Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon

Everything, Everything

My disease is as rare as it is famous. Basically, I’m allergic to the world. I don’t leave my house, have not left my house in seventeen years. The only people I ever see are my mom and my nurse, Carla.But then one day, a moving truck arrives next door. I look out my window, and I see him. He’s tall, lean and wearing all black—black T-shirt, black jeans, black sneakers, an...

Title:Everything, Everything
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:0553496646
Edition Language:English
Number of Pages:307 pages

Everything, Everything Reviews

  • Wendy Darling

    Pretty damned close to perfect. And this one is going to make a lot of top 10 lists this year, including mine.

    Review to come.

  • Jesse (JesseTheReader)

    this became an instant fave! beautiful writing, extraordinary story, & rich characters. full video review to come!

  • Emily May

    This is a book I expected to

    .

    It's a book many of my GR friends have loved.

    It's a book I

    kind of liking until the thing happens...

    ...the thing that just cheapens the entire story.

    I have been dying to read

    . The reviews were all positive, it received a Kirkus star, it sounded so

    ... all these reasons added up to one of my most anticipated reads of the year.

    And it started quite beautifully-written with diverse characters, including an Afro-Asian narrator c

    This is a book I expected to

    .

    It's a book many of my GR friends have loved.

    It's a book I

    kind of liking until the thing happens...

    ...the thing that just cheapens the entire story.

    I have been dying to read

    . The reviews were all positive, it received a Kirkus star, it sounded so

    ... all these reasons added up to one of my most anticipated reads of the year.

    And it started quite beautifully-written with diverse characters, including an Afro-Asian narrator called Madeline. Madeline's condition aside - being allergic to the entire world outside her sterile home - it quickly became evident that the book wasn't as unique as I'd anticipated. It follows in the footsteps of the great doomed love cheesefest of our time -

    - and other clones like

    .

    Unlike the aforementioned two, though, I found myself enjoying this book. It was more cheesy than sweet, in my opinion, but I still enjoyed the emphasis on the human need for

    . I thought Madeline was incredibly selfish at times, but this offered complexity to her character and her yearning was palpable:

    I did get a whiff of instalove. It's like Madeline first sets her eyes on Olly and her whole concept of the world changes. But I did like the build of their relationship after this, through miming at the window, chatting online and sharing poems, jokes and philosophical musings with one another. Even if Olly is a classic manic pixie dream boy who exists only to make Madeline want more.

    And then...

    . The twist that turns a story about an unusual, impossible relationship into JUST ANOTHER YA ROMANCE.

    It wasn't a great book before, but I was enjoying it. The ending, however, ruined the entire thing.

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  • Khanh (the meanie)

    This book is about a the most special different unique girl half black-half-Japanese girl in the world who has a super ultra extraordinarily rare disease which nobody can figure out which makes her allergic to everything, therefore she has to stay inside all day, who meets a boy who moves in next door, and

    . There is such a thing as trying too hard.

    I feel nothing for our doomed character. I don't really care that she could kick the bucket at any moment as she

    This book is about a the most special different unique girl half black-half-Japanese girl in the world who has a super ultra extraordinarily rare disease which nobody can figure out which makes her allergic to everything, therefore she has to stay inside all day, who meets a boy who moves in next door, and

    . There is such a thing as trying too hard.

    I feel nothing for our doomed character. I don't really care that she could kick the bucket at any moment as she randomly develops an allergy to her clothes, her mom, the furniture. I don't care about her. I don't feel bad for her. She is sheltered, dull, emotionally underdeveloped. I have no fucks to give about whatever silly ass random hopes and wishes and dreams she has (go to Hawaii! Whoo! That's my dream too. Whoop de doo).

    There are cute little drawings! Whoo! There are book spoilers (the mouse in

    died, and that book did make me cry in 5th grade).

    The Cute Boy Next Door(tm) sends her emails! They slowly fall in love!

    The end. It is that boring. Who gives a fuck?

    In all seriousness, I don't really read contemporary books, and I have criterias for them. They're supposed to make me feel for the main character. I want to suffer along with them. I want to fall in love along with them. I want to experience their joy, their pain. In a book in which a character is pretty much doomed from the start, I want to live each breath with them like it was their last.

