Papi: My Story by David Ortiz

Papi: My Story

An entertaining, unfiltered memoir by one of the game’s greatest, most clutch sluggers and beloved personalities David “Big Papi” Ortiz is a baseball icon and one of the most popular figures ever to play the game.  As a key part of the Boston Red Sox for 14 years, David has helped the team win 3 World Series, bringing back a storied franchise from “never wins” to “always w...

Title:Papi: My Story
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:0544814614
Edition Language:English
Number of Pages:272 pages

Papi: My Story Reviews

  • Jen

    I relived a lot of amazing moments reading this book. And he sure didn't hold back in expressing how he feels about certain people. Ortiz is such an important part of Red Sox history and certainly left an impression on the city of Boston. I enjoyed recounting his impressive career.

  • Steven Belanger

    Very disappointing book, more notable for the stuff he leaves out than for what he puts in. This is mostly a gripe session, with a surprising number of motherf---er bombs, considering his younger fanbase. If you want to read about what a motherf---er former Sox GM Theo Epstein was while they talked contracts, and about how much of a motherf---er Twins manager Tom Kelly was all the time, and about how much confidence he has in himself, which is necessary because everyone will disrespect you and y

    Very disappointing book, more notable for the stuff he leaves out than for what he puts in. This is mostly a gripe session, with a surprising number of motherf---er bombs, considering his younger fanbase. If you want to read about what a motherf---er former Sox GM Theo Epstein was while they talked contracts, and about how much of a motherf---er Twins manager Tom Kelly was all the time, and about how much confidence he has in himself, which is necessary because everyone will disrespect you and you have to defend yourself and tell them who you really are, then this book is for you. He even takes a few stabs at Terry Francona, who he never respected again after Tito pinch-hit for him in Toronto three or four years ago. Yet wasn't he hitting about .220 at the time?

    But I'd been hoping instead for a bit more about 2004, about the postseason. Those were covered in a few short pages. Or about 2007, and Curt Schilling's bloody sock, or something about J.D. Drew or Josh Beckett or, hell, anything at all about any of the more important games that year? Maybe something about Youkilis, who nobody remembers anymore. How about how Colorado finished the season 22-1 and then got swept in the World Series? Nope. Maybe 2013? How about some stories about Jonny Gomes, or Napoli, or anyone else? What about that ALCS against the Tigers, when Ortiz hit the season's most important homerun, before Napoli hit his against Verlander in that 1-0 game? How about how the Sox hit maybe the Mendoza line combined for the series, yet won it in 6 games? How about anything at all about Uehara? Maybe the World Series, which had a game that ended with a runner picked off third and was followed by a game that ended with a runner picked off first. Nope. Maybe a paragraph apiece, and nothing at all about any of the specific ALCS or World Series games. Not even anything about his World Series game-winning hits, except that he hit them, and who he hit them off. No commentary; no in-depth analysis, nothing. He proves he had a helluva memory for who threw what to him months ago, which he'd then look for months later, but that's it.

    You get a really short chapter about what a butthole Bobby Valentine was, which I already knew, and I detested him then and now and for that whole year. Valentine was a baseball version of Trump, and it's no surprise to me at all that they're actually friends--if either guy can be said to have a friend, as opposed to a mutual, leech-like attraction. But there's nothing new here at all. The few things that may be news to some, like how his marriage almost fell apart, is never given specifics. I'm not expecting The Inquirer here, but give me something. Didn't get it.

    I'm telling you, this book is at least 75% about how he was disrespected by contracts and PED accusations. He never mentions HGH, of course, and he never gave honest accolades to people he trashed, like Francona and Epstein. It all comes across as very bitter grapes from someone you might think doesn't have much to be bitter about. He has a few decent points that non-Sox fans may not know, like how the Sox underpays its stars (Pedroia notoriously got a home-discount contract that this book never mentions; Pedroia is more underpaid now than Ortiz ever was, dollar for dollar) and yet overpays its free agent signings--like Pablo Sandoval and Hanley Ramirez. And Carl Crawford. And Julio Lugo. And Edgar Renteria. And Rusney Castillo. You knew this already as a fan, but the sheer number of examples is staggering. Yet even this is harped on again and again, its repetition taking up space you wanted reserved for funny or interesting anecdotes about some players. Hell, how about Orsillo, or Remy, or Castig? How about how he was able to have the single-best last season of any hitter in history? How about any stories at all about fans he's spoken to over the years, especially in 2013?

    Nope. You get a chapter about his charity, but nothing about other players' charities. Very disappointing. Ortiz was one of my favorite players, and still is, but as a baseball memoirist, he swings and misses. This book is truly a money-making grab off his retirement. Even non-Sox fans won't learn anything new here, which is a mystery because it's clearly written for a common Sox fan. And believe me, I'm no baseball prude, but the loud volume of motherf---ers and other punches and jibes is shocking, considering he has to know that kids and pre-teens will want to read this. But, Dads out there, beware: They probably shouldn't. Also shocking because it's otherwise such a light read, you'd think it was meant for a light (ie--young and/or new) fan. The diatribes and whining don't make it any less light, so it's essentially a fluff piece with a lot of whining, swears and overall negativity.

