We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

We Were Liars

A beautiful and distinguished family.A private island.A brilliant, damaged girl; a passionate, political boy.A group of four friends—the Liars—whose friendship turns destructive.A revolution. An accident. A secret.Lies upon lies.True love.The truth.We Were Liars is a modern, sophisticated suspense novel from New York Times bestselling author, National Book Award finalist,...

Title:We Were Liars
Author:
Rating:
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:242 pages

We Were Liars Reviews

  • Emily May
    Nov 18, 2012

    It's true what they're saying: you're better off if I tell you nothing about this book.

    So I will just say two things.

    1) It is worth reading. Even though I only gave it 3 stars.

    2) I gave it 3 stars because of the writing style, which irritated the hell out of me. The fact that it got 3 stars after annoying me so much will hopefully give you some indication of how much I liked the idea.

    It's a very clever book and an incredibly sophisticated piece of YA. BUT... an execution that was not to my taste

    It's true what they're saying: you're better off if I tell you nothing about this book.

    So I will just say two things.

    1) It is worth reading. Even though I only gave it 3 stars.

    2) I gave it 3 stars because of the writing style, which irritated the hell out of me. The fact that it got 3 stars after annoying me so much will hopefully give you some indication of how much I liked the idea.

    It's a very clever book and an incredibly sophisticated piece of YA. BUT... an execution that was not to my tastes. The writing was too choppy and fragmented and I hated the frequent use of nouns as adjectives. Like this:

  • Blythe
    Sep 30, 2013

    sobbing. sobbing. sobbing. so much love for this book, and its perfect, perfect ending.

    i can't even capitalize right now. i don't even want to capitalize right now.

    in fetal position.

    sob.

    my souuuuul.

  • Steph Sinclair
    Nov 06, 2013

    I went into

    one cocky son of a biscuit eater, feeling above it all right from page one. I'd seen this book talked about so heavily by other bloggers and how some never saw the twist coming or how others 

    saw that twist coming. All the while, I was sitting on the sidelines with my shades on, posted up with my arms folded, saying, "Yeah, yeah, yeah. Hot potato." That's not to say I didn't

    to read this book, because I did. I even had an ARC sitting on my shelf for the long

    I went into

    one cocky son of a biscuit eater, feeling above it all right from page one. I'd seen this book talked about so heavily by other bloggers and how some never saw the twist coming or how others 

    saw that twist coming. All the while, I was sitting on the sidelines with my shades on, posted up with my arms folded, saying, "Yeah, yeah, yeah. Hot potato." That's not to say I didn't

    to read this book, because I did. I even had an ARC sitting on my shelf for the longest time, but due to a lot of the hype, I kept putting it off. Plus, I'm one of those people who usually can easily figure out a plot twist and I didn't want to dive into something where a lot of people already mentioned figuring it out.

    But one thing did nag me a little in the back of my mind was that my Bookish Twin, Blythe from

    , LOVED it. I highly value her opinion when it comes to books, because we almost always agree. So when I happened to get my hands on the audiobook, I thought, "What the hell? I was supposed to read and review this anyway, right?" Let me tell you... WHOA.

    Anyway, I was feeling very blasé about the first half. It felt like a really random story about a rich, white girl and her white girl problems, crying her white girl tears and I felt myself unsure about what the point of it all was.

    And maybe that makes me sound extremely heartless, but I couldn't relate to the main character (no, I'm not even going to tell you her name because I want you to go in blind). But somewhere along the lines, I started to become intrigued with the story because

    .

    Lockhart uses a very odd narration with fragmented sentences and strange descriptions, but I thought it was beautiful and unique. It added a very creepy layer on top the the existing oddness. It makes you question the main character, her account of the incident and the entire book. She's not very reliable and has the habit to cut off mid-sentence. I'm not sure if that was used as a way to distract the reader or if it was to used to make us question her sanity. Maybe a little bit of both. Either way, it worked on me.

    As things started to heat up and I reached the cusp of the climax, the narrator's voice increased in intensity. She began talking faster, became very emotional, then suddenly on the verge of tears!

    And I started thinking to myself, OH GOD NO. WHAT IS HAPPENING.

    And then IT was revealed and I was all, "WHAT IS THIS LIFE? I REJECT EVERYTHING ABOUT THIS ENDING. NOOOOOOO!!!!"

    So, naturally, I had a good cry and needed someone to hold me.

    By the end, I was all:

    I know this review might not be the most helpful in the world, but it's true what everyone says about

    . You should absolutely go in blind, with no expectations and let this book take your feels as it sees fit. If you are a fan of psychological thrillers like Stephanie Kuehn's

    or

    , than this one may be up your alley. I'll be here to hold you when you're finish.

    ARC was provided by the publisher via

    .

    More reviews and other fantastical things at

    .