    This book did nothing for me. There's a Bundt cake that "commits suicide" in the book. I felt more emotion for that cake than I did for anyone in this book.

  • Kat O'Keeffe

    Really impressed with this one! Cute romance, funny dialogue, and the format/illustrations made this even more fun and unique. I also thought this book did a fantastic job at balancing the lightheartedness with the more serious stuff. Personally, I could've done with a bit more resolution at the end--it felt a little rushed, and I would've liked to linger for a few more pages. Also, there were some things that didn't quite add up when I stopped to think about them, but I was able to suspend my d

    Really impressed with this one! Cute romance, funny dialogue, and the format/illustrations made this even more fun and unique. I also thought this book did a fantastic job at balancing the lightheartedness with the more serious stuff. Personally, I could've done with a bit more resolution at the end--it felt a little rushed, and I would've liked to linger for a few more pages. Also, there were some things that didn't quite add up when I stopped to think about them, but I was able to suspend my disbelief and just go with it.

    Overall, I thought this was a fantastic debut novel! Funny and sad and romantic all at once! Definitely recommended, especially if you like cute, unique contemporary.

  • Emma Giordano

    3 Stars. Unfortunately, I was a little let down by Everything Everything. I have heard people raving about it since 2015, I've been dying to read it since 2015. I can't exactly tell if it was just overhyped (by others and myself) or if the book just all around was not the best for me.

    The overarching positive thing I have to say about this book is that it was entertaining. Although I wasn't 100% satisfied with the story as a whole, I wanted to keep reading. It was addicting and amusing, and it wa

    3 Stars. Unfortunately, I was a little let down by Everything Everything. I have heard people raving about it since 2015, I've been dying to read it since 2015. I can't exactly tell if it was just overhyped (by others and myself) or if the book just all around was not the best for me.

    The overarching positive thing I have to say about this book is that it was entertaining. Although I wasn't 100% satisfied with the story as a whole, I wanted to keep reading. It was addicting and amusing, and it was an enjoyable read. Also, we get a main character who is biracial (African American/Japanese). Biracial characters don't always get their own stories in YA, so I was glad to see some positive representation on this front.

    I also really liked Olly and Maddie together. I thought they complimented each other well. Olly was always looking out for Maddie's best interests and was respectful and attentive to her needs. These are the types of love interests we need in YA and I was happy to see them together.

    That being said, I was irked by quite a lot of this book. Firstly, I felt there was way too much of a focus on romance being Maddie's drive to "truly live." I was very happy that at certain points, Maddie wanted to go outside for herself, to not feel restricted, and to be free. I may not agree with some of the risks Maddie took with her perceived condition, but if there was a reason for her to take those risks, a sense of taking control of your life and living for *you* is what I was glad to see. Unfortunately, I felt at a lot of time, that individual desire was overshadowed by a desire for love. There are so many points in this book where Maddie relays to Oly that she

    I felt that there was too much of a focus on the presence of Olly shaping Maddie's decisions, and at times her personal discovery was overshadowed by her love for him. I left this book, not with the message that you should live your life to the fullest, but that Maddie was okay with sacrificing her personal health for love, and that's something I'm vehemently against. Had there been a focus on Maddie accepting she made risky decisions for Olly and that she had a new-found desire to make those decisions for herself only, I would have been more okay with it. But whatever efforts were made to squash the idea that "putting yourself at risk is romantic" were not strong enough for me to condone those actions.

    (This section technically constitutes as "spoilers" so I'll hide it, but if you've seen the trailer or know what decisions of Maddie's that I'm talking about, you won't be spoiled.)

    Now we get to the issues with representation and research regarding SCID, which I'm not qualified to talk about, but feel it's important to address regardless.

    *I am incapable of accurately describing the issues of representation in Everything Everything.

    I read a review from Disability in Kidlit which wonderfully expressing why this book is harmful to people with disabilities. It spoils the ending for those of you that have not read it, but I feel it's an extremely well written review and I'd really recommend checking it out:

    I've heard in passing that Nicola Yoon has addressed the issues in Everything Everything, but I'm unable to find any credible sources. If she has, that's great because 90% of authors do not do that.

