The Great Treehouse War by Lisa Graff

The Great Treehouse War

Kids vs. parents! An epic treehouse sleepover! An awesome group of friends! An exciting new book from National Book Award finalist Lisa Graff.Winnie's last day of fourth grade ended with a pretty life-changing surprise. That was the day Winnie s parents got divorced, the day they decided that Winnie would live three days a week with each of them and spend Wednesdays by her...

Title:The Great Treehouse War
Author:
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Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:304 pages

The Great Treehouse War Reviews

  • Diane
    Jun 22, 2017

    "You can bring your grades up on your mother's day."

    Winnie's parents do not get along. They argue about every conceivable topic, including who has one more awards. In fact, they are so determined never to see or speak to each other that they have set up what they feel is the perfect schedule. Winnie will stay at her mom's house on Tuesdays, Fridays and Sundays. She will be at her dad's house on Monday, Thursday and Saturdays. And so that everything is perfectly even, Winnie will spend Wednesdays

    "You can bring your grades up on your mother's day."

    Winnie's parents do not get along. They argue about every conceivable topic, including who has one more awards. In fact, they are so determined never to see or speak to each other that they have set up what they feel is the perfect schedule. Winnie will stay at her mom's house on Tuesdays, Fridays and Sundays. She will be at her dad's house on Monday, Thursday and Saturdays. And so that everything is perfectly even, Winnie will spend Wednesdays in a tree house that was designed by Uncle Huck. It is exactly in the middle between her mother's and father's houses and has all the creature comforts, including a zip line to her uncle's house.

    At first, things seem to work fairly smoothly with this arrangement. But when Winnie's mother discovers that she won't be able to have Thanksgiving with Winnie, she decides to pick another holiday to celebrate in great elaboration. She chooses Flag Day. Not to be outdone, her father decides to celebrate World UFO day to great extreme. Suddenly, every day is another celebration: Ice Cream Sandwich Day, Underwear Day and Bad Poetry Day. It's getting so that Winnie can't even get any homework done because she is constantly celebrating some ridiculous holiday. But when her teacher, Mr. Benetto, tells her she's in danger of flunking fifth grade, she knows something has to change. But her parents just won't listen to her.

    That's when some interesting information falls into her hands. According to a plaque on the tree, it was actually planted by The Republic of Fittizio, a now defunct country. And the three is actually the former site of Fittizio's consulate. Therefore, technically, when she's in the treehouse, she's not in the United States. And therefore, the laws of the US do not apply. So, she tells her parents "if you guys want me to come down, you have to come up here together, both of you, at the same time, and talk to me." And, because her parents can't act in a responsible and mature manner, Winnie is in for a long haul up in that tree.

    But things really get out of hand when nine of her friends decide to join her. They have specific grievances against their parents, too. That's when the media finds out about it and the police are called. Except that the police have the obligation to keep people out of Fittizio rather than making the kids come out of the treehouse. At first, the kids are having a grand old time ... it feels like that great sleepover ever. But as the days wear on without any concessions made, the kids start to argue. How can this situation possibly be resolved so that both sides are happy?

    Students will enjoy this farcical story about a group of kids who are trying to gain a little more independence and consideration. The different formats, including sticky note comments, television news transcripts and other forms of communication make for a fun change of pace during the story. But at the heart of it all, the simple message ... listen to your kids ... respect our feelings will resonate with middle grade readers.

  • Jen Petro-Roy
    Jun 02, 2017

    3.5 stars. A cute, fun read that kids will love.

  • Mary Lee
    Mar 05, 2017

    I'm tagging this cats because Winnie's Buttons is truly "the world's greatest cat." I'm tagging this coming-of-age because it is a rare middle grade (not middle school) book that explores the end-of-5th-grade-going-to-middle-school phase, rather than being about 12 year-olds who already are in middle school. I'm tagging this empathy because that is Winnie's super power (she calls it artist's vision) and what helps her to solve the problem that the epic sleepover turns into. I'm tagging this hybr

    I'm tagging this cats because Winnie's Buttons is truly "the world's greatest cat." I'm tagging this coming-of-age because it is a rare middle grade (not middle school) book that explores the end-of-5th-grade-going-to-middle-school phase, rather than being about 12 year-olds who already are in middle school. I'm tagging this empathy because that is Winnie's super power (she calls it artist's vision) and what helps her to solve the problem that the epic sleepover turns into. I'm tagging this hybrid because there are fun sketches, maps, and sticky note comments from Winnie's friends. I'm tagging this memoir because that's what the character is writing.

