This Is Just My Face: Try Not to Stare by Gabourey Sidibe

This Is Just My Face: Try Not to Stare

Gabourey Sidibe—“Gabby” to her legion of fans—skyrocketed to international fame in 2009 when she played the leading role in Lee Daniels acclaimed movie Precious. In This is Just My Face, she shares a one-of-a-kind life story. Sidibe paints her Bed-Stuy/Harlem family life with a polygamous father and a gifted mother who supports her two children by singing in the subway. Si...

Title:This Is Just My Face: Try Not to Stare
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:0544786769
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:246 pages

This Is Just My Face: Try Not to Stare Reviews

  • Emir Ibañez
    Dec 08, 2016

    God I'm so looking forward to read this, I can't wait!

  • Roxane
    Jan 05, 2017

    Gabourey Sidibe’s delightful memoir This Is Just My Face: Try Not To Stare offers a memorable look into what happens when a black girl’s dreams come true, from the inside out. From her unique childhood as the daughter of a subway singer mother and polygamous father to struggling with depression to getting the role of Precious, Sidibe is fearless, incredibly funny and gorgeously open. What she offers of herself in these pages is a gift.

    Also, major side eye to lee daniels. And andre leon talley.

  • Valerie
    May 19, 2017

    Reading Gabourey Sidibe's funny, introspective, and healing reflections on her life was a pleasure. On top of reaffirming how much I adore the memoir/autobiography genre (I've been reading a lot more fiction lately to open my perspective), I learned so much about this talented young woman. Reading through her low points, triumphs, and everything in between kept me captivated from cover to cover, shown in the speed with which I paged through it. As reflected in the

    Reading Gabourey Sidibe's funny, introspective, and healing reflections on her life was a pleasure. On top of reaffirming how much I adore the memoir/autobiography genre (I've been reading a lot more fiction lately to open my perspective), I learned so much about this talented young woman. Reading through her low points, triumphs, and everything in between kept me captivated from cover to cover, shown in the speed with which I paged through it. As reflected in the

    , it's so incredibly clear that this story was written by the woman we're learning about, a fact that isn't always apparent in books "written" by celebrities. I most appreciated how the sharing of her story was something that was as much for her as it was for us. It made the whole reading experience that much more enriching.

    What I loved most about this was how so much of her life reminded me of my own while still being so different. Sidibe does a fantastic job of telling her story while also making it relatable for the reader.

    As you can tell from this lengthy review, this introspective look at her life has made me grow to love Gabourey Sidibe in a new and beautiful way. I'd heard her name before and always enjoyed her work when I encountered it, but much like it's been with other memoirs and biographies, now I'm more invested in the woman behind those roles. I look forward to seeing her growth as an actress, director, and a person over the years. Great book, would absolutely recommend!

  • Melissa
    Jun 15, 2017

    Sassy and serious! Sexism, eating disorders, phone sex workers, anxiety/depression, hair issues, psychics, twitter craziness, your dad's big secret...these are just some of the subjects that make an appearance, Gabourey discusses both the high and low moments in her life with raw honesty and a sassy wit that left me going 'No way' and then LOLing page after page.

  • Janine
    May 29, 2017

    I enjoyed this book, and in a way that felt different than other celebrity autobiographies I have read.

    For one, I felt like Sidibe is a lot different in real life than I expected...and also kind of not? Like, there were things she said and I would be like "oh man, that is SO me, YES!" and feel like I related to her so well. But overall, I can't say my life has been

    like hers. Which I think made this such a fascinating read.

    Another thing that set her book apart from others is that it's

    I enjoyed this book, and in a way that felt different than other celebrity autobiographies I have read.

    For one, I felt like Sidibe is a lot different in real life than I expected...and also kind of not? Like, there were things she said and I would be like "oh man, that is SO me, YES!" and feel like I related to her so well. But overall, I can't say my life has been

    like hers. Which I think made this such a fascinating read.

    Another thing that set her book apart from others is that it's really about HER. Not her rise to fame or her experience getting her big break as Precious, but about GABBY. Her life, her family, her parents, her struggles. I think the fact that fame came to her much later than it does for other celebrities (and when I say that, I mean in her 20s...Hollywood is clearly still a young person's game) was part of the reason for this. That, and the fact that she never really saw acting or performing as a calling for herself. That made it even more interesting to hear about how

    came about, and launched her career.

    I appreciated her message of empowerment and loving yourself, while also being honest about her own vulnerability and insecurities. I cannot imagine how it feels to put yourself out there in the way that celebrities do, especially when it's NOT something you sought after and expected.