  • Wendy Darling
    Nov 07, 2013

    We were tedious.

  • Khanh (the meanie)
    May 16, 2014

    (fuck you, Holden Caulfield). It wasn't a terrible book. I've read far worse. It's just that the writing style sometimes get on my nerves. The sentences are sometimes written fully, and oftentimes

    it

    just goes like

    this out of freaking

    nowhere. For no freaking.

    Reason at all. If that's the kind of thing that bothers you. Then you should probably avoid this book.

    The entire book is about a poor-little-rich-girl living with a poor-little-rich-family with the kind of ending that makes you go "WHAT THE ACTUAL KIND OF M. NIGHT SHYAMALAN FUCKERY IS THIS?!"

    It's not terrible.

    The "Liars" are more "Talkers," and they have almost no relevant role in the book because this book is about a pretentious girl with nothing but

    and

    .

    , they're not witty, they're not cute, they don't give off the sense of closeness and kinship that you get from growing up with someone their entire life. Hell, they're nowhere near

    kind of interesting.

    This is a coming of age, and nothing more. It has

    the

    kind

    of writing style

    that's often choppy

    like this. Commas

    are sometimes used. And sometimes not. Haphazardly. With no punctuality.

    No pun intended.

    The main character sometimes.

    Has the tendency to use overwrought, run on metaphors. To describe herself. And her headaches. Such as a helicopter blown by the wind tossed by the torrential rain in the wilds of Alaska felt by a little Eskimo girl during the first whispers of a glacial spring with the scent of violets and hints of lavender in the fields of Grasse.

    :

    Poor little Cadence Sinclair is wealthy. She is loved. She is one of the Sinclairs, a good-looking "old-money Democrat" family, think the Kennedys, without the political aspirations. They have names like Liberty, Taft, and Tipper. They go to Ivy League schools. They have trust funds. They have sired a generation of children, the leader of which is Cadence. Cadence and her crew call themselves

    The Liars are composed of her cousins Mirren, Johnny, and the outcast "Healthcliff," Indian love interest, Gat.

    The Liars supposedly cause trouble. They don't really. They do almost nothing. Cadence herself is sick. She is prone to theatrics, and she is not-so-secretly in love with Gat. She gets headaches. She feels self-pity. She is privileged. She doesn't realize it.

    :

    . But then again, I've never been a fan of this type of prose. Needless to say, I don't like e.e. cummings. The writing is so often choppy, haphazardly punctuated.

    Some situations are false.

    That, there, was a description of how she FELT.

    , until I realized that the guy was fucking bandaging her up afterwards.

    The main character has a huge tendency to use

    She describes her migraines like they were the end of the world, which, I understand to some people they might be, but

    I just couldn't take it.

    :

    syndrome. She's beautiful, but wounded, and "mysterious" and revered, just for the sake of her blood alone, for the sake of her family's name alone. Think about it. If you were a Kennedy, it doesn't matter if you look like an elephant stepped on your head when you were born. People are still going to love you and worship you and whisper your name with reverence because you're a motherfucking Kennedy. It's this way with the Sinclairs, only there's no paparazzi following them around. All of the benefits, and no family curse. But somehow Cadence finds a way to be a

    She's rich. She's hypocritical about her wealth because she criticizes her own fucking family for being wealthy. She does stupid shit like give things away to random people because she can.

    She is spoiled. She takes her wealth for granted.

    :

    He is Indian-American. Gat Patil. He is the nephew of her aunt's boyfriend, and they've known each other for years. He is self-aware. Too self-aware in the pretentious way that teenagers can often be, but his character feels authentically teenaged. I liked him. He is accepted into The Liars, but he's not altogether accepted in the family. Because of his skin color, because of his lack of family money, he feels left out. And I can sympathize with him.

    Gat is intelligent. Reasonable. Likeable. And I wonder why the fuck he cares about a waste of air like Cadence.

  • Ariel
    Jun 13, 2014

    This was, without a doubt, one of the most powerful and well-crafted books I have read in a really long time.

    Elements that made this book outstanding:

    1) It started with a map and a family tree. Talk about setting yourself up for success!

    2) The personification of emotion. This might not make sense unless you've read the book, but wow it was powerful.

    3) The use of fairy tales from the main character to describe situations.

    4) The sense of complete mystery and suspicion: I was always questioning ev

    This was, without a doubt, one of the most powerful and well-crafted books I have read in a really long time.

    Elements that made this book outstanding:

    1) It started with a map and a family tree. Talk about setting yourself up for success!

    2) The personification of emotion. This might not make sense unless you've read the book, but wow it was powerful.

    3) The use of fairy tales from the main character to describe situations.

    4) The sense of complete mystery and suspicion: I was always questioning everything.

    5) The use of dramatic lines. You know when an author brings in an epic moment-stopping line? This was full of those awesome drops!

