The Pearl Thief by Elizabeth Wein

The Pearl Thief

Before Verity…there was Julie.When fifteen-year-old Julia Beaufort-Stuart wakes up in the hospital, she knows the lazy summer break she’d imagined won’t be exactly like she anticipated. And once she returns to her grandfather’s estate, a bit banged up but alive, she begins to realize that her injury might not have been an accident. One of her family’s employees is missing,...

Title:The Pearl Thief
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:1484717163
Edition Language:English
Number of Pages:326 pages

The Pearl Thief Reviews

  • Amanda

    I am so happy Elizabeth treated us to another book featuring Julie. So incredibly happy :)))

  • Monica Edinger

    My

    :

    Elizabeth Wein's books offer so much. The worlds she creates are remarkable in their textures; whether they are set in actual historical pasts or fantasy historical pasts, they are rich with touches large and small that bring the worlds alive for readers. She does something similar with characters, making them complex, flawed, and vivid whether they are the ones we care deeply about, those that terrify us, or simply those a bit more on the fringe of the story. All of them feel ful

    My

    :

    Elizabeth Wein's books offer so much. The worlds she creates are remarkable in their textures; whether they are set in actual historical pasts or fantasy historical pasts, they are rich with touches large and small that bring the worlds alive for readers. She does something similar with characters, making them complex, flawed, and vivid whether they are the ones we care deeply about, those that terrify us, or simply those a bit more on the fringe of the story. All of them feel fully rounded, ones we readers inhabit fully as we read. Then there is plot --- Wein is a master at creating complex, driving, tangled, twisty, and unpredictable plots.  Lastly, there is emotion, and not just for the characters --- these are books that set readers' hearts pounding, produce gasps of astonishment, smiles at the wit, and tears of joy and sadness.

    Among Wein's works are two novels set during Word War II: the jaw-dropping, gasp-inducing C

    and the equally dramatic and heartrending 

     Now we have

     a prequel to

    featuring a much younger Julie. I admit I was a bit wary starting the novel, wondering if Wein was pushing too far with the same characters , but I needed have worried. This work is marvelous, as fully realized in all its facets as all the others. While the book isn't out for a while yet, I wanted to get my thoughts down now (in a spoiler free way of course) so as not to have them drift away and to, hopefully, excite those of you waiting for it.

    It is 1938 as the story begins and we meet fifteen-year-old Julie heading home to her family's Scottish estate from her Swiss boarding school for the summer. The death of her grandfather and the need to pay off his extensive debt has meant that the estate has been sold and is being turned into a school. And so Julie's return is bittersweet, her family occupying a few rooms of the place temporarily until they move out for good. Shortly after her arrival she lands in the hospital, having been hit on the head by an unknown assailant and then saved by local Travelers. Things and people go missing, mysteries pile up and Julie, her brother Jamie, and the Traveler siblings Euan and Ellen try to get to the bottom of it all.

    While it has some of the delicious attributes of a cosy mystery, this is far more rich, a highly complex narrative featuring Julie's coming-of-age (emotionally, sexually, and intellectually), the unpacking of family histories (Julie's and the Travelers), direct presentations of period prejudices, all within a riveting plot full of Wein's trademark twists and turns. As in her previous books, Wein creates a rich past world, fascinating characters, dramatic scenes, and great emotional depth. While it is not necessary to have any familiarity with

    , those who have it will enjoy the younger Julie, observing her developing into the young woman that she is later on. Finally, in addition to everything else, Wein is just a wonderful wordsmith. I love her sentences, her dry wit. Say this brief bit on page 47.

    is a complete delight. Highly recommended.

     

  • Cait (Paper Fury)

    I absolutely

    , so when I heard there was going to be a prequel about Julie, I just about lost my left sock in excitement. I am SO PLEASED!! Although fair warning: this is literally

    CNV. It is more like a

    when Julie was 15 and caught up in her family's estate that includes castles, pearls, and the occasional dead m

    I absolutely

    , so when I heard there was going to be a prequel about Julie, I just about lost my left sock in excitement. I am SO PLEASED!! Although fair warning: this is literally

    CNV. It is more like a

    when Julie was 15 and caught up in her family's estate that includes castles, pearls, and the occasional dead man.