    I also found her discussion of her becoming famous and having money really interesting. You hear stories about celebrities saying that they always said when they got famous, they'd buy their parents a house or something like that. And I'm sure many of them do buy things for their families. Sidibe's discussion of the way her family and friends

    things from her, though, shed a new light on that idea. It wasn't just that she

    do those things for people, it was that they expected her to do them, and if she was reluctant or said she couldn't help, she was viewed as the selfish celebrity. Nevermind the fact that she didn't have nearly as much money as everyone thought she did. It was interesting to hear her talk about that experience.

    I really enjoyed this book, and found Sidibe to be incredibly honest and funny. She came off as very relatable, and a true introvert at heart. She also won me over when she talked about her 'N Sync fanfiction writing, because I'd be lying if I said I don't have my own embarrassing fanfic stories hidden somewhere too (not 'N Sync, but does that really even matter?). This was fun, and it made me fall in love with Sidibe even more.

    Also? I really do need to watch

    one of these days...

  • Ebony Rose
    Jun 07, 2017

    One of my reading goals this year was to read more nonfiction and poetry. And for some reason, reading memoirs is how that goal has manifested. This is interesting because for the longest time I have vocally declared my disdain of all things memoir/autobiography. It turns out I was wrong. I was just reading the memoirs of the

    . I was reading stories of the great heroes of our time, people I could barely relate to. Big mistake. Those people are important and so are their stories, bu

    One of my reading goals this year was to read more nonfiction and poetry. And for some reason, reading memoirs is how that goal has manifested. This is interesting because for the longest time I have vocally declared my disdain of all things memoir/autobiography. It turns out I was wrong. I was just reading the memoirs of the

    . I was reading stories of the great heroes of our time, people I could barely relate to. Big mistake. Those people are important and so are their stories, but they don't capture my attention from a literary standpoint.

    Gabourey Sidibe and I don't have a lot in common at a surface level (for starters, I'm not famous or artistically inclined and I grew up in Canada, lol). But her story is not so different from mine once you delve beyond those obvious things. Her memoir deals with her journey to fame, but also deals with her insecurities, being a plus-sized black woman in a world that has yet to realize our worth, hair struggles, family dysfunction and love, dating woes (OH the dating WOES!!!), and much more.

    I read this book after seeing Gabourey at a book signing and listening to her speak. Who she is in person is exactly who she is on paper. The memoir feels honest, raw, and is intense in some moments. But it is also laugh-out-loud-on-the-subway funny, relatable and comforting. I intend to listen to the audiobook next, as there is something special about hearing people tell their own stories in their own voices.

    I would recommend this book without any hesitation. It's worth a read and you won't regret it, I promise!

  • Jessica Woodbury
    Jun 24, 2017

    I usually do not read a whole lot of celebrity memoir-slash-essay books if the celebrity is not a writer or comedian whose work I'm familiar with. But I was so charmed by the cover and title of Gabourey Sidibe's book, and knowing a little of her backstory I thought it might be a fun read. I was very much right.

    This is the kind of book you read where when it's over you feel like you and the author are now friends. Sidibe does this thing where her writing feels so conversational, so natural, that

    I usually do not read a whole lot of celebrity memoir-slash-essay books if the celebrity is not a writer or comedian whose work I'm familiar with. But I was so charmed by the cover and title of Gabourey Sidibe's book, and knowing a little of her backstory I thought it might be a fun read. I was very much right.

    This is the kind of book you read where when it's over you feel like you and the author are now friends. Sidibe does this thing where her writing feels so conversational, so natural, that it made me want to figure out how to do that. She is also ridiculously funny, I laughed (out loud!) so many times. It is the kind of book where you want to have someone sitting next to you to read a funny line to.

    While she plays up for laughs a lot, Sidibe also doesn't shy away from the hard stuff. She's able to talk about being a phone sex operator and having a famous subway singer for a mom, and she can turn on a dime to talk about struggles with money and her parents' tumultuous marriage and divorce.

    Sidibe is just so open, so freely and frankly herself. She writes a lot about how she wants to have the kind of deep confidence her mother has and if she doesn't have it already she's well on her way. This is a fun read that you can easily pick up for five minutes or an hour.

  • Kelly
    Jun 30, 2017

    A funny, punchy read that will appeal to those readers who love Mindy Kaling's memoirs. Gabby's voice is fabulous and her storytelling is engaging. Loved her talk about working on a sex line as a talker, as well as her final chapter on NSYNC fan fiction. I found her body talk, especially the chapter on her weight loss surgery, to be really empowering and positive.

    As the kids say, it's pretty #relatable. You can't help but want to hang out with her.

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