    6) The moment. There's a moment where all is revealed and IT WAS PERFECT.

    7) The consequential understanding. Everything suddenly clicked into place and it was glorious.

    8) The side characters. I think sometimes side characters can feel inconsequential and here they felt really important.

    There weren't very many things I didn't like, to be honest, but there was one:

    1) The title. It does't make sense to me. I don't want to say anything in case spoilers, but I don't think it's the perfect title.

    Two final things:

    1) I have a theory. I have a theory about this book that I'm really excited to discuss so I'm going to make a video about it!

    2) This book really made me cry. Like explode cry. Lots of tears. And I've only ever cried at 2 other books.

    I absolutely recommend this book, to everyone who likes books, because MAN, THIS WAS A GOOD BOOK.

  • Lola  Reviewer
    Jul 18, 2014

    This is the kind of book that, when I finish reading it, I’m like

    and then throw the book out of the window (in this case not applicable because of digital copy so I'm doing it through a gif.)

    But really, what a weird story and an uncomfortable and pretentious atmosphere this

    book has. It wasn’t long, thank God, but damn it was painful to read. This is my 3rd negative review/read this week and I’m seriously pissed but will try to keep it cool.

    I didn’t get

    the purpose of thi

    This is the kind of book that, when I finish reading it, I’m like

    and then throw the book out of the window (in this case not applicable because of digital copy so I'm doing it through a gif.)

    But really, what a weird story and an uncomfortable and pretentious atmosphere this

    book has. It wasn’t long, thank God, but damn it was painful to read. This is my 3rd negative review/read this week and I’m seriously pissed but will try to keep it cool.

    I didn’t get

    the purpose of this book.

    Why were they called

    Liars anyway? Okay

    they lied but who doesn’t?

    Why are they supposed to

    be so

    special? Because

    some of them are rich? So what?

    Many people are as well and it

    doesn’t make them

    more

    interesting/special.

    (Did it annoy you? How I just wrote what I wrote? If it did, this is not the book for you.)

    It’s like the author wanted to make this story ‘phenomenal’ and so damn poignant and thought that by adding some metaphorical sentences, a different writing style and a heavy recycled subject she would succeed. But she didn’t. At least, not for me. I personally thought it felt very pretentious and TOO MUCH. The pacing is uneven and the story very repetitive. The characters, except maybe for Cady, the MC, are one dimensional and I couldn’t connect with any one of them.

    Again with the subject, is it mainly about...rich-wants-to-date-‘poor’-guy-aka-love-of-her-life-but-can-t-because-family? So confusing... but I guess that’s it since THAT started a lot of stuff. The love story, by the way, is so so so dull. This is all because of the hype…

    Oh, the hype was there. It.IS.There. But we all know hype lies and loves doing it.

    This is not the type of book I usually read because it feels, just by reading the ‘synopsis’ (really? couldn’t this book have at least a normal synopsis?) too sad/dark/eerie for me but, HEY, we all need to step out of our comfort zone from time to time. PLUS, John Green praised this book. He

    ''

    John Green, #1

    bestselling author of

    ''

    praised this book. And, since I finished reading

    not so long ago and loved it, I thought I’d trust Green’s judgement.

    Except, it was boring. Boring. Boring. Boring. The only parts I felt myself enjoying reading are the little ‘stories’ with the king and his 3 daughters.

    I really don’t recommend this book. It’s a waste of time because it’s confusing as hell and doesn’t even have a nice/normally written ending.

    I wish I could burn it.

  • Shelby *trains flying monkeys*
    Jan 27, 2015

    It's been awhile since I have so totally hated a book.

    I'm surprised at how varied the feelings on here about this book are...some of my friends hated it.

    Some of them liked/loved it.

    I still love them....

    Let's get to why I hated this so very frigging much.

    The main character is a twit...but then the whole family is:

    That's actually the good part o

    It's been awhile since I have so totally hated a book.

    I'm surprised at how varied the feelings on here about this book are...some of my friends hated it.

    Some of them liked/loved it.

    I still love them....

    Let's get to why I hated this so very frigging much.

    The main character is a twit...but then the whole family is:

    That's actually the good part on her family. In some parts of the book the author tries and make the character act like she has redeeming qualifications-but then a short few pages later I just want to smash her again.

    The writing style:

    Good grief..I thought it was only going to last for a few pages. NOOOOOOO, almost the whole frigging book is written like this....

    Then that lovely twist of an ending:

    I'm probably going to hell for this but don't click if you gonna whine...

    There's one part I never did figure out. Cady the main character keeps talking about bleeding..Did she cut or was that just supposed to be a metaphor or some crap?

    Now after reading this crap I need:

    And lastly..for the trolls and fangirls and gif haters (should have thrown that one in) that will come....GO suck monkey ass..this book sucks!

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