    Shockingly disappointing.

  • Toby Richard

    I really enjoyed this book. It gave me a chance to relive many great moments for the Red Sox and Ortiz. The team misses him.

  • Bookish

    David Ortiz, one of the best players the Red Sox have ever seen, is writing about his career in this memoir. He starts when he is a child and living in the Dominican Republic and continues on through his time with the Red Sox. It’s a well written and emotional book. Ortiz gives an inside view of the Red Sox organization, which he spent 13 years with, and it isn’t always favorable. He also relates stories about Pedro Martinez and Manny Ramirez, his teammates from the early Red Sox years. Big Papi

    David Ortiz, one of the best players the Red Sox have ever seen, is writing about his career in this memoir. He starts when he is a child and living in the Dominican Republic and continues on through his time with the Red Sox. It’s a well written and emotional book. Ortiz gives an inside view of the Red Sox organization, which he spent 13 years with, and it isn’t always favorable. He also relates stories about Pedro Martinez and Manny Ramirez, his teammates from the early Red Sox years. Big Papi is a larger than life character, and this is a great book to read if you follow the Red Sox and want to know more about the career of one of the team’s best players. —Barb (

    )

  • Fay

    I preface this by admitting to being a life long Red Sox fan. For 13 years I've watched David Ortiz dazzle Boston fans with his timely hitting. His retirement last year at age 40 was well deserved, but a blow to Sox fans and their line-up. As soon as I read of the publication of this book, I dashed to the store to buy it. It was a good read and showed a side to Papi that I suspected might be there but was not on view during the games. We knew that he had a difficult childhood in the Dominican Re

    I preface this by admitting to being a life long Red Sox fan. For 13 years I've watched David Ortiz dazzle Boston fans with his timely hitting. His retirement last year at age 40 was well deserved, but a blow to Sox fans and their line-up. As soon as I read of the publication of this book, I dashed to the store to buy it. It was a good read and showed a side to Papi that I suspected might be there but was not on view during the games. We knew that he had a difficult childhood in the Dominican Republic but it served to build the character that was in him and led him through life. I enjoyed reading of his relationship with other players, how influential they were to him and how he played the same role for other more recent players. I also really enjoyed knowing that his family plays a core role in his life, both from his parents on to his wife and children. He still has a role to play in the community of Boston and in the Dominican and I look forward to following his life as he does so.

  • Rick

    I went into this book with high expectations but found them to be unfulfilled. I was hoping for a new insight into one of the most exciting periods in Boston Red Sox history. Instead we're given the type of thin stories that haven't already been told. There are no really new or even interesting stories to be told. Unlike Pedro's story, Ortiz doesn't offer us that insiders view of the team and clubhouse. Pedro shared some gossip without breaking the clubhouse rule of Ometra. Papi gives us a quick

    I went into this book with high expectations but found them to be unfulfilled. I was hoping for a new insight into one of the most exciting periods in Boston Red Sox history. Instead we're given the type of thin stories that haven't already been told. There are no really new or even interesting stories to be told. Unlike Pedro's story, Ortiz doesn't offer us that insiders view of the team and clubhouse. Pedro shared some gossip without breaking the clubhouse rule of Ometra. Papi gives us a quick fast and done view of his life. He also is carrying a lot of bitterness which he doesn't really go into. I never knew about his beef with Tito but one would think Ortiz can hold a grudge with the best of them. None of the smiling, funny Papi is seen here. Lastly, why is Michael Holly's name even associated with this? It doesn't seem he had anything really to do with it because he's a much better writer then what''s put out here.

    Not one of the best Red Sox books written.

  • Michelle O'Connell

    thanks for an awesome career!

  • Sharon

    From impoverished and violent beginnings in the Dominican Republic, "Big Papi" David Ortiz rose to the pinnacle of Major League Baseball. He credits many for their help along the way: his loving parents, friends and fellow baseball players, coaches, managers, and owners who provided the support and the guidance he needed. With successes came failures, but Ortiz has always seemed to take it all in stride and to learn from his mistakes.

    As a lifelong Red Sox fan, there were few surprises in this bo

    From impoverished and violent beginnings in the Dominican Republic, "Big Papi" David Ortiz rose to the pinnacle of Major League Baseball. He credits many for their help along the way: his loving parents, friends and fellow baseball players, coaches, managers, and owners who provided the support and the guidance he needed. With successes came failures, but Ortiz has always seemed to take it all in stride and to learn from his mistakes.

    As a lifelong Red Sox fan, there were few surprises in this book for me, but I enjoyed reading it nevertheless. My favorite part of Papi: My Story was the origin story of the nickname "Big Papi", as it was one I had not heard before. It was great to reminisce with one of my favorite players of the game, especially through the two sections of photographs that provided a perfect accompaniment to the book.

    Whether you are a Red Sox fan or just have respect for the game of baseball, there is no denying that David Ortiz will go down in history as one of its best players. I would recommend Papi: My Story to readers who enjoy sports biographies.

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