Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

Romeo and Juliet

In Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare creates a world of violence and generational conflict in which two young people fall in love and die because of that love. The story is rather extraordinary in that the normal problems faced by young lovers are here so very large. It is not simply that the families of Romeo and Juliet disapprove of the lover's affection for each other; rath...

Title:Romeo and Juliet
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:0743477111
Edition Language:English
Number of Pages:283 pages

Romeo and Juliet Reviews

  • Madeline

    Romeo and Juliet, abridged.

    ROMEO: I’m Romeo, and I used to be emo and annoying but now I’m so totally in luuuuurve and it’s AWESOME.

    MERCUTIO: Okay, three things: One, there’s only room in this play for one awesome character and it’s

    , bitch. Two, you’re still emo and annoying. Three, didn’t you say that exact same stuff yesterday about Rosaline?

    ROMEO: Who?

    *meanwhile, Juliet prances around her room and draws hearts on things and scribbles “Mrs. Juliet Montague” in her diary over and over. Beca

    Romeo and Juliet, abridged.

    ROMEO: I’m Romeo, and I used to be emo and annoying but now I’m so totally in luuuuurve and it’s AWESOME.

    MERCUTIO: Okay, three things: One, there’s only room in this play for one awesome character and it’s

    , bitch. Two, you’re still emo and annoying. Three, didn’t you say that exact same stuff yesterday about Rosaline?

    ROMEO: Who?

    *meanwhile, Juliet prances around her room and draws hearts on things and scribbles “Mrs. Juliet Montague” in her diary over and over. Because she is THIRTEEN. How old is Romeo supposed to be? Let’s not talk about that, k?*

    CAPULET: Good news, Juliet! I found you a husband!

    PARIS: Hello, I’m a complete tool.

    JULIET: Daddy, I don’t want to marry that apparently decent and unflawed guy! I’m in love with Romeo Montague – we met yesterday and it was HOT.

    CAPULET: I WILL BE DAMNED IF I SEE MY ONLY DAUGHTER MARRIED TO THE ONLY SON OF THE MAN WHO IS MY MORTAL ENEMY FOR REASONS TOO UNIMPORTANT TO SPECIFY IN THIS PLAY!

    JULIET: *stamps foot, runs off to her room to watch High School Musical again and sulk*

    TYBALT: Hey Romeo, your mother was a hamster and your father smelt of elderberries!

    MONTAGUE POSSE: Oh,

    .

    MERCUTIO: YOU TAKE THAT BACK!

    TYBALT: MAKE ME!

    ROMEO: No! You can’t fight him, Mercutio

    !

    TYBALT: I KEEL YOU!

    *Romeo attempts to stop the fight and fails miserably*

    MERCUTIO: FUCK YOU ALL! *dies*

    ROMEO: Okay, forget what I said about not fighting. I KEEL YOU!

    TYBALT: *dies*

    PRINCE: I’ve had enough of your shit, Emo McStabbypants. You’re banished.

    ROMEO: Waaaaaahhhhhh! I’m banished and Juliet is going to marry another guy and it’s not fair WHY DOES GOD HATE ME?

    FRIAR LAURENCE: Jesus Christ, not this again. Okay, if you promise to grow a pair, I’ll help you and your wife out. Here’s the plan: she takes a potion that’ll make her go into a coma, and then she’ll get put in the family tomb and then you’ll sneak back into town, break into the tomb, wait until she wakes up, and then the two of you escape and live happily ever after! It’s perfect!

    AUDIENCE: …the hell?

    *Shockingly, the plan fails. Romeo goes back to the tomb (pausing to kill Paris just for good measure), but he thinks Juliet’s dead and drinks poison and dies, and then like two seconds later she wakes up and sees that Romeo isn’t

    dead like she was, he’s

    , so she stabs herself.*

    MONTAGUE: Wow, we are awful parents.

    CAPULET: I have an idea – let’s make solid gold statues of our dead children to commemorate their love and serve as a constant reminder of the fact that our only children killed themselves because we were such uncaring parents.

    *they actually do this.*

    SHAKESPEARE: Beat that, Stephenie Meyer.

    THE END.

    Read for: 9th grade English

    BONUS: courtesy of The Second City Network.

  • Nate

    I'm not sure what annoys me more - the play that elevated a story about two teenagers meeting at a ball and instantly "falling in love" then deciding to get married after knowing each other for one night into the most well-known love story of all time, or the middle schools that feed this to kids of the same age group as the main characters to support their angst-filled heads with the idea that yes, they really are in love with that guy/girl they met five minutes ago, and no one can stop them, e

    I'm not sure what annoys me more - the play that elevated a story about two teenagers meeting at a ball and instantly "falling in love" then deciding to get married after knowing each other for one night into the most well-known love story of all time, or the middle schools that feed this to kids of the same age group as the main characters to support their angst-filled heads with the idea that yes, they really are in love with that guy/girl they met five minutes ago, and no one can stop them, especially not their meddling parents!

