The Blue Zones Solution: Eating and Living Like the World's Healthiest People by Dan Buettner

The Blue Zones Solution: Eating and Living Like the World's Healthiest People

In this groundbreaking book, Dan Buettner reveals how to transform your health using smart eating and lifestyle habits gleaned from new research on the diets, eating habits, and lifestyle practices of the communities he's identified as "Blue Zones"—those places with the world's longest-lived, and thus healthiest, people, including locations such as Okinawa, Japan; Sardinia...

Title:The Blue Zones Solution: Eating and Living Like the World's Healthiest People
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:1426211929
Number of Pages:320 pages

The Blue Zones Solution: Eating and Living Like the World's Healthiest People Reviews

  • Carol Wilson

    Very interesting and easy to read but information isn't new to anyone interested in health and nutrition. Did enjoy the various cultures and similarities in healthful eating and living.

  • Emily Crow

    So, my three-star rating comes by way of compromise: for myself, personally, this book was probably of two-star caliber (glad I got it thru inter-library loan); but for someone who has been eating the Standard American Diet (or SAD, i.e., lots of processed foods and fast foods), and living the typical high-stress, low-activity lifestyle, this would probably be a four-star book.

    It seems, these days, that if I look over the healthy cooking and diet shelves, books fall into two broad categories--v

    So, my three-star rating comes by way of compromise: for myself, personally, this book was probably of two-star caliber (glad I got it thru inter-library loan); but for someone who has been eating the Standard American Diet (or SAD, i.e., lots of processed foods and fast foods), and living the typical high-stress, low-activity lifestyle, this would probably be a four-star book.

    It seems, these days, that if I look over the healthy cooking and diet shelves, books fall into two broad categories--vegan and paleo. While not vegan, this one is much closer to that edge of the spectrum (at one point the author admits that he was surprised by how much the Okinawans enjoy pork, as he assumed the healthiest diet would be almost vegan). I have read a lot from both camps, and dabbled in each, and come to the conclusion that...both are right. For example, my favorite authors in both camps would agree on:

    1. Eat mostly whole foods, and avoid processed foods like the plague. Especially all those salty and sugary snacks and sodas.

    2. Get a reasonable amount of exercise. Don't be sedentary and don't overdo it either.

    3. Get a handle on stress, and get enough sleep already!

    4. Make most of your meals at home...eating out is full of perils including inflated portion sizes.

    5. Find your community, which might include church groups, pets or nature.

    So I appreciated this book, in that it definitely encouraged the reader to embark on a whole foods adventure, and mentioned how these long-lived "blue zones" communities included many other lifestyle factors as well. But if you have already read a lot on the topic, there's nothing new here that demands you seek out this book as well.

    I did have a couple of quibbles. One is that it seemed a bit too meat-phobic. And at one point, the author said that "all" vegetable oils were okay and better than animal-based ones. Really? Because if you're comparing lard versus olive oil, then OK, the Blue Zones thing is probably behind that . But I'll take rendered duck fat or ghee over refined canola, soy or corn oil any day. And I highly doubt that traditional Sardinians or Okinawans had lots of Canola oil on their shelves anyway.

    But I don't want to get too caught up in nit-picking, because the typical American diet and lifestyle is terrible, and any book encouraging people to live another way, whether plant or paleo-centered, has the potential to help someone.

  • Sarah

    I've just won a copy of this book from Goodreads Giveaways. After it's arrived at my doorstep and I've had a chance to read it and formulate my thoughts, I'll post an honest review. Stay tuned!

  • Ashley Mebert

    Great recipes. Not preachy. Used "superfoods" zero times.

  • Danielle Dorchak

    Some good take-aways, but basic understanding can be had from watching the documentary made, or lectures done by Buettner.

    I'm glad that wild greens were recognized for their nutritional significance, and raw forms of milk, as well as lifestyle differences (naps, family style dining, steady movement, etc), but wish more focus would have been put on the gut microbe difference in people around the world due to diet, lifestyle, and environmental factors. It was the obvious thread running through th

    Some good take-aways, but basic understanding can be had from watching the documentary made, or lectures done by Buettner.

    I'm glad that wild greens were recognized for their nutritional significance, and raw forms of milk, as well as lifestyle differences (naps, family style dining, steady movement, etc), but wish more focus would have been put on the gut microbe difference in people around the world due to diet, lifestyle, and environmental factors. It was the obvious thread running through the various blue zones but not overtly stated.

  • Nick Pageant

    Buddy read with Mishy so we can live to be 100 together. We are going to be a very fun couple living on an island in the Mediterranean. According to this book, we will need to be mostly vegan and should probably have some goats to herd. Come see us if you're still alive. We'll serve you a salad and 3oz. of red wine.


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