Papi: My Story by David Ortiz

Papi: My Story

An entertaining, unfiltered memoir by one of the game’s greatest, most clutch sluggers and beloved personalities David “Big Papi” Ortiz is a baseball icon and one of the most popular figures ever to play the game.  As a key part of the Boston Red Sox for 14 years, David has helped the team win 3 World Series, bringing back a storied franchise from “never wins” to “always w...

Title:Papi: My Story
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:0544814614
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:272 pages

Papi: My Story Reviews

  • Altan
    Jun 14, 2017

    Nice and easy read. There were a few nuggets of information that I had not previously known such as David Ortiz sitting on Joaquín Benoit's changeup in the 2013 ALCS because he had struck out swinging earlier in the season due to it. But if you're a big Red Sox fan who already knows the overall career arc of David Ortiz, this book won't blow you away.

  • Ken
    May 20, 2017

    We all know the player David Ortiz. He's great no question I was amazed to learn about the man, his dedication to his teammates, the fans, and the city of Boston. I've been a fan of the Red Sox my whole life but I've always appreciated great players regardless of the teams they played for "big papi" is one of those greats. The book is a excellent insight to what Ortiz went through as a player and man

  • Mike
    May 21, 2017

    Whether or not you're a Red Sox fan like I am, you have to recognize that David "Big Papi" Ortiz put together a career body of work and pure heart that made him one of the most iconic ballplayers of his era. This memoir is filled with bombs; f-bombs, homers, and pure honesty, from a player who left his mark on the game and who left at the top of his game for his position. I am proud and inspired to be his fan, and I loved reading this book.

  • Jen
    Jun 04, 2017

    I relived a lot of amazing moments reading this book. And he sure didn't hold back in expressing how he feels about certain people. Ortiz is such an important part of Red Sox history and certainly left an impression on the city of Boston. I enjoyed recounting his impressive career.

  • Jonathan Tennis
    Jun 03, 2017

    It's a solid 5 for the story and performance of a player like Big Papi, a 1 for the writing. I'm a fan of baseball and for everything David Ortiz embodied playing the game. It's much of the reason I struggled through this book though the writing was lackluster, I just wish he'd gotten a better writer to work with on this book. Still worth the read.

  • Joey Barron
    Jun 12, 2017

    A fun and honest read. Ortiz's words and respect for Theo Epstein and choice words for Dan Shaughnessy were probably the most revealing.

    The Patriots' last second win coinciding with Papi's grand slam in Game 2 ALCS 2008 is an interesting connection.

    Kudos for having an index section at the end.

  • Jamie Coutu
    Jun 22, 2017

    As soon as I heard about the release date for this book, I pre-ordered it. Papi had just retired and I was in denial/withdrawal. As a fan, I wanted just a little bit more. I held off on reading the book until the date for his jersey number retirement ceremony was near. That time has finally come.

    He made me laugh. He made me teary. He made me remember some of the best (and some of the worst) memories as a devout Red Sox fan; and I learned some things.

    It's a book about his career, so sure, there

    As soon as I heard about the release date for this book, I pre-ordered it. Papi had just retired and I was in denial/withdrawal. As a fan, I wanted just a little bit more. I held off on reading the book until the date for his jersey number retirement ceremony was near. That time has finally come.

    He made me laugh. He made me teary. He made me remember some of the best (and some of the worst) memories as a devout Red Sox fan; and I learned some things.

    It's a book about his career, so sure, there are stats and numbers and whatnot, but it wasn't overwhelming. He talked about the PEOPLE he surrounded himself with. There were many names I remembered fondly, others not so much. Overall, the book reminded me of how much he loves the game of baseball. There will never be another David Ortiz and I am incredibly grateful that I was able to witness his career, and be reminded of many memorable moments through his book.