  • Gerard Villegas
    Apr 16, 2017

    A cute story concerning a protagonist who tries to protest her "caught in the middle" role in the bitter custody fight between her divorced, bickering parents. The Great Treehouse War teaches children the significance of activism in a very small context but children will be enthralled by a story of a brave girl who stands up to adults. Furthermore, the fact that the main character is hinted to be of another cultural background really throws in something different in the mix. Plus, young readers

    A cute story concerning a protagonist who tries to protest her "caught in the middle" role in the bitter custody fight between her divorced, bickering parents. The Great Treehouse War teaches children the significance of activism in a very small context but children will be enthralled by a story of a brave girl who stands up to adults. Furthermore, the fact that the main character is hinted to be of another cultural background really throws in something different in the mix. Plus, young readers will appreciate the fact that the book uses post-it notes, newspaper clippings, and even letters to make the story even more relatable. A wonderful read that you should pick up.

  • Stephanie (Reading is Better With Cupcakes)
    May 15, 2017

    First things first, let me just say that The Great Treehouse War was a lot of fun to read. I started reading it and before I knew it I was near the ending. Despite being way over the intended age group for this book, I still found myself able to read and appreciate it a lot.

    The Great Treehouse War is about a young girl named Winnie. Winnie is your normal 10ish year old girl (she is in the fifth grade). She has friends, likes art, and has the worlds most amazing cat. She also has parents that dec

    First things first, let me just say that The Great Treehouse War was a lot of fun to read. I started reading it and before I knew it I was near the ending. Despite being way over the intended age group for this book, I still found myself able to read and appreciate it a lot.

    The Great Treehouse War is about a young girl named Winnie. Winnie is your normal 10ish year old girl (she is in the fifth grade). She has friends, likes art, and has the worlds most amazing cat. She also has parents that decided that they were better off no longer married to each other.

    When Winnie's parents decided to divorce, they split everything up so it would be equal for both of them. One parent had Winnie 3 days of the week and the other had her for the other 3 days. This only equals up to 6 days, however, they couldn't let one parent have 4 days and the other only get 3, so they came up with a plan. Between the two properties (they had found a place that they could live there was a treehouse. So for that odd day of the week, which happened to be Wednesdays, Winnie would be in the treehouse, not with either parent.

    That way everything would remain totally equal and fair.

    Of course, that was too hard for the parents. They started celebrated all the crazy holidays that happen. They each kept trying to one up the other. This was causing Winnie to fail the fifth grade. But neither parent was listening. As long as everything was fair that was all that mattered.

    A lot of things went on that ended up with Winnie in the treehouse with her friends...and the great treehouse war began.

    See? It really is quite the book!

    Throughout the book there are tons of illustrations and little side notes from her classmates about the things that happened in the story. Each kid has their own little quirk, and the quirks pop up over and over again. It lightens up the seriousness of the book and makes it a lot more fun to read. At first I thought they took away a little bit from the story, but once I got used to them I enjoyed them.

    Also, as you can tell, there is a serious note to this book. I am an adult, not a kid in the age range that this book is intended for....so to me it was quite obvious. The way the parents were behaving was really affecting Winnie. How this translates to a kid with the way this story was written? I am not 100% sure. Maybe they will relate to Winnie, maybe they wont. I can't tell you. Did I think it was fun? Yes. Do I think Winnie should have had to go to such an extreme measure to try to get her parents to listen to her? No. But this story wasn't meant for me - the adult. It was meant for the kids.

    And I will definitely let a kid read this book. I think they will enjoy it and I hope that if they find themselves in a similar situation, that they will find a character that they can relate to. And that they can find some help from this book on how to speak up and be heard if they need to be.

    This review is based on a copy provided by the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review. All thoughts and opinions are mine and mine alone.

    Find more of my reviews here:

  • Aeicha
    May 22, 2017

    Winnie’s divorced and constantly arguing parents are obsessed with making sure Winnie spends equal amounts of time with each of them...which is why they decide that Winnie will spend three days a week with each parent and spend Wednesdays by herself in a treehouse located directly between their houses. Winnie loves her treehouse Wednesdays, especially since her parents are currently trying to outdo each other by celebrating wacky and weird holidays, which has caused Winnie to fall way behind on

    Winnie’s divorced and constantly arguing parents are obsessed with making sure Winnie spends equal amounts of time with each of them...which is why they decide that Winnie will spend three days a week with each parent and spend Wednesdays by herself in a treehouse located directly between their houses. Winnie loves her treehouse Wednesdays, especially since her parents are currently trying to outdo each other by celebrating wacky and weird holidays, which has caused Winnie to fall way behind on her fifth grade education. But when Winnie’s friends decide that they’re tired of their own parents unfair treatments, the ten kids decide to stay in Winnie’ treehouse and NOT come out until their demands are met! Ten kids, one treehouse, and a whole lot of drama...what could go wrong?

