Remember Me? by Sophie Kinsella

Remember Me?

When twenty-eight-year-old Lexi Smart wakes up in a London hospital, she’s in for a big surprise. Her teeth are perfect. Her body is toned. Her handbag is Vuitton. Having survived a car accident—in a Mercedes no less—Lexi has lost a big chunk of her memory, three years to be exact, and she’s about to find out just how much things have changed.Somehow Lexi went from a twent...

Title:Remember Me?
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:0593053893
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:352 pages

Remember Me? Reviews

  • Laura
    Feb 26, 2008

    This book represents every reason why I do not just pick up adult novels and read them without getting a trusted opinion. But, I'd heard of this author from her previous work (even though I've never read them), it's been well received, and the description sounded interesting, so I thought I'd try it. The fact that every other page contained the f-word (

    an exaggeration) was enough to turn me off to the book. Add in the fact that the characters discussion of sex made it sound more like a

    This book represents every reason why I do not just pick up adult novels and read them without getting a trusted opinion. But, I'd heard of this author from her previous work (even though I've never read them), it's been well received, and the description sounded interesting, so I thought I'd try it. The fact that every other page contained the f-word (

    an exaggeration) was enough to turn me off to the book. Add in the fact that the characters discussion of sex made it sound more like a

    high school locker room, and I'd had enough. Do women really talk like that? I expected to turn to the back cover and see a picture of a construction worker instead of Ms. Kinsella. I didn't feel connected to a majority of the characters, and I finished it only because I have a hard time leaving a book without some type of resolution, but most pages I had to simply skim through. It's rare that I say a book is not worth reading, but this would have to be one of them. I think I'll stick with my previous inclinations to get an opinion from a trusted friend first, which is the main reason I love Goodreads!

  • Michele
    Mar 13, 2008

    Lexie Smart. Was she or was she not Ghandi in a previous life? The fun and farcical story of Lexie Smart has the heroine in this tale,

    , wondering how she got to a completely different station in life between the years 2004 and 2007. She believes she's stumbled into a dream life, but soon steps into a hornet's nest of complications, including finding out she's married to a "guy she just met," Eric, who is so rigid you have to sit up straighter just readin

    Lexie Smart. Was she or was she not Ghandi in a previous life? The fun and farcical story of Lexie Smart has the heroine in this tale,

    , wondering how she got to a completely different station in life between the years 2004 and 2007. She believes she's stumbled into a dream life, but soon steps into a hornet's nest of complications, including finding out she's married to a "guy she just met," Eric, who is so rigid you have to sit up straighter just reading about him. She also discovers her best mates, a colorful threesome, have grown to hate her and call her the "bitch boss from hell."

    Having no basis for comparison with the author's earlier works, this was just plain an enjoyable little story about a young woman trying to piece together her life after a car accident causes her to suffer from amnesia. She can't remember the last three years of her life and the drastic changes she underwent to go from a snaggletooth bumbler to a high-styled corporate bigwig married to a millionaire. It's well written, very funny and has a clever plot that kept me turning pages at a record pace. I can see why Kinsella has so many fans and look forward to reading her Shopaholic series.

  • Trin
    Apr 30, 2008

    This would usually be the time when I would ask the largely rhetorical and semi-pathetic question, “Why do I keep reading Sophie Kinsella books?” Well, this time the answer is blatantly obvious—the plot of this one involves

    , yo, and I can never resist amnesia—and the question is kind of unfair. Because this wasn’t so bad—

    less annoying than the last few

    books. Kinsella’s strength has always been her ability to create an amusing, fast-paced narrative, and coupled with the a

    This would usually be the time when I would ask the largely rhetorical and semi-pathetic question, “Why do I keep reading Sophie Kinsella books?” Well, this time the answer is blatantly obvious—the plot of this one involves

    , yo, and I can never resist amnesia—and the question is kind of unfair. Because this wasn’t so bad—

    less annoying than the last few

    books. Kinsella’s strength has always been her ability to create an amusing, fast-paced narrative, and coupled with the amnesia plot, I really didn’t want to put this book down. However, it also shares many of the same irritating traits as Kinsella’s other novels. The protagonist is once again a flighty, shallow woman who spends most of the book flailing and helpless, wriggling out of scrapes mostly through luck and/or the help of a strong, powerful man. Also, Kinsella really has no idea what it means to be poor. Not only are these novels full of rich people, the “poor” characters still have large country houses (but they

    kind of funny!) or can afford their own flats in London. Uh-huh. I wish I had your problems, ladies.

