And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

And Then There Were None

First, there were ten - a curious assortment of strangers summoned as weekend guests to a private island off the coast of Devon. Their host, an eccentric millionaire unknown to all of them, is nowhere to be found. All that the guests have in common is a wicked past they're unwilling to reveal - and a secret that will seal their fate. For each has been marked for murder. On...

Title:And Then There Were None
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:0312330871
Edition Language:English
Number of Pages:264 pages

And Then There Were None Reviews

  • Anne

    Turns out, I

    . This was a really good mystery!

    The story goes a bit like this:

    10 strangers each get invitations from

    they

    they know, to stay on an island resort. Hells yeah! Sunshine & sea air!

    Well,

    is a bit of a misnomer.

    It's really a big house on an island. Still, it's famous for being a party place, and nobody

    Turns out, I

    . This was a really good mystery!

    The story goes a bit like this:

    10 strangers each get invitations from

    they

    they know, to stay on an island resort. Hells yeah! Sunshine & sea air!

    Well,

    is a bit of a misnomer.

    It's really a big house on an island. Still, it's famous for being a party place, and nobody in the group turns it down.

    Almost as soon as everyone is gathered together, a recorded voice booms out through the walls, and accuses each of them of being a murderer. And not just...YOU'RE ALL MURDERERS! Nope, whoever it is appears to know specific details about each death, and why these particular people were responsible.

    Of course, everyone immediately starts proclaiming their innocence!

    However, within minutes one of them falls over dead.

    As the body count rises, they have to face the facts that these aren't accidents. And with each new death coinciding with a children's rhyme that's tacked up in each room, all signs point to a self-appointed executioner in their midst.

    After they get organized and take a peek around, they realize that they are quite alone on this island. Their mysterious benefactor must be disguised as one of the guests, and is more than likely...the murderer.

    The tension ratchets up with each body, and the guests start turning on each other in an attempt to ferret out the killer. Eventually, they decide they just need to calm down and survive till the police can get to the island.

    Good plan, right?

    So whodunit?

    I ain't tellin'.

  • Nataliya

    This lovely mystery book is first and foremost about the administration of the long-overdue justice, right? At least that's what the mastermind behind it all believes.

    But the question is -

    And who is to decide what punishment serves the crime? And is perceived justice at all costs the ultimate goal, or is it the frequently pointless work of a maniac? As a matter of fact, what is justice after all?

    I think the story of this book (

    This lovely mystery book is first and foremost about the administration of the long-overdue justice, right? At least that's what the mastermind behind it all believes.

    But the question is -

    And who is to decide what punishment serves the crime? And is perceived justice at all costs the ultimate goal, or is it the frequently pointless work of a maniac? As a matter of fact, what is justice after all?

    I think the story of this book (

    ) is familiar to most readers. It is a lovely and fascinating idea. Ten people are lured onto a remote island under false pretenses just to realize that they are all about to be punished by death for the 'crimes' that they have committed in the past and have gotten away with. Killed in a manner predicted by a silly yet ominous children's poem with the conclusion of

    . What's more, they come to realize that the mastermind - or maniac? - has to be among them.

    And as, despite the precautions, the number of people trapped on the island continues to decline, the uneasy tension sets in, and the impeccable facades begin to crack.

    The story is captivating and very smart, and the ending had me baffled for a bit the first time I read it. It has a neat resolution despite an obvious plot hole

    . It's an enjoyable read to say the least.

    Yes, on one hand, it's almost poetic justice to punish the criminals who thought they got away with it. On the other hand, is eye-for-an-eye the best way to get even? And who's to judge, anyway? Who is either conceited enough or deranged enough to assume that he has the right and the moral authority to determine guilt and the extent of punishment just like that?

    . But the degree of their guilt varies quite significantly in my perception, and it does not always coincide with what their 'unknown' judge/executioner thinks

    .

    Conceited, self-righteous crime? Decide for yourself.

    Speaking of

    - this novel has quite a bit to say on this subject. You see, many of the characters have already been judged and condemned by their own selves. Vera Claythorne and General Macarthur both are tormented by their guilt (and

    ). Interestingly, others, no less guilty, are not tormented by their conscience at all. But ultimately this does not matter at all for their survival; only the fact that they were deemed guilty (

    ).

    These are the thoughts that kept running through my head as I was reading this excellent non-traditional critically-acclaimed specimen of mystery literature. And therefore bravo to Miss Christie for making me think and care - and not just mindlessly flipping pages to get to the bottom of the whodunit. Because

    was much less important to me than

    and

    - especially

    .

    For all of this, I give it the unflinching

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  • Emily May

    I'm a big lover of Agatha Christie, she has written some fantastic murder mysteries and her stories never get tiring. But this is the one that just comes out on top every time.