    Lisa Graff’s The Great Treehouse War is a witty, heartwarming, and charming middle-grade book. Graff’s signature pitch-perfect storytelling, engaging characters, and honest yet age-appropriate approach to tough subjects, are all present in her newest tale.

    The Great Treehouse War is told from Winnie’s precocious and endearing POV, in a scrapbook type format that tells the story of the Treehouse 10 and their experiences during their almost three week standoff in the treehouse. This creative format will captivate and entertain readers with all the extra notes, drawings, how-to’s, and more, included. Young readers will love the awesomely absurd idea of a child spending one day a week alone in a cool treehouse...and Winnie’s two story treehouse, with its bathroom; art station; zip line; and more, makes for a super fun setting.

    The Treehouse 10’s time in the treehouse is full of laughs, excitement, and relatable conversation. And each of the Treehouse 10 have a unique, diverse personality that adds a great deal to the story and dynamic. I really like the main heroine Winnie and so will young readers.

    And of course, The Great Treehouse War explores subjects like divorce, sibling rivalry, growing up, and more, with a lot of humor, honesty, and heart.

    The Great Treehouse War kept me chuckling and entertained with its wild premise, likable characters, and different format...all things middle-grade readers will highly enjoy!

  • Justine
    Jul 21, 2017

    This book literally had me laughing out loud.

    Winnie is in the 5th grade, and her parents decided to get a divorce. They are very strict on making sure that they both get EXACTLY 50/50 time with Winnie. This should be a good thing right? That her parents want to spend as much time with her as they can? Her parents buy a house that the two backyards join. In the middle of these two backyards is a HUGE tree. Because there is an odd number of days in the week, Winnie's parents decide that 3 days of

    This book literally had me laughing out loud.

    Winnie is in the 5th grade, and her parents decided to get a divorce. They are very strict on making sure that they both get EXACTLY 50/50 time with Winnie. This should be a good thing right? That her parents want to spend as much time with her as they can? Her parents buy a house that the two backyards join. In the middle of these two backyards is a HUGE tree. Because there is an odd number of days in the week, Winnie's parents decide that 3 days of the week she will live with her father and 3 days of the week she will live with her mother. Every Wednesday, Winnie will live in a tree house on the tree that is exactly in between her parents' houses. Her parents have gone crazy about trying to make sure that their time with Winnie is better than their ex-spouse's time with Winnie. They plan these elaborate events every day after school, but Winnie hasn't had enough time to do homework after school now. She is now close to failing 5th grade which means all her friends will go off to middle school without her next year. She has to solve this problem.

    Winnie and her friends decide to lock themselves into the treehouse until their parents agree to their demands (which are hilarious). Some of the demands were to allow them to watch whatever tv shows they want, to have a pet lizard, to keep their tooth collection in a separate room in the house so no one would ruin it, to have their parents play Scrabble with them more. Winnie's one and only demand was for her parents to come up into the treehouse...TOGETHER. That's it.

    There is a huge theme going on with this book. What parents do and how they interact not only with their child but with each other is going to affect their children...immensely. Winnie's parents weren't thinking about Winnie. They were thinking about themselves which is what caused this whole crazy situation.

    I would definitely recommend this book. The audiobook was amazing with all the different narrators. The physical book is also a blast with the fun illustrations, post it notes, news articles, tv broadcasts, etc.

  • Libby Ames
    Jul 21, 2017

    Winifred Malladi-Maraj has had a difficult fifth grade year. Since her parents divorce, Winnie spends half her week with her father and half her week with her mother. Also, just to make sure it is exactly fair, Winnie spends Wednesdays on her own in the treehouse between her parents’ houses. As her parents compete to make their time the most exciting and the best, Winnie lives for Wednesdays when she can do what she wants. When her parents threaten to take her Wednesdays away, Winnie has had eno

    Winifred Malladi-Maraj has had a difficult fifth grade year. Since her parents divorce, Winnie spends half her week with her father and half her week with her mother. Also, just to make sure it is exactly fair, Winnie spends Wednesdays on her own in the treehouse between her parents’ houses. As her parents compete to make their time the most exciting and the best, Winnie lives for Wednesdays when she can do what she wants. When her parents threaten to take her Wednesdays away, Winnie has had enough. She goes into her treehouse and refuses to come down until her parents will talk without fighting and listen to what Winnie has to say. Soon, Winnie is joined by her friends who have their own complaints and demands for their families.

    So begins The Great Treehouse War. The Treehouse Ten make their demands and their parents refuse to comply. After two weeks, life in the treehouse is no longer quite as fun and Winnie begins to see that what we want and what we need might be very different. This lighthearted story illustrates the importance of communication and compromise in all types of relationships. The writing is clever and the book includes great graphics and side notes that give the characters voice and personality. This is a good summer read for middle grade readers or would be a good read aloud.

    Recommended ages--8-12 years

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