In the single day we follow his life we follow him as this conflict reaches a climax and everything else seems to change... Oh, and a murdered girls spirit mingles with a rather veil spirit queens and could be the end of the world. Just a small thing to contend with. Talking openi

    Patrick Ness has written what I think could be one of the most important YA fiction novels yet. In Release we meet Adam a young gay man dealing with the conflict of his sexuality and the religious values of his family. In the single day we follow his life we follow him as this conflict reaches a climax and everything else seems to change... Oh, and a murdered girls spirit mingles with a rather veil spirit queens and could be the end of the world. Just a small thing to contend with. Talking openinly and frankly about sex, friendship and family this is the book every you LGBTQ+ reader should get their hands on in their formative years. I wish I had been able to read a book like this when I was that age, I would have felt less alone and also educated on some of the frank elements of becoming a gay man schools try to avoid. Brilliant.

  • Lola  Reviewer

    I’m not unfamiliar with Patrick Ness, which is why I expected this book to be strange, weird even, possibly befuddling. But it was actually very comprehensible and not out of the ordinary, if I don’t take in account the random revengeful ghost.

    Having read neither Judy Bloom’s ‘‘Forever’’ nor Virginia Woolf’s ‘‘Mrs. Dalloway,’’ I had no idea what kind of beast ‘‘Release’’ would turn out to be. If there are references to those two novels, I didn’t get them. All I know is that there are two intert

    I’m not unfamiliar with Patrick Ness, which is why I expected this book to be strange, weird even, possibly befuddling. But it was actually very comprehensible and not out of the ordinary, if I don’t take in account the random revengeful ghost.

    Having read neither Judy Bloom’s ‘‘Forever’’ nor Virginia Woolf’s ‘‘Mrs. Dalloway,’’ I had no idea what kind of beast ‘‘Release’’ would turn out to be. If there are references to those two novels, I didn’t get them. All I know is that there are two intertwined stories in this book—a ghost’s and a teenage gay boy’s who is having the Worst Day Ever.

    I liked Adam just fine. I feel as though it’s easier to connect with characters that show their flaws and vulnerable side to the reader, and Adam does that fairly often. His friends and foes—and family—are not so open. We know close to nothing about them. It’s more about how they affect Adam and how Adam perceives them. We do not get their sides of the story.

    That’s okay. It’s not preferable, but this is a short enough novel and Adam is having the Worst Day Ever, so let’s not ask too much of him. His entourage is about to leave him—leaves Linus, whom he knows not what to do with. He’s his boyfriend, but then again, is he really in love with him? So there are things Adam must figure out on this dreadful day.

    Patrick Ness surprised me. The story is mainly focused on Adam and his various relationships—romantic, friendship and family-related. Since Adam is gay and his family is super-religious, this is a taboo subject in his family. But he, himself, is pretty comfortable with his way of life. In fact, the author discusses his sex life very openly, leaving little intimate details for the reader to figure out. That surprised me. It’s a good thing, especially since the topics—sex, masturbating, unrequited love—discussed are relevant to teenagers and many YA authors do not go that far.

    I would definitely decapitate the ghost if given the chance, because she is irrelevant and only a distraction to the main story. What were you thinking, Patrick Ness? The characters didn’t even care about the dead girl. She is mentioned maybe once or twice—extremely briefly—in total. Come on.

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