    It partly, and quite amusingly, reminds me of that old American murder mystery in Sunset Beach. Basically, they're the only ones on this island and someone is killing them off one by one in accordance with the Ten Little Indians rhyme . And I swear I never saw it coming, and I'm usually very good at it. It's just a very cl

    I'm a big lover of Agatha Christie, she has written some fantastic murder mysteries and her stories never get tiring. But this is the one that just comes out on top every time.

    It partly, and quite amusingly, reminds me of that old American murder mystery in Sunset Beach. Basically, they're the only ones on this island and someone is killing them off one by one in accordance with the Ten Little Indians rhyme . And I swear I never saw it coming, and I'm usually very good at it. It's just a very clever novel, full of mystery and suspense and easily quite frightening at times.

    I like how Agatha Christie doesn't have to write a 500 page novel with a massive back story, her mysteries are very simply put together but always clever and hard to decipher. I would recommend this book to everyone.

  • Kinga

    Before I begin I would like to apologise for my use of the N word in this review.

    It is necessary, I promise.

    This book was originally published in UK under a charming title of "Ten Little Niggers". When it came to the US version in the 40's someone decided that 'Ten Little Niggers' is not the most marketable title for a book so they changed it to 'Ten Little Indians' (as it was still ok to call Native Americans Indians then).

    Only years after someone decided that neither 'Niggers', nor 'Indians'

    Before I begin I would like to apologise for my use of the N word in this review.

    It is necessary, I promise.

    This book was originally published in UK under a charming title of "Ten Little Niggers". When it came to the US version in the 40's someone decided that 'Ten Little Niggers' is not the most marketable title for a book so they changed it to 'Ten Little Indians' (as it was still ok to call Native Americans Indians then).

    Only years after someone decided that neither 'Niggers', nor 'Indians' is a fortunate choice of words for the title so it was changed to 'And Then There Were None' - the last line of the nursery rhyme which in this new version was called 'Ten Boy Soldiers'.

    This is the version that I read and I must say I am glad. I think I would be rather uncomfortable reading something called 'The Little Niggers', which takes place on 'Nigger Island' (how did Christie want to pull this off? 'Nigger Island' off the Devon coast? Really? How?).

    The premise, I am sure you know, is this: ten people end up cut off from the world on a tiny island. One of them is a murderer and people keep dying as in the nursery rhyme. Every person on the island has a secret and is guilty of a murder. It's the kind of murder where law is helpless. Nothing can be proven. This is why they found themselves on that island, at the mercy of a prototype 'Jigsaw' madman who decided justice must be done.

    The premise requires the structure of the novel to be very organised and clean cut. I felt that it was only right for me to approach the reading of it in an equally disciplined way. I took five sheets of papers and divide each in half, thus ending up with ten cards, one for each character.

    And I continued to dilligently fill them out with all the details I learnt about the characters until about halfway through the book when I became too engrossed, frightened and nervous. I already had an inkling as to who the murderer was and was petrified I would be murdered in my sleep as well. The situation was very serious and I had to invite all my teddy bears back to my bed, so they could protect me.

    I grew to like two of the characters - the sentiment, I think, I shared with Christie as she liked them so, she killed them last.

    This was my second Christie, and the first proper one. The first one I read was a bit of a mishap spy novel, so Christie's brilliance wasn't as apparent as it was in 'And Then There Were None'.

    4.5 stars

    PS> Thanks to karen I have just found this page -

    And here is their take on Ms Christie:

  • James

    5 stars to

    's

    . This is the book that started my absolute love of the mystery genre. I was addicted and must have read it 3 or 4 times over the course of the year. Between the poem, the deserted island, the plot twist, the count-down, the pure clandestine suspense... it couldn't get any better.

    Ten people receive a mystery letter from someone they don't know that indicates they should come to a remote island.

    After arriving, the

    5 stars to

    's

    . This is the book that started my absolute love of the mystery genre. I was addicted and must have read it 3 or 4 times over the course of the year. Between the poem, the deserted island, the plot twist, the count-down, the pure clandestine suspense... it couldn't get any better.

    Ten people receive a mystery letter from someone they don't know that indicates they should come to a remote island.

    After arriving, they try to figure out the connection between all of them while waiting for their mysterious host. After coming across a cute little poem about how ten little indians die, they decide they will wait it out until the next morning when the ferry comes back to take them home.

    Each guest suddenly dies matching the line from the poem... resulting in alliances and mistrust. Pure fun.

    In a masterful conclusion, the reader understands all the connections, learns why the killer chose them to die and develops a very distinct opinion on who was right and who was wrong in this story.

    Amazing!

    1. Plot - can you get any better than telling the reader that 10 people will die and then guessing the order and the weapon?