    Keep in mind that Juliet was THIRTEEN YEARS OLD. (Her father states she "hath not yet seen the change of fourteen years" in 1.2.9). Even in Shakespeare's England, most women were at least 21 before they married and had children. It's not clear how old Romeo is, but either he's also a stupid little kid who needs to be slapped, or he's a child molester, and neither one is a good thing.

    When I was in middle school or high school, around the time we read this book, I remember a classmate saying in class that when her and her boyfriends' eyes met across the quad, they just knew they were meant to be together forever. How convenient that her soulmate happened to be an immensely popular and good-looking football player, and his soulmate happened to be a gorgeous cheerleader! That's not love at first sight, that's lust at first sight. If they were really lucky, maybe as time went on they would also happen to "click" very well, that lust would develop into love (it didn't), and they would end up together forever (they didn't). But if they saw each other at a school dance, decided they were "like, totally in love," and then the next day decided to run off and get married, we shouldn't encourage that as a romantic love story, we should slap the hell out of them both to wake them up to reality.

    For what it's worth, my cynicism doesn't come from any bitterness towards life or love. I met my wife when we were 17, and we've now been together almost 10 years, married for a little over 2. Fortunately for me, she turned out to be awesome. If we had decided the day after meeting each other that we were hopelessly in love and needed to get married immediately, we would have been idiots, and I hope someone who I trusted and respected would have slapped me, hard. If we were 13 at the time, that would be even worse. Enlightened adults injecting this into our youth as a classic love story for the generations, providing further support for their angst-filled false ideas of love and marriage, is probably worst of all.

  • Anne

    So, when the story opens, Romeo is desperately in love with Rosaline. But since she

    has sworn to remain chaste, he's all depressed and heartbroken.

    His friends, tired of his constant whining, give him a Beyoncé mixtape.

    He takes her words to heart, and her lyrics begin to mend his broken soul.

    His boys drag his sad ass to a party, and across a crowded room, Romeo spies his next victi

    So, when the story opens, Romeo is desperately in love with Rosaline. But since she

    has sworn to remain chaste, he's all depressed and heartbroken.

    His friends, tired of his constant whining, give him a Beyoncé mixtape.

    He takes her words to heart, and her lyrics begin to mend his broken soul.

    His boys drag his sad ass to a party, and across a crowded room, Romeo spies his next victim...er, his really-really for

    True Love.

    Meet 13 year old Juliet. Who is

    .

    And how old is Romeo? Well, he's old enough to kill Juliet's cousin in a sword fight, so...yeah. Probably

    13.

    But since he's such a punk little pussy - what with the whining, sobbing, and spouting off crap poetry - I'm going to assume he's not

    older than she is and say 15 or 16.

    Tragically, Juliet is a Hatfield, and Romeo is a McCoy. Their families have been feuding over a McCoy pig that was killed during a Hatfield moonshine run decades ago.

    Needless to say, tensions are still running high.

    So.

    They gotta keep their love on the down low.

    And it

    love, dammit! I mean, they've stared at each other a whole bunch, and had,

    ,

    conversations.

    This time around, Romeo isn't going to make the same mistake as before, and let the

    girl of his dreams slip through his fingers...

    Well...

    You know, I can't help but wonder what that first encounter would've been like if they'd met when they were older, you know?

    Anyhoo, this

    a romance, it's a cautionary tale.

    And a pretty funny one, at that! I originally gave it 3 stars, but I had to bump it up for making me giggle so much. Between Romeo & Juliet

    crying, moping, and twirling around like a tweenage girls, and the rest of the cast flailing around to accommodate these idiots, this was waaaaaay better than I remembered it.

    I listened to this on Playaway, so I got to have the audio version with a full cast of characters, sound effects, and music. Loved it! Totally recommend going this way if you're planning on trying out Shakespeare.

  • Haleema
  • Catriona

    The people who dislike this play are the ones who view common sense over being rational, and prefer to view the world in a structured way. One of the main arguments that come across is the 'meeting, falling in love, and dying all in a weekend when Juliet is but 13'. We all must die in the end, so wouldn't you want to in the name of love than of an awful disease?

    Perhaps the two lovers weren't truly in love, but their last living moments were spent believing so, so what does it matter? How can on

    The people who dislike this play are the ones who view common sense over being rational, and prefer to view the world in a structured way. One of the main arguments that come across is the 'meeting, falling in love, and dying all in a weekend when Juliet is but 13'. We all must die in the end, so wouldn't you want to in the name of love than of an awful disease?

    Perhaps the two lovers weren't truly in love, but their last living moments were spent believing so, so what does it matter? How can one truly know if one is in love? Is it a feeling? In that case, what is a feeling? If you believe you are in love, then you may as well be, contrary to what others might say.

    The argument with the 'weak' plot; Shakespeare didn't invent Romeo and Juliet. It was infact a poem which is constantly being adapted over time. Shakespeare did add in some aspects but the meeting in the ballroom, Tybalts death, the sleeping draught and such were already in the poem.

    I personally love this play, purely because it's an escape from this modern world. I'm not saying I like the treatment of women, nor the fighting, but it's like a different world that i'm never going to experience, and reading it through Shakespeare's gorgeous writing makes Verona seem all the more romantic.


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