    Overall, I liked Everything Everything. I had fun reading it. I liked the characters. I enjoyed the story. But I had a lot of issues with it, some deeper than I can personally convey. I personally prefer The Sun Is Also A Star and I would definitely read more from her in the future, but I just don't think Everything Everything lived up to my expectations.

  • Cait • A Page with a View

    I was super excited when I read the description and heard the hype, but this story ended up being one of the worst things I've ever read. I’m in a very similar "bubble girl” situation as the main character, who has to stay in her house because going outside would kill her. But,

    The cop-out ending combined with the tagline of “the greatest risk is not taking one” felt like such a dismiss

    I was super excited when I read the description and heard the hype, but this story ended up being one of the worst things I've ever read. I’m in a very similar "bubble girl” situation as the main character, who has to stay in her house because going outside would kill her. But,

    The cop-out ending combined with the tagline of “the greatest risk is not taking one” felt like such a dismissal or slap in the face.

    For those of us who are in her situation & allergic to the world at large, the greatest risk

    taking one, IS in every single “ordinary” thing like breathing or eating. I get that the poor depiction of the illness ties into the eventual plot twist, but I wish that the book description and story didn't revolve so heavily around it then. How is exploiting a serious health condition for the sake of some poorly developed YA romance remotely ok?! Market this book as Munchausen by proxy syndrome then.

    I'm aware that the condition was not intended to be portrayed correctly in this book, but the author still trivialized the whole situation to seem like some fear-driven hypochondriac thing (so just let me rant for a second). The lack of authenticity in the girl's daily life while she believed she was sick was just insulting... she was able to eat countless foods. And I don’t care how great the air lock is on the door: if her mom goes in and out of the house in the same clothing, that defeats the entire purpose. My poor parents spend at least 15 minutes daily changing their clothes and scrubbing down.

    I know this ignorance is probably meant to be a reflection that the girl is actually fine instead of a matter of the author not caring enough to do basic research... but it's still a weak plot. Because how is the mother a doctor if she doesn't know something so basic?! This just felt like flagrantly irresponsible rep in the end with the way the book was marketed. It exploits the name of a real condition while portraying something entirely made up for the sake of a cheap plot twist.

    Yes, I do understand that the illness was not the point of the story, but that's kind of what's even more frustrating. People in my situation are largely cast aside by the medical system & society at large and left without a voice. That feeling like nobody cares and we don't matter is just reinforced here.

    I'm getting a lot of messages saying that this story wasn't about her illness so that poor depiction shouldn't matter because it was about her romance or self-discovery or whatever. If you replace the word "illness" in your argument with "race," "sexuality," "weight," or literally anything else, then those same people would be throwing a fit about bad rep as well. This book and the mindset it encourages are problematic because by supporting it and excusing such a central part of the story, you're saying

    . And that's what I'm hearing from readers who are championing this story as well... "the illness is just something for her character to get past, not the actual story. It doesn't matter if it's realistic." I'm not sure if I can adequately explain how it feels to think that your situation is actually visible for the first time, but then realize halfway through the book that others see you as more like some kind of freak show that's a good plot device for a character to overcome so

    she can actually start to live.

    The end message of the story is that your life is worth risking for the sake of being "normal" and the disability is something to wish away. It also implies that someone like me is not really living.

    That is such a completely privileged stance that it's beyond infuriating. A lot of people wish they had that choice. Trust me, I'm not sitting in my house for years on end because I lack initiative. I have worked SO hard to create a meaningful life without ever leaving this same small room for years or seeing another human besides my parents or sister. Books like this (or Me Before You) used to make me question if my life was less valid or meaningful but now I'm just over this crap.

    The diversity aspect is awesome, but that doesn't really change the ableism. So here are a few other books coming out this year I already read & loved that have diverse characters:

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  • Zoë

    4.5/5

    I really enjoyed this, especially the last 1/3 of the book! It had a unique premise, a great main character, a nice romance, and a great message. I recommend to all of you looking for a good quick read, whether you are usually a fan of YA romance or not!


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