    I honestly adored it!! Even though the pace was slow and it didn't punch me in the feels like CNV at all. It just felt lovely anyway. And it actually reminded me a whole lot of my childhood favourite books called Billabong. I DON'T KNOW WHY. They're Aussie and this is Scottish??? But still??? The whole vibe was there and it was just so so nice.

    It was also

    And Jamie is a piece of exceptional sweetness. <3

    Julie is a powerful character. She's totally flawed and privileged and often doesn't even know it and makes kind of awful mistakes because of it...but she wants to

    and be better. PLUS she is all about femininity and being empowered. She doesn't ask permission -- she does things.

    But she doesn't think of herself as broken and I really appreciated that. I also liked how it explored Julie being bisexual and omg I shipped her and Ellen

    .

    because Julie was epic and awesome, and full of wit and intelligence and wasn't afraid to get dirty, but was afraid of ghosts, and loved to be pretty, but could fire a gun. Plus the book is full of Julie's strong female role models who take no shenanigans and just put forth all the epic.

    More books like this??? Please??? It made historical fiction something to admire instead of wade through and cringe at.

    Although it made my heart BREAK at how horribly they were treated. They're called "tinkers" by the locals, (so kind of gypsies) and they're basically abused and railed against at every turn and arughugugh it was

    . I love how Julie becomes friends with Euan and Ellen. And quite frankly Euan is the SWEETEST and most precious cinnamon scone in the world and anyone who beats him will BE DIRECTLY BEATEN BY ME. And Ellen was a piece of frosty ice and absolutely amazing.

    Jamie: Ooh, Julie! You and Euan!

    Julie: *STARING AT ELLEN LIKE 😍😍😍*

    Julie: Mmm? Maybe later.

    I enjoyed the lazy summery pace. And quite frankly

    All old castles and manors and beautifully described rivers of pearls. The writing is just SO GOOD that every scene somehow was lush and delicious and I felt like I was

    , taking my summer in Scotland.

    THE SCOTTISH ACCENTS ARE GORGEOUS and I fully blame the audiobook on the reason I loved it so much. AHHHHHHHH.

    I think you can read it without having read CNV? But I think you'd appreciate it more if you did read CNV first. It's methodical and lush and contains powerful females and a ton of hilarious moments -- coupled with mystery and murder and beautiful old historical items, and an EPIC sister/brother duo, and all the tea you could possibly want. ALSO IT WON MY HEART SO THERE'S THAT.

  • Hailey (HaileyinBookland)

    I enjoyed this, not quite as much as CNV, but I still really enjoyed it! It was awesome to get some backstory on Julie, she's such an interesting character. Overall a great read!

  • Dannii Elle

    You can find my full review on

    .

    Set in 1930s Britain, this focuses on Lady Julia’s return to her grandparents regal home, in the summer of her fifteenth year. However, she isn’t here for a holiday. With the death of her grandfather and the accumulation of a lifetime of debt, the house is to be sold and converted into a school. Julia is to assist her family in organising their ancestral belongings and heirlooms. Further troubles are heaped on this broken family when Julia is struck b

    You can find my full review on

    .

    Set in 1930s Britain, this focuses on Lady Julia’s return to her grandparents regal home, in the summer of her fifteenth year. However, she isn’t here for a holiday. With the death of her grandfather and the accumulation of a lifetime of debt, the house is to be sold and converted into a school. Julia is to assist her family in organising their ancestral belongings and heirlooms. Further troubles are heaped on this broken family when Julia is struck by a mysterious assailant, forcing her into a coma and resulting in memory loss.