    For what this was, it was fun enough. Actually, in some ways it’s becoming funnier in retrospect, because I’m realizing what the plot reminded me of. In

    , 24-year-old Lexi wakes up after receiving a bump on the head to discover that she’s actually a very different and successful 28-year-old version of herself who’s lost four years of her memory after a car accident. Which brings to mind a book I read as a teenager,

    by

    , in which 13-year-old Stacy wakes up after a four-year coma to solve a murder and embark on a vaguely squicky romance with a 23-year-old. Mostly I remember the latter book due to its having one of the most unintentionally hilarious last paragraphs ever: “My cheek glows from the warmth of his skin through his shirt, and I can hear the steady beat of his heart. I put my arms around him. I’m Stacy McAdams. I’m seventeen. And I’m definitely in the right body!” Ahahahahaha. I guess we should all be glad that in

    , Lexi merely engages in some rather embarrassing activities involving muffins.

    Since this review has clearly descended into tangent city, I’d also like to call attention to something that was in no way Kinsella’s fault, but which made me want to laugh/cry almost as much as Stacy’s self-affirmations. Dear American publishers of English novels: We, your readers, are not idiots. We can figure out that, if a novel is set in London, “football” means the sport with the round ball and “crisps” are not some unfathomable food, even more impossible to decode than this “Philosopher’s Stone” I’ve heard stories of. We might, in fact, be reading this book set in London in part to soak up the English atmosphere and indulge our Anglophilia. So you are in fact helping no one when you take a manuscript from across the pond and do a find/replace on all the “British” terms, leaving you with a long scene that involves your heroine making repeated and unintentionally comic reference to a “packet of chips.” Yes, thank you for clarifying that the characters did not just purchase a plastic bag of French fries from a gas station; however, you’ve now got them sounding like poor confused souls with horrible mid-Atlantic accents. NO ONE SAYS PACKET OF CHIPS. Americans say bag of chips. English people say packet of crisps. Please choose one or, better yet, LEAVE IT THE HELL ALONE. Next thing you know all novels will take place in North Generica, because god forbid readers be exposed to something unfamiliar or spend half a second feeling CONFUSED.

    [/rant]

    So annnnnnnyway…like I said, way way back in my first paragraph, this was actually pretty fun and diverting. Much better than the later Shopaholic books, and a perfectly decent beach or plane read. Or in my case, couch and bathtub read. If you’re in need of some froth, you could do a lot worse. After all, this is froth WITH BONUS AMNESIA.

  • Susan
    May 18, 2008

    Sophie Kinsella's books follow a formula that's as simple and delicious as my favorite chocolate chip cookie recipe.

    Start with a twenty-something heroine who's slogging away at her career in London. She's far from perfect. Neither an Oxbridge graduate, cover girl, or WAG of a world-class footballer, our girl's best quality is that she's a true-blue friend. She's a pretty hard worker, decent and well-meaning. She hasn't a mean bone in her body. Her flaws tend to run in the direction of materiali

    Sophie Kinsella's books follow a formula that's as simple and delicious as my favorite chocolate chip cookie recipe.