    2. Characters - All walks of life, all personalities. You'll love some and hate some!

    1. Only that there wasn't a follow-up...

    If you are a mystery fan, you must read this. If you've never read Agatha Christie, this must be your first - before you tackle Miss Marple or Hercule Poirot. You must understand the master before getting hooked on any specific protagonist in one of her other series.

  • Mohammed Arabey

    يجب أن أعترف أن ضيق أفقي هو مامنعني من دخول عالم أجاثا كريستي

    فمنذ صغري لم تبهرني أغلفة قصصها المترجمة للعربية

    كما أن معرفة والدي لافلامها وقراءة والدتي لروايتها منذ الصغر جعلني أشعر أن الغموض بهذه القصص "موضة قديمة" وألغازها ستكون مكشوفة لي

    ناهيك عن مقولة "لابد أن الخادم هو من فعلها كقصص أجاثا كريستي" جعلتني

    متشككا أن الحل دائما نمطيا

    فلماذا أقرأ لها؟..لم يعد هناك شئ

    الي ان جائتني دعوة..دعوه لقراءة احد كتب اجاثا كريستي لانها في قائمة أعلي

    يجب أن أعترف أن ضيق أفقي هو مامنعني من دخول عالم أجاثا كريستي

    فمنذ صغري لم تبهرني أغلفة قصصها المترجمة للعربية

    كما أن معرفة والدي لافلامها وقراءة والدتي لروايتها منذ الصغر جعلني أشعر أن الغموض بهذه القصص "موضة قديمة" وألغازها ستكون مكشوفة لي

    ناهيك عن مقولة "لابد أن الخادم هو من فعلها كقصص أجاثا كريستي" جعلتني

    متشككا أن الحل دائما نمطيا

    فلماذا أقرأ لها؟..لم يعد هناك شئ

    الي ان جائتني دعوة..دعوه لقراءة احد كتب اجاثا كريستي لانها في قائمة أعلي الكتب مبيعا في العالم متفوقة علي الالاف كتب التشويق والجريمة!!! مما جعلني متشوقا لمعرفه السبب

    تلك الدعوة كانت في ويكابيديا..قائمة اعلي الكتب مبيعا في التاريخ

    هذا ما جعلني متشوقا لمعرفه سر هذه الرواية..التي تفوقت في اثارتها وتشويقها علي الكثير من أقرانها في المبيعات..وحتي تفوقها علي كل روايات اجاثا كريستي

    وأن تظل محتفظة بغموضها وتشويقها كل هذه السنوات

    وقد كان...وبدأت في الكتاب

    كنت مصمما اولا ألا اقرأ اي ريفيو عن الرواية ولا ألمح حتي صفحات الافلام المبنية عنها

    فقد كنت مصمما ان اعرف اللغز وأحله بنفسي قبل انتهاء صفحات الرواية

    اتهامات غريبة يسمعونها بعد العشاء من جهاز تسجيل تم تشغيله

    إتهامات تخص ماضي كل شخصية من العشر شخصيات

    والمفترض انهم وحدهم بالجزيرة

    من قام بتسجيل تلك الأتهامات؟

    ونعم..كما تقول الاسطورة بعد العشاء الاول مباشرة..يختنق احدهم..كحادث مدبر؟ انتحار؟ جريمه قتل؟

    ثم يتبقي تسعة..ليتفكروا في الامر

    تتوالي الاحداث..في ترقب..من صاحب الدعوة؟ ماحقيقة الاتهامات؟

    كان هناك 10 تماثيل عساكر في وسط مائدة الطعام..لماذا صار فقط تسع بعد وفاه احدهم؟

    حتي وان تبقي ثلاثة..لن تعرف من يقوم بهذا

    هل هو احدهم؟ هل هناك احد غيرهم العشرة مختبئ في مكان ما؟

    هذا لا يمكن ان يكون صحيحا..لقد فتشنا المكان جيدا.حتي الجثث ..اهو حلم؟عذرا ..كابوس؟؟

    محمد العربي

    من 17 سبتمبر 2013

    الي 23 سبتمبر 2013

  • Alejandro

    I knew that the best way to start reading the literary work by Agatha Christie was choosing her most known book.

    is the best-selling mystery novel of all time with 100 million of copies, and the fifth book in the list comprehending all genres.

    is something to give to Agatha Christie the respect that she deserves.

    Initially this novel on UK was titled

    , only because the original nursery rhyme was called that but it was obv

    I knew that the best way to start reading the literary work by Agatha Christie was choosing her most known book.

    is the best-selling mystery novel of all time with 100 million of copies, and the fifth book in the list comprehending all genres.

    is something to give to Agatha Christie the respect that she deserves.