    This story had the feel of another timeless classic,

    . The focus of the plot seemed to be about one thing, but was actually addressing larger social issues in a powerful and positive way. Wein’s upfront and unapologetic writing was sometimes witty and sometimes thrilling, but always raw and poignant. She did not deliver just one story, but a multitude of stories all bundled into one narrative.

  • Ashley *Hufflepuff Kitten*

    Finished last night and dove straight back into Code Name Verity.

    I picked up this book without knowing much about it. Yes, there's the blurb, but I didn't really pay attention to that. I just knew I adored Code Name Verity and as this was a prequel to that special book, I was reading it regardless (and hopefully loving it too). As it happens, I did love it. But it certainly wasn't what I was expecting.

    I love the Pearl Thief for the innate Scottishness that infuses every page. I love it for the v

    Finished last night and dove straight back into Code Name Verity.

    I picked up this book without knowing much about it. Yes, there's the blurb, but I didn't really pay attention to that. I just knew I adored Code Name Verity and as this was a prequel to that special book, I was reading it regardless (and hopefully loving it too). As it happens, I did love it. But it certainly wasn't what I was expecting.

    I love the Pearl Thief for the innate Scottishness that infuses every page. I love it for the vibrancy of the characters, who all leap off the page: Ellen, Euan, Jamie, Pinkie (omg my heart), especially Julie, and even the secondary characters like Mary Kinnaird and Sandy and Frank Dunbar. I love it for the mystery and the history and the inclusion of the Tinkers, who were people I'd never even known existed prior to picking this up. And I loved it for teaching me more about the world, as historical fiction seems to do time and time again. I knew nothing about Scottish river pearls, but this book changed that.

    With it being a prequel, Elizabeth Wein leaves a few Easter eggs here and there to show us where certain things from Code Name Verity came from (ahem, Queenie). But it works just as well on its own, I think. I had less than a hundred pages to finish last night and felt like I was freaking out on every other page because the story was that intense. And while the ending wrapped up quickly, it wasn't what I would call neat -- I'm still sad about the pearls.

  • Dianne

    She was coming home, not for a visit, but to help liquidate her deceased grandfather’s estate. The debt collectors were at the door and the house was to become a school. Fifteen-year-old Julia must be part of the dismantling of lifetimes of accumulated family treasures and heirlooms, but an attack by a shadowy figure leaves her comatose, awaking a victim of amnesia. She is only alive because of two young Travelers.

    When things go missing, the Travelers are accused and now it is up to Julia, her

    She was coming home, not for a visit, but to help liquidate her deceased grandfather’s estate. The debt collectors were at the door and the house was to become a school. Fifteen-year-old Julia must be part of the dismantling of lifetimes of accumulated family treasures and heirlooms, but an attack by a shadowy figure leaves her comatose, awaking a victim of amnesia. She is only alive because of two young Travelers.

    When things go missing, the Travelers are accused and now it is up to Julia, her brother and the Traveler siblings to uncover the mystery that shrouds their lives. Enter the world of Britain in the 1930’s when prejudice, wealth and power determine the worth or veracity of a person and watch Julia grow as a person and come of age as a young lady as her eyes are opened to the worst and best in humanity.

    by Elizabeth Wein is a rich historical tale that precedes her

    tale. Exquisite details, and lyrical prose invites the reader to sit back and travel to a time long ago, feel the atmosphere of the times and witness the determination of four young people against all odds on a mission to discover the truth.

    I received an ARC edition from the Disney Book Group in exchange for my honest and voluntary review.

    Publisher: Disney Hyperion (May 2, 2017)

    Publication Date: May 2, 2017

    Genre: YA Historical Fiction

    Print Length: 336 pages

    Available from:

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  • - ̗̀ mymy  ̖́-

    out of the 3 books in code name verity, this one is definitely my favourite. i just had such a wonderful time devouring this!! this made me care for julie more. now that i've read

    i realize how much more colourful julie's life was with maddie (in

    ). i enjoyed this a lot! all the characters were so delightful and real and loveable. i loved this so much, it was so close to a 5 stars read for me, if only it had been a little longer.


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