    Start with a twenty-something heroine who's slogging away at her career in London. She's far from perfect. Neither an Oxbridge graduate, cover girl, or WAG of a world-class footballer, our girl's best quality is that she's a true-blue friend. She's a pretty hard worker, decent and well-meaning. She hasn't a mean bone in her body. Her flaws tend to run in the direction of materialism. This may manifest itself in a shopping addiction, or a tad too much lusting after designer goods, or a bit too much interest in the glitzy trappings of material success. The recipe in

    is slightly different--like an inverse chocolate chip cookie recipe, I suppose. (Chocolate dough with white chocolate chips). The heroine was a brilliant, high-powered City attorney or investment banker(can't remember which), who lived for her work but was clueless outside the office.

    To these raw ingredients is added a crisis: a nasty workplace conspiracy (

    ), a terrifying plane ride that loosens her lips(

    ), or an automobile crash(

    ). If I recall, the

    books' crises pretty much revolve around the pitfalls of overspending. :)

    The crisis performs a function as essential as the baking soda in the cookie recipe: it forces our heroine to rise to the occasion. She draws on qualities that she never knew she possessed, using them to make lemonade from lemons. The sugar is of course provided by Mr. Perfect, who crops up somewhere in her newly-jumbled circumstances. Our lucky London heroine grows in important ways, and finds true love in the process.

    Lexi Smart, the central character in

    , learns an especially important lesson: the perfect life-- with a perfect body, career, and husband--just isn't all it's cracked up to be.

    I know that cookies aren't good for me. I should be eating fruits and veggies, right? But once in a while I really need to indulge myself in something that's unrealistically sweet, simple and predictable. What fun to imagine that career success can come so easily from selling vintage carpet designs--and in London, no less!

    Conclusion:

    is an especially quick and fun read that's driven by an admirable philosophy that I'm determined to adopt. I give it four yummy stars.

  • Mafi
    Apr 19, 2009

    Sophie Kinsella é Sophie Kinsella...a rainha do chick-lit! Os seus livros divertem-me como ninguém se bem que entre todos os livros únicos da autora, este é capaz de ser o mais fraquinho (Agora lembrei-me do "És capaz de guarda um segredo? esse sim é o mais fraco dela!) Ainda assim foi uma boa leitura de entretenimento.

    A sinopse lança basicamente a premissa do livro, temos a Lexi que numa noite de farra com as amigas, cai ao tentar apanhar um táxi. Na manhã seguinte, acorda numa cama de hospital

    Sophie Kinsella é Sophie Kinsella...a rainha do chick-lit! Os seus livros divertem-me como ninguém se bem que entre todos os livros únicos da autora, este é capaz de ser o mais fraquinho (Agora lembrei-me do "És capaz de guarda um segredo? esse sim é o mais fraco dela!) Ainda assim foi uma boa leitura de entretenimento.

    A sinopse lança basicamente a premissa do livro, temos a Lexi que numa noite de farra com as amigas, cai ao tentar apanhar um táxi. Na manhã seguinte, acorda numa cama de hospital, sem saber bem onde foi parar e porque é que as suas unhas estão perfeitas, os seus dentes arranjados e tem uma mala de uma marca cara. Depressa descobre com muita confusão da sua parte que está no ano de 2007, embora a última coisa que se lembre é a tal festa com as amigas que aconteceu em...2004!

    (...)

    O que posso dizer? Foi uma leitura divertida! É que não há melhor adjectivo para classificar as leituras desta autora. A Lexi foi uma óptima protagonista mas como já tinha dito na minha opinião de "Tenho o teu núm3ro" a Lexi não é diferente da Samantha ou da Becky, aliás para eu não andar a repetir-me passo a citar-me:

    Para quem já é fã como eu, já sabe o que espera. Não foi surpresa as mil e uma trapalhadas em que a protagonista Poppy se meteu. Eu já previa isso e realmente foi isso que aconteceu. As personagens principais que Sophie Kinsella caracterizam são sempre todas iguais, apenas mudam os nomes. São todas trapalhonas, divertidas e muito muito mas mesmo muito curiosas! E isso é meio caminho andado para divertir o leitor. É realmente um ponto positivo nas leituras desta autora e mais uma vez consegui arrancar boas gargalhadas com as aventuras da Poppy. O único defeito com a Poppy é que eu já vi esta personagem imensas vezes: em 6 livros da série Louca por Compras e na "Fada do Lar". A Poppy não se distingue das outras protagonistas criadas pela autora, e embora seja uma personagem que divirta não lhe encontrei características inovadoras.