  • Steven Belanger
    Jun 24, 2017

    Very disappointing book, more notable for the stuff he leaves out than for what he puts in. This is mostly a gripe session, with a surprising number of motherf---er bombs, considering his younger fanbase. If you want to read about what a motherf---er former Sox GM Theo Epstein was while they talked contracts, and about how much of a motherf---er Twins manager Tom Kelly was all the time, and about how much confidence he has in himself, which is necessary because everyone will disrespect you and y

    Very disappointing book, more notable for the stuff he leaves out than for what he puts in. This is mostly a gripe session, with a surprising number of motherf---er bombs, considering his younger fanbase. If you want to read about what a motherf---er former Sox GM Theo Epstein was while they talked contracts, and about how much of a motherf---er Twins manager Tom Kelly was all the time, and about how much confidence he has in himself, which is necessary because everyone will disrespect you and you have to defend yourself and tell them who you really are, then this book is for you. He even takes a few stabs at Terry Francona, who he never respected again after Tito pinch-hit for him in Toronto three or four years ago. Yet wasn't he hitting about .220 at the time?

    But I'd been hoping instead for a bit more about 2004, about the postseason. Those were covered in a few short pages. Or about 2007, and Curt Schilling's bloody sock, or something about J.D. Drew or Josh Beckett or, hell, anything at all about any of the more important games that year? Maybe something about Youkilis, who nobody remembers anymore. How about how Colorado finished the season 22-1 and then got swept in the World Series? Nope. Maybe 2013? How about some stories about Jonny Gomes, or Napoli, or anyone else? What about that ALCS against the Tigers, when Ortiz hit the season's most important homerun, before Napoli hit his against Verlander in that 1-0 game? How about how the Sox hit maybe the Mendoza line combined for the series, yet won it in 6 games? How about anything at all about Uehara? Maybe the World Series, which had a game that ended with a runner picked off third and was followed by a game that ended with a runner picked off first. Nope. Maybe a paragraph apiece, and nothing at all about any of the specific ALCS or World Series games. Not even anything about his World Series game-winning hits, except that he hit them, and who he hit them off. No commentary; no in-depth analysis, nothing. He proves he had a helluva memory for who threw what to him months ago, which he'd then look for months later, but that's it.

    You get a really short chapter about what a butthole Bobby Valentine was, which I already knew, and I detested him then and now and for that whole year. Valentine was a baseball version of Trump, and it's no surprise to me at all that they're actually friends--if either guy can be said to have a friend, as opposed to a mutual, leech-like attraction. But there's nothing new here at all. The few things that may be news to some, like how his marriage almost fell apart, is never given specifics. I'm not expecting The Inquirer here, but give me something. Didn't get it.

    I'm telling you, this book is at least 75% about how he was disrespected by contracts and PED accusations. He never mentions HGH, of course, and he never gave honest accolades to people he trashed, like Francona and Epstein. It all comes across as very bitter grapes from someone you might think doesn't have much to be bitter about. He has a few decent points that non-Sox fans may not know, like how the Sox underpays its stars (Pedroia notoriously got a home-discount contract that this book never mentions; Pedroia is more underpaid now than Ortiz ever was, dollar for dollar) and yet overpays its free agent signings--like Pablo Sandoval and Hanley Ramirez. And Carl Crawford. And Julio Lugo. And Edgar Renteria. And Rusney Castillo. You knew this already as a fan, but the sheer number of examples is staggering. Yet even this is harped on again and again, its repetition taking up space you wanted reserved for funny or interesting anecdotes about some players. Hell, how about Orsillo, or Remy, or Castig? How about how he was able to have the single-best last season of any hitter in history? How about any stories at all about fans he's spoken to over the years, especially in 2013?

    Nope. You get a chapter about his charity, but nothing about other players' charities. Very disappointing. Ortiz was one of my favorite players, and still is, but as a baseball memoirist, he swings and misses. This book is truly a money-making grab off his retirement. Even non-Sox fans won't learn anything new here, which is a mystery because it's clearly written for a common Sox fan. And believe me, I'm no baseball prude, but the loud volume of motherf---ers and other punches and jibes is shocking, considering he has to know that kids and pre-teens will want to read this. But, Dads out there, beware: They probably shouldn't. Also shocking because it's otherwise such a light read, you'd think it was meant for a light (ie--young and/or new) fan. The diatribes and whining don't make it any less light, so it's essentially a fluff piece with a lot of whining, swears and overall negativity.

    Shockingly disappointing.

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