    Initially this novel on UK was titled

    , only because the original nursery rhyme was called that but it was obviously seen as racist, then in USA was decided to change the title to

    , but again obviously as seen as racist again, so at the end the title was changed to

    , and the nursery rhyme inside the book was changed to "Ten Little Soldiers", curiously enough none member of any army so far as pointed out as racist that final change. I mean, the title was just because a widely known nursery rhyme and none character on the book was afro-american or native-american.

    To this, I want to comment that it's lucky that not many children would had more nightmares since a lot of nursery rhymes have truly scary lyrics. No wonder in stuff like

    and

    were used nursery rhymes with truly scary effects.

    Returning to the novel, it was a remarkable reading. Great atmosphere where you feel as trapped as those people on that island.

    I want to comment that at some point I figured it out who was the murderer, don't worry, I won't tell it, and I have no doubt that some would say: "Oh, sure! I believe you Sherlock!". However I do indeed discovered it. This is not my first mystery story. I have read several books in the genre and I have watched a lot of TV shows like

    ,

    ,

    ,

    , etc... And while that doesn't turn me into a detective, in my defense, I knew who was only because I focused on the "why" and not the "how" that certainly I didn't know that. You can say that I did an amateur criminal profile and that helped me to have a suspect of my own that it resulted true. Also, I had some advantage for being Spanish speaking since there is a clue that only can be detected due that not matter that I read the novel on English, but taking in account the very detail that it's indeed a printed novel, I catched something and putting together some clues. Well, I figured it out. Believe or not. It doesn't matter.

    Anyway, I think that many of the fun of reading this kind of mystery novels is trying to figure out the culprit during the process of reading the book. Not matter if you guess right or not, always it's rewarding when the mystery is explained. A delicious way to make your neurons to exercise.

    Again, knowing who was, or at least thinking that I knew who was, since obviously I couldn't confirm it until reading the whole book, it didn't help me to know how everything was made until it was explained on the novel. Definitely, Agatha Christie is the queen of mystery!

    Certainly, this novel isn't only a marvellous detective mystery book but also a truly scary horror story. Priceless setting for a scenario and fantastic twisted character developing.

    The clue that I found thanks that I am a born Spanish-language speaker:

    Read

    if you already read the novel, since this is a mega-spoiler telling who the culprit is!

  • Brina

    This year I have decided to take part in a women's century challenge in the group catching up on classics where the participants read a book written in ten consecutive decades. I chose to focus on the 20th century and my 1930s selection is And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie. Although I had previously read some of her Hercule Poirot cases, this is my first stand alone mystery of Christie's that I have read. A suspenseful premise for a case, And Then There Were None left me on edge for th

    This year I have decided to take part in a women's century challenge in the group catching up on classics where the participants read a book written in ten consecutive decades. I chose to focus on the 20th century and my 1930s selection is And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie. Although I had previously read some of her Hercule Poirot cases, this is my first stand alone mystery of Christie's that I have read. A suspenseful premise for a case, And Then There Were None left me on edge for the duration of the book.

    Ten individuals who committed murder at one point in their lives have been invited to Soldier Island for a supposed holiday. Upon arrival, the participants note the quaintness of the island and the home which they are staying in. Yet, on top of the mantel in each bedroom is the poem "ten little Indians". In the communal dining room are ten salt shakers each representing a person and the same poem. As the group gathers for cocktail hour, a gramophone recording announces the crime each individual is guilty of committing. Shocked at first, each person comes to terms with the accusation and reveals what really happened to the group.

    Christie's participants represent a cross section of society including a judge, doctor, Scotland Yard police officer, retired general, mercenary, governess, and spinster. None of these primary participants believes themselves guilty of the crime because after all they were acquitted. Yet one of their party believes them all to be guilty, or they would not have been invited to Soldier Island. One by one the group is murdered, the island is searched, and the dwindling group realizes that there is a murderer in their midst. The death mirrors the poem on the wall, and as each person is killed, another salt shaker breaks. It is up to the remaining people to identify the murder.

    Unlike Hercule Poirot cases where Christie allows the reader to crack the case early on only to have Poirot peal back layers and layers to the case, in And Then There Were None, Dame Christie does not clue us as to who the murderer is. Even someone as myself who reads a fair number of mysteries was left captivated as to whodunit, allowing me to read quickly until the end of the book. The participants were also held in suspense, accusing each other of being the murderer. This lead to a revealing denouement, one that had me guessing until the last page.

    I have read many mysteries written by women, including many cases starring female private eyes and police detectives. Many of these mystery writers have Dame Agatha Christie to thank for paving their way as early as the 1920s. And Then There Were None first appeared in serial form, leaving its readers in suspense until the next installment appeared. A captivating mystery, I am open to reading more of Christie's stand alone cases, and rate this mystery 4 stars.


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