    Neste caso basta trocarem a Poppy pela Lexi e a minha citação continua actual. E atenção que já li o "Tenho o teu núm3ro" há dois anos e mesmo assim continuo a achar o mesmo das protagonistas que a Kinsella cria. Não é que seja mau mas gostava de ver algo totalmente diferente por parte da autora. Talvez seja por isso que estou muito curiosa em ler o seu 1º livro young-adult, só para ver se a protagonista é também trapalhona e caricata.

  • Lindsey Rey
    Mar 25, 2015

    Cute, fun, and hilarious as always!

  • Shannon (leaninglights)
    Oct 22, 2015

    Actual Rating 4.5 stars

    I really enjoyed this one! My favorite Kinsella book to date. I'm still not a fan of the relationship storyline that I get from this book and the other two adult SK books I've read... I don't know if it's the chick lit genre or just Kinsella, but I'm hoping some of her other books have something different to offer. But aside from that, the story was so funny and crazy but it just worked. I was laughing out loud and cringing all the way! Is it just me or does Sophie know ho

    Actual Rating 4.5 stars

    I really enjoyed this one! My favorite Kinsella book to date. I'm still not a fan of the relationship storyline that I get from this book and the other two adult SK books I've read... I don't know if it's the chick lit genre or just Kinsella, but I'm hoping some of her other books have something different to offer. But aside from that, the story was so funny and crazy but it just worked. I was laughing out loud and cringing all the way! Is it just me or does Sophie know how to write the most cringe-worthy embarrassing scenes for her leading ladies?? Haha It's almost painful to get through at times but so, so, so funny! I highly recommend this one :)

  • maybelline ⚓
    Jan 22, 2017

    Typically, I don’t give 2 star ratings cause I’ve never felt like a book was just “ok.”

    It’s usually, I

    a book, enjoy it, find it pleasant, or hate it. Finding a book that is just “ok” for me is rare.

    But sadly, I must give it to this book.

    was an interesting book with great potential but terrible, terrible implementation.

    It was boring and predictable and just dull to read. When thinking about continuing to read the book, I’d feel like I was being forced to do chores and tha

    Typically, I don’t give 2 star ratings cause I’ve never felt like a book was just “ok.”

    It’s usually, I

    a book, enjoy it, find it pleasant, or hate it. Finding a book that is just “ok” for me is rare.

    But sadly, I must give it to this book.

    was an interesting book with great potential but terrible, terrible implementation.

    It was boring and predictable and just dull to read. When thinking about continuing to read the book, I’d feel like I was being forced to do chores and that’s

    something you want to feel when reading.

    Like, um no, stop this nonsense.

    It’s about this girl who’s having the worst luck in the world then wakes up the next day to find herself in the hospital with a sparky wedding ring and 3 years’ worth of missing memories.

    The whole point of the story is for her to retrieve her memory but like *yawn* I could barely make it through this one.

    One of my problems with it, is that I found it to be too juvenile. Now, I’m one to appreciate silly humour, sly quips, and lots of sass but the characters in this book are more like middle aged adults trying to act young by using words like “hip” and “rad.”

    Also, the whole plot is kinda just missing, like yes I understand you lost your memory and now you have no idea who you are and now you must find yourself and look beyond your exterior and blossom into the beautiful, empowered young woman you really are, but seriously,

    And now, I must apologize to my dearest friends who are probably unfriending and blocking and deleting me right now because they loved this book and I’m being a judgmental poo, but I’M NOT SORRY. (ง •̀_•́)ง

    2 stars!!

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    book #2 in